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“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

and what they left behind them, made a prey of.
Mr. Patten

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

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, at last got so near the mob, that they left their cannon and fled. He took the cannon, and returned to Diawman Adam-ondi-Ahman

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

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, and thus ended the scene of destruction.141

Patten and his men confiscated the cannon in Livingston County 21 October. (Baugh, “Call to Arms,” 206–210.)  


It is necessary for a proper understanding of this matter, about the destruction of property, for the reader to know that the saints had bought a heavy portion of Daviess county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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; for which, there are documents now to show, and were to have possession in a short time.142

According to a report by Hiram Parks, a committee of Daviess County citizens was to meet with the Mormons 26 September 1838 to discuss the options of buying Mormon properties or selling their own properties to the Mormons. Sidney Rigdon wrote that these negotiations resulted in the sale of preemption rights to the Mormons, amounting to “some twenty-five thousand dollars worth of property . . . in improvements and crops.” (Hiram Parks, Millport, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, Jefferson City, MO, 25 Sept. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA; [Rigdon], Appeal to the American People, 34.)  


Let it be noticed that the mob, in these burnings, had little to lose; they had got pay, for both their houses, and their lands, and their whole object was, to drive the saints from them, and keep both their lands and their pay; which by the assistance of Governor Lilburn W. Boggs

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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, they have been enabled to do.143

In carrying out Boggs’s order of 27 October 1838 the Missouri militia prevented Latter-day Saints in Caldwell and Daviess counties from traveling to the federal land office at Lexington, Lafayette County, to purchase property to which they held preemption rights. The land was released for purchase by the general public 27 November 1838. (Walker, “Mormon Land Rights,” 37–38; see also Lilburn W. Boggs, Jefferson City, MO, to John B. Clark, Fayette, MO, 27 Oct. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA [also in “History, of the Persecution,” July 1840, 1:129.])  


The mob declared, while they were selling their lands, that they would do so, and if they could not accomplish their object any other way, they would burn their houses, and report the saints had done it. This can be proven by Mr. Uriah B. Powell.144

Powell’s redress petition indicated that about 1 November 1838 in Caldwell County “he had a conversation with a captain of the Militia who was a citizen of Davies County Missouri and who had been engaged in the mob in course of the conversation the said Captain observed that we (speaking of the mob of Davies County) have burnt houses of our own and the mormons on the mormons Credit to accomplish our designs of getting the mormons out of the State.” (Uriah B. Powell, Affidavit, Springfield, IL, 9 Nov. 1839, photocopy, Material Relating to Mormon Expulsion from Missouri, 1839–1843, CHL.)  


After the mob was dispersed, and their cannon taken, the people from Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, returned home, in hopes of having peace; but this hope proved to be vain, for C. Gilliam

13 Apr. 1798–24 Mar. 1848. Politician, military officer. Born near Mount Pisgah, Buncombe Co., North Carolina. Son of Epaphroditus Gilliam and Sarah Ann Israel. Moved to Missouri, before 1820. Married Mary Crawford, 1820/1821, in Ray Co. (later in Clay Co...

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, who had been very active in the mob, and a commander of one of their companies, that was painted, commenced collecting his painted and scattered forces on a stream, that was called the Grindstone. After he had got as he supposed, a sufficient number of them collected and well painted he came into Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, and took cattle and horses &c.; and the people of Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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had to set guards, to protect their property.”—See S. Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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’s History, entitled “An Appeal to the American People”—Page 40.
to be continued. [p. 99]
and what they left behind them, made  a prey of.
Mr. Patten

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

View Full Bio
, at last got so near the  mob, that they left their cannon and  fled. He took the cannon, and returned  to Diawman [Adam-ondi-Ahman]

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

More Info
, and thus ended the scene  of destruction.141

Patten and his men confiscated the cannon in Livingston County 21 October. (Baugh, “Call to Arms,” 206–210.)  


It is necessary for a  proper understanding of this matter,  about the destruction of property, for  the reader to know that the saints had  bought a heavy portion of Daviess  county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
; for which, there are docu ments now to show, and were to have  possession in a short time.142

According to a report by Hiram Parks, a committee of Daviess County citizens was to meet with the Mormons 26 September 1838 to discuss the options of buying Mormon properties or selling their own properties to the Mormons. Sidney Rigdon wrote that these negotiations resulted in the sale of preemption rights to the Mormons, amounting to “some twenty-five thousand dollars worth of property . . . in improvements and crops.” (Hiram Parks, Millport, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, Jefferson City, MO, 25 Sept. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA; [Rigdon], Appeal to the American People, 34.)  


Let it be  noticed that the mob, in these bur nings, had little to lose; they had got  pay, for both their houses, and their  lands, and their whole object was, to  drive the saints from them, and keep  both their lands and their pay; which  by the assistance of Governor [Lilburn W.] Boggs

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

View Full Bio
,  they have been enabled to do.143

In carrying out Boggs’s order of 27 October 1838 the Missouri militia prevented Latter-day Saints in Caldwell and Daviess counties from traveling to the federal land office at Lexington, Lafayette County, to purchase property to which they held preemption rights. The land was released for purchase by the general public 27 November 1838. (Walker, “Mormon Land Rights,” 37–38; see also Lilburn W. Boggs, Jefferson City, MO, to John B. Clark, Fayette, MO, 27 Oct. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA [also in “History, of the Persecution,” July 1840, 1:129.])  


The  mob declared, while they were selling  their lands, that they would do so, and  if they could not accomplish their object  any other way, they would burn their  houses, and report the saints had done  it. This can be proven by Mr. Uriah  B. Powel[l].144

Powell’s redress petition indicated that about 1 November 1838 in Caldwell County “he had a conversation with a captain of the Militia who was a citizen of Davies County Missouri and who had been engaged in the mob in course of the conversation the said Captain observed that we (speaking of the mob of Davies County) have burnt houses of our own and the mormons on the mormons Credit to accomplish our designs of getting the mormons out of the State.” (Uriah B. Powell, Affidavit, Springfield, IL, 9 Nov. 1839, photocopy, Material Relating to Mormon Expulsion from Missouri, 1839–1843, CHL.)  


After the mob was dispersed, and  their cannon taken, the people from  Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
, returned home, in hopes of  having peace; but this hope proved to be  vain, for C. Gilliam

13 Apr. 1798–24 Mar. 1848. Politician, military officer. Born near Mount Pisgah, Buncombe Co., North Carolina. Son of Epaphroditus Gilliam and Sarah Ann Israel. Moved to Missouri, before 1820. Married Mary Crawford, 1820/1821, in Ray Co. (later in Clay Co...

View Full Bio
, who had been  very active in the mob, and a comman der of one of their companies, that was  painted, commenced collecting his pain ted and scattered forces on a stream,  that was called the Grindstone. After  he had got as he supposed, a sufficient  number of them collected and well pain ted he came into Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
, and  took cattle and horses &c.; and the peo ple of Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
had to set guards, to  protect their property.”—See S. Rig don

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
’s History, entitled “An Appeal to  the American People”—Page 40.
to be continued. [p. 99]
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“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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,” in Times and Seasons (Commerce/Nauvoo, IL), vol. 1, nos. 2–12: Dec. 1839, pp. 17–20; Jan. 1840, pp. 33–36; Feb. 1840, pp. 49–51; Mar. 1840, pp. 65–66; Apr. 1840, pp. 81–82; May 1840, pp. 97–99; June 1840, pp. 113–116; July 1840, pp. 129–131; Aug. 1840, pp. 145–150; Sept. 1840, pp. 161–165; Oct. 1840, pp. 177, 184–185; edited by Ebenezer Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

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and Don Carlos Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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. The copy used for transcription is currently part of a bound volume held at CHL; includes light marginalia and archival marking.
Each segment in the eleven-part series begins on the first page of its respective number of the Times and Seasons. Each issue comprises eight leaves (sixteen pages) that measure 8⅝ x 5¼ inches (22 x 13 cm). The text on each page is set in two columns. At some point, the editors of the Times and Seasons reset and reprinted the December 1839 and January 1840 issues of the Times and Seasons; based on textual analysis, the version used for transcription appears to be the earlier typesetting of both.1

See Crawley, Descriptive Bibliography, 1:94–95.  


It is unknown how long this volume has been in church custody.

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