33990340

Letter to Hyrum Smith with Agnes Coolbrith Smith postscript, 11 April 1839

Letter to Hyrum Smith with Agnes Coolbrith Smith postscript, 11 April 1839

Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

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April 11th 1839
Brother Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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, after reading a line from you to myself, and one to Father

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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which awakens all the feelings of tenderness and brotherly affection that one heart is capable of containing, I sit down in haste to answer it; My health and that of my family is tolerable good, Mother

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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and Lucy Smith

18 July 1821–9 Dec. 1882. Born at Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York. Daughter of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church, possibly 1830. Lived at The Kingdom, unincorporated settlement near Waterloo, Seneca...

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have been very sick but are getting better. Your family are in better health now than at any other period since your confinement: Mary Fielding Smith is getting tolerable good health, she is doing the best she can for the good and enjoyment of the children; the family are all together and seem to be contented. Lovina is a good girl and has quite a motherly care for the children, and takes considerable interest in the welfare of her mother. As respects you fears concerning Mary, you may put them to rest: I believe that she is your friend, and desires to promote your happiness; I have no fault to find with Mary, for she has had a long fit of sickness, and where there has been a lack of wisdom, had she been well and had her own way, there would in all probability been no call for the observations that I made in my letter to you. I think it will be wisdom for Sister Mercy Fielding Thompson

15 June 1807–15 Sept. 1893. Born in Honeydon, Bedfordshire, England. Daughter of John Fielding and Rachel Ibbotson. Immigrated to Upper Canada, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt, 21 May 1836, near Toronto. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio...

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to remain where she is at present. The course that we have pursued I think has proved advantageous to her. Brother Hyram

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
I am in hopes that my letter did not increase your trouble, for I know that your affliction is too great for human nature to bear, and if I did not know that there was a God in Heaven, and that his promises are sure and faithful, and that he is your friend in the midst of all your trouble, I would fly to your relief and either be with you in prison, or see you breathe free air, air too that had not been inhaled and corrupted by a pack of ruffians who trample upon virtue and innocence with impunity and are not even satisfied with the property and blood of the Saints, but must exult over the dead. You both have my prayers, my influence, and warmest feelings with a fixed determination if it should so be, that you should be destroyed, to avenge your blood four fold. Joseph must excuse me for not writing to him at this time Give my love to all the prisoners, write to me as often as you can, and do not be worried about your families; Your’s in affliction as well as in peace.
Don Carlos Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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[p. 39]
Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

More Info
April 11th 1839
Brother Hyrum [Smith]

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
, after reading a line from you to myself, and one to Father

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

View Full Bio
 which awakens all the feelings of tenderness and brotherly affection that one heart is capable of  containing, I sit down in haste to answer it; My health and that of my family is  tolerable good, Mother

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

View Full Bio
and Lucy [Smith]

18 July 1821–9 Dec. 1882. Born at Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York. Daughter of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church, possibly 1830. Lived at The Kingdom, unincorporated settlement near Waterloo, Seneca...

View Full Bio
have been very sick but are getting better. Your family  are in better health now than at any other period since your confinement: Mary [Fielding Smith] is getting  tolerable good health, she is doing the best she can for the good and enjoyment of the chil dren; the family are all together and seem to be contented. Lovina is a good girl  and has quite a motherly care for the children, and takes considerable interest in the  welfare of her mother. As respects you fears concerning Mary, you may put them  to rest: I believe that she is your friend, and desires to promote your happiness; I have  no fault to find with Mary, for she has had a long fit of sickness, and where there has  been a lack of wisdom, had she been well and had her own way, there would in all prob ability been no call for the observations that I made in my letter to you. I think it  will be wisdom for Sister [Mercy Fielding] Thompson

15 June 1807–15 Sept. 1893. Born in Honeydon, Bedfordshire, England. Daughter of John Fielding and Rachel Ibbotson. Immigrated to Upper Canada, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt, 21 May 1836, near Toronto. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio...

View Full Bio
to remain where she is at present. The course that  we have pursued I think has proved advantageous to her. Brother Hyram

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
I am  in hopes that my letter did not increase your trouble, for I know that your  affliction is too great for human nature to bear, and if I did not know that there  was a God in Heaven, and that his promises are sure and faithful, and that he is  your friend in the midst of all your trouble, I would fly to your relief and either be with  you in prison, or see you breathe free air, air too that had not been inhaled by and  corrupted by a pack of ruffians who trample upon virtue and innocence with impunity  and are not even satisfied with the property and blood of the Saints, but must exult  over the dead. You both have my prayers, my influence, and warmest feelings  with a fixed determination if it should so be, that you should be destroyed, to avenge  your blood four fold. Joseph must excuse me for not writing to him at this time  Give my love to all the prisoners, write to me as often as you can, and do not be worried  about your families; Your’s in affliction as well as in peace.
Don C[arlos] Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

View Full Bio
[p. 39]
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Don Carlos Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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, Letter, Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

More Info
, IL, to Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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, Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, MO, 11 Apr. 1839, with postscript by Agnes Coolbrith Smith

11 July 1811–26 Dec. 1876. Born at Scarborough, Cumberland Co., Maine. Daughter of Joseph Coolbrith and Mary Hasty Foss. Moved to Boston, by 1832. Baptized into LDS church, 1832, at Boston. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, summer 1833. Married Don Carlos...

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; in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 39–40; handwriting of James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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; CHL.

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