31766

“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

care of them, or from the pain of seeing them starve to death, by stealing them. An arrangement was made in which it was stipulated that a committee of twelve, which had been previously appointed, should have the privilege of going from Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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to Daviess county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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for the term of four weeks, for the purpose of conveying their crops from Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
to Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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. The committee were to wear white badges on their hats for their protectoin.
But in a short time after this arrangement was made, Gen. [Robert] Wilson

Nov. 1800–10 May 1870. Politician, Lawyer, Farmer. Born near Staunton, Augusta Co., Virginia. Moved to Franklin, Howard Co., Missouri Territory, by 1820. Married Margaret (Peggie) Snoddy, 18 May 1826. Served as clerk of circuit and county courts in Randolph...

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withdrew with his army, and the mob rose up as soon as the army had gone, and forbid the Committee from coming again into Daviess county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
under pain of death. By this the mob secured unto themselves several hundred thousand bushels of corn, besides large quantities of oats, and the saints were left to seek their bread and shelter where they could find it.
We will now return to the prisoners in Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
. Shortly after our arrival in Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
, Colonel Sterling Price

Ca. Sept. 1809–29 Sept. 1867. Farmer, merchant, military officer. Born near Farmville, Prince Edward Co., Virginia. Son of Pugh Williamson Price and Elizabeth Marshall Williamson. Moved to Missouri, 1831. Married Martha Head, 14 May 1833, in Randolph Co.,...

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from the army of Gen. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
, came with orders from Gen. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
who was commander-in-chief of the expedition, to have us forwarded forthwith to Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

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. Accordingly, on Thursday morning, November 8th, with three guards only, and they had been obtained with great difficulty, after laboring all the previous day to get them. Between Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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and Roy’s ferry, on the Missouri River

One of longest rivers in North America, in excess of 3,000 miles. From headwaters in Montana to confluence with Mississippi near Saint Louis, Missouri river drains 580,000 square miles (about one-sixth of continental U.S.). Explored by Lewis and Clark, 1804...

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, they all got drunk, and we got possession of their arms and horses. It was late in the afternoon, near the setting of the sun. We travelled about half a mile after we crossed the river, and put up for the night. The next morning there came a number of men some of them armed, their threatenings and savage appearance were such as to make us afraid to proceed without more guards. A messenger was therefore despached to Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
to obtain them. We started before their arrival, but had not gone far before we met Col. Price

Ca. Sept. 1809–29 Sept. 1867. Farmer, merchant, military officer. Born near Farmville, Prince Edward Co., Virginia. Son of Pugh Williamson Price and Elizabeth Marshall Williamson. Moved to Missouri, 1831. Married Martha Head, 14 May 1833, in Randolph Co.,...

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with a guard, if we recollect right of seventy four men. As to the number, however, we are not certain: and were conducted by them to Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
and put into an old vacant house, and a guard set. Sometime through the course of that day, Gen. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
came in and we were introduced to him. We enquired of him the reason why we had been thus carried from our homes and what were the charges against us. He said that he was not then able to determine, but would be in a short time, and with very little more conversasion withdrew. Some short time after he had withdrawn, Col. Price

Ca. Sept. 1809–29 Sept. 1867. Farmer, merchant, military officer. Born near Farmville, Prince Edward Co., Virginia. Son of Pugh Williamson Price and Elizabeth Marshall Williamson. Moved to Missouri, 1831. Married Martha Head, 14 May 1833, in Randolph Co.,...

View Full Bio
came in with two chains in his hands, and a number of padlocks. The two chains he fastened together. He had with him ten men armed, who stood at the time of these operations with a thumb upon the cock of their guns. They first nailed down the windows, then came and ordered a man by the name of John Fulkerson whom he had with him, to chain us together with chains and padlcks, being seven in number. After that, he searched us, examining our pockets to see if we had any arms; finding nothing but pocket knives, he took them and conveyed them off.
General Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
spent several days in searching the statutes of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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to find some authority to hold a Court Martial. (The troops said that he had promised when they left, that there were two or three that they should have the privilege of shooting before they returned.) But he could find none, and after a fruitless search of a number of days he came again to see us and informed us that he would turn us over to the civil authorities for trial. Accordingly, the trial commenced; Austin A King

21 Sept. 1802–22 Apr. 1870. Attorney, judge, politician, farmer. Born at Sullivan Co., Tennessee. Son of Walter King and Nancy Sevier. Married first Nancy Harris Roberts, 13 May 1828, at Jackson, Madison Co., Tennessee. In 1830, moved to Missouri, where he...

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on the bench, and Thomas C. Birch [Burch]

Ca. 1807–ca. Sept. 1839. Attorney, judge. Likely born in Tennessee. Married first Ann Ross, 20 Jan. 1824, at Howard Co., Missouri. Began law practice, 1831, at Richmond, Ray Co., Missouri. Married second Celenary (Selinary) Jacobs, 23 Jan. 1834, at Ray Co...

View Full Bio
, attorney. This was surely a new kind of Court: it was not an inquisition nor yet a criminal court, but a compound between. A looker on would be convinced that both the judge and attorney were not satisfied that some or all of the prisoners had been guilty of some criminal act or acts, but on the contrary that their object was to try by all means in their power to get some person to swear some criminal thing aginst us, through [though] they were innocent.
The first act of the court was to send out a body of armed men, to obtain witnesses without any civil process whatever; and after witnesses were brought before the court, they were sworn at bayonet point. Dr. Sampson Avard

23 Oct. 1800–15 Apr. 1869. Physician. Born at St. Peter, Isle of Guernsey, Channel Islands, Great Britain. Migrated to U.S., by 1830. Married Eliza, a native of Virginia. Located at North Carolina, 1830. Moved to Virginia, by 1831. Moved to Freedom, Beaver...

View Full Bio
was the first brought [p. 162]
care of them, or from the pain of see ing them starve to death, by stealing  them. An arrangement was made in  which it was stipulated that a commit tee of twelve, which had been previous ly appointed, should have the privilege  of going from Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
to Daviess  county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
for the term of four weeks, for  the purpose of conveying their crops  from Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
to Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
.237

The committee of Latter-day Saints responsible to sell and exchange Mormon livestock and crops consisted of William Huntington as foreman, William Earl, Elijah B. Gaylor, William Hale, Henry Herriman, Mayhew Hillman, Henry Humphrey, John Reed, Oliver Snow, Daniel Stanton, Benjamin S. Wilbur, and Z. Wilson. (Huntington, Diaries of William Huntington, 6–7.)  


The com mittee were to wear white badges on  their hats for their protectoin.
But in a short time after this ar rangement was made, Gen. [Robert] Wilson

Nov. 1800–10 May 1870. Politician, Lawyer, Farmer. Born near Staunton, Augusta Co., Virginia. Moved to Franklin, Howard Co., Missouri Territory, by 1820. Married Margaret (Peggie) Snoddy, 18 May 1826. Served as clerk of circuit and county courts in Randolph...

View Full Bio
 withdrew with his army, and the mob  rose up as soon as the army had gone,  and forbid the Committee from coming  again into Daviess county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
under pain  of death. By this the mob secured  unto themselves several hundred thou sand bushels of corn, besides large  quantities of oats, and the saints were  left to seek their bread and shelter  where they could find it.238

William Huntington reported that committee members were allowed to function in Daviess County for only one month, although their permits stated they could continue their efforts throughout the winter. Huntington wrote that they “collected many of our cattle horses sheep waggons and other property” and hauled some corn, but he calculated they were forced to leave 29,465 bushels of corn unharvested. The Latter-day Saints’ preemption rights to the Daviess County lands they occupied lapsed by the third week of November 1838, while military occupation made redeeming them impossible. Within forty-five days of the lapse, other Missourians purchased more than eighteen thousand acres in Daviess County, including all of Adam-ondi-Ahman. The new owners therefore likely had legal support for not allowing Latter-day Saints to harvest crops from properties that had officially changed hands. (Huntington, Diaries of William Huntington, 6–7; see also Walker, “Mormon Land Rights,” 41–46.)  


We will now return to the prisoners  in Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
. Shortly after our  arrival in Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
, Colonel  Sterling Price

Ca. Sept. 1809–29 Sept. 1867. Farmer, merchant, military officer. Born near Farmville, Prince Edward Co., Virginia. Son of Pugh Williamson Price and Elizabeth Marshall Williamson. Moved to Missouri, 1831. Married Martha Head, 14 May 1833, in Randolph Co.,...

View Full Bio
from the army of Gen.  Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
, came with orders from Gen.  Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
who was commander-in-chief of  the expedition, to have us forwarded  forthwith to Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
.239

On 6 November, General Samuel D. Lucas received a copy of Lilburn W. Boggs’s 1 November orders to Clark, which gave the latter overall command of the operation against the Mormons.a Boggs had further instructed that if Lucas wished to lead his own troops in the campaign he was to “waive” his rank and serve as a brigadier general under Clark.b With this clarification of Clark’s superior authority, Lucas surrendered his prisoners at Independence to Lieutenant Colonel Sterling Price, who transported them to Richmond.c  


aSamuel D. Lucas, Independence, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 11 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.

bLilburn W. Boggs, Jefferson City, MO, to John B. Clark, 6 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.

cJohn B. Clark, Jefferson City, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 29 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.

Accordingly,  on Thursday morning, November 8th,  with three guards only, and they had  been obtained with great difficulty, af ter laboring all the previous day to get  them.240

Clark reported that 7 November he sent Sterling Price to Richmond in command of two companies to take custody of the prisoners but that Price had to retrieve them from Independence instead. Evidently Price dismissed his troops before reaching Independence and had difficulty recruiting replacements to accompany him and the prisoners from Independence to Richmond. (John B. Clark, Richmond, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 10 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


Between Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

More Info
and  Roy’s ferry, on the Missouri River

One of longest rivers in North America, in excess of 3,000 miles. From headwaters in Montana to confluence with Mississippi near Saint Louis, Missouri river drains 580,000 square miles (about one-sixth of continental U.S.). Explored by Lewis and Clark, 1804...

More Info
,  they all got drunk, and we got posses sion of their arms and horses. It was  late in the afternoon, near the setting  of the sun. We travelled about half a  mile after we crossed the river, and  put up for the night. The next morn ing there came a number of men some  of them armed, their threatenings and  savage appearance were such as to  make us afraid to proceed without  more guards. A messenger was there fore despached to Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
to obtain  them. We started before their arrival,  but had not gone far before we met  Col. Price

Ca. Sept. 1809–29 Sept. 1867. Farmer, merchant, military officer. Born near Farmville, Prince Edward Co., Virginia. Son of Pugh Williamson Price and Elizabeth Marshall Williamson. Moved to Missouri, 1831. Married Martha Head, 14 May 1833, in Randolph Co.,...

View Full Bio
with a guard, if we recol lect right of seventy four men. As to  the number, however, we are not cer tain: and were conducted by them to  Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
and put into an old vacant  house, and a guard set. Sometime  through the course of that day, Gen.  Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
came in and we were introduced  to him. We enquired of him the rea son why we had been thus carried  from our homes and what were the  charges against us. He said that he  was not then able to determine, but  would be in a short time, and with ve ry little more conversasion withdrew.  Some short time after he had with drawn, Col. Price

Ca. Sept. 1809–29 Sept. 1867. Farmer, merchant, military officer. Born near Farmville, Prince Edward Co., Virginia. Son of Pugh Williamson Price and Elizabeth Marshall Williamson. Moved to Missouri, 1831. Married Martha Head, 14 May 1833, in Randolph Co.,...

View Full Bio
came in with two  chains in his hands, and a number of  padlocks. The two chains he fastened  together. He had with him ten men  armed, who stood at the time of these  operations with a thumb upon the cock  of their guns. They first nailed down  the windows, then came and ordered  a man by the name of John Fulkerson  whom he had with him, to chain us  together with chains and padlcks, be ing seven in number. After that, he  searched us, examining our pockets to  see if we had any arms; finding noth ing but pocket knives, he took them  and conveyed them off.
General Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
spent several days in  searching the statutes of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
to  find some authority to hold a Court  Martial. (The troops said that he had  promised when they left, that there  were two or three that they should  have the privilege of shooting before  they returned.) But he could find  none, and after a fruitless search of a  number of days he came again to see  us and informed us that he would turn  us over to the civil authorities for trial.241

As late as 10 November, Clark was considering the possibility of a court-martial for JS and other Latter-day Saint leaders “as a dernier [last] resort.” That day he wrote to Governor Boggs requesting him to solicit the Missouri attorney general’s opinion on whether the prisoners could be charged with “having mutinied in time of war.”a However, later that same day the prisoners were informed that their case would be considered by civil authorities. Hyrum Smith and Lyman Wight reported that Clark also sought information from Fort Leavenworth about any applicable provisions in military law.b By the time Boggs responded on 19 November that “the Civil law must govern,”c the court of inquiry, or preliminary hearing, for JS and the other Latter-day Saint leaders had been underway for a week.  


aJohn B. Clark, Richmond, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 10 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.

bHyrum Smith, Testimony, Nauvoo, IL, 1 July 1843, pp. 17–18, Nauvoo, IL, Records, CHL; History of the Reorganized Church, 2:297.

cLilburn W. Boggs, Jefferson City, MO, to John B. Clark, 19 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.

 Accordingly, the trial commenced;  Austin A King

21 Sept. 1802–22 Apr. 1870. Attorney, judge, politician, farmer. Born at Sullivan Co., Tennessee. Son of Walter King and Nancy Sevier. Married first Nancy Harris Roberts, 13 May 1828, at Jackson, Madison Co., Tennessee. In 1830, moved to Missouri, where he...

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on the bench, and  Thomas C. Birch [Burch]

Ca. 1807–ca. Sept. 1839. Attorney, judge. Likely born in Tennessee. Married first Ann Ross, 20 Jan. 1824, at Howard Co., Missouri. Began law practice, 1831, at Richmond, Ray Co., Missouri. Married second Celenary (Selinary) Jacobs, 23 Jan. 1834, at Ray Co...

View Full Bio
, attorney. This  was surely a new kind of Court: it  was not an inquisition nor yet a crimi nal court, but a compound between. A  looker on would be convinced that both  the judge and attorney were not satis fied that some or all of the prisoners  had been guilty of some criminal act or  acts, but on the contrary that their ob ject was to try by all means in their  power to get some person to swear  some criminal thing aginst us, through [though]  they were innocent.242

The task of the court of inquiry, which commenced 12 November 1838, was to determine not guilt or innocence, but whether there was “probable cause to believe the prisoner guilty” of an offense. If probable cause was found, the case was to be tried at the next term of the appropriate court. (An Act to Regulate Proceedings in Criminal Cases [21 Mar. 1835], Revised Statutes of the State of Missouri, pp. 476–477, art. 2, sec. 22.)  


The first act of the court was to  send out a body of armed men, to ob tain witnesses without any civil pro cess whatever;243

Hyrum Smith later contradicted Sidney Rigdon on this point, testifying that subpoenas were issued for about forty witnesses for the defense. (Hyrum Smith, Testimony, Nauvoo, IL, 1 July 1843, p. 18, Nauvoo, IL, Records, CHL.)  


and after witnesses  were brought before the court, they  were sworn at bayonet point. Dr.  Sampson Avard

23 Oct. 1800–15 Apr. 1869. Physician. Born at St. Peter, Isle of Guernsey, Channel Islands, Great Britain. Migrated to U.S., by 1830. Married Eliza, a native of Virginia. Located at North Carolina, 1830. Moved to Virginia, by 1831. Moved to Freedom, Beaver...

View Full Bio
was the first brought [p. 162]
PreviousNext
“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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,” in Times and Seasons (Commerce/Nauvoo, IL), vol. 1, nos. 2–12: Dec. 1839, pp. 17–20; Jan. 1840, pp. 33–36; Feb. 1840, pp. 49–51; Mar. 1840, pp. 65–66; Apr. 1840, pp. 81–82; May 1840, pp. 97–99; June 1840, pp. 113–116; July 1840, pp. 129–131; Aug. 1840, pp. 145–150; Sept. 1840, pp. 161–165; Oct. 1840, pp. 177, 184–185; edited by Ebenezer Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

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and Don Carlos Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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. The copy used for transcription is currently part of a bound volume held at CHL; includes light marginalia and archival marking.
Each segment in the eleven-part series begins on the first page of its respective number of the Times and Seasons. Each issue comprises eight leaves (sixteen pages) that measure 8⅝ x 5¼ inches (22 x 13 cm). The text on each page is set in two columns. At some point, the editors of the Times and Seasons reset and reprinted the December 1839 and January 1840 issues of the Times and Seasons; based on textual analysis, the version used for transcription appears to be the earlier typesetting of both.1

See Crawley, Descriptive Bibliography, 1:94–95.  


It is unknown how long this volume has been in church custody.

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