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“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840


Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, Oct. 1840, 1:184–185. A section of editorial notes in the October 1840 issue of the Times and Seasons, placed several pages after the concluding installment of “History, of the Persecution,” includes the following postscript and endorsement. The author was probably one of the editors of the journal, Ebenezer Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

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or Don Carlos Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

View Full Bio
.

We this month conclude the history of the persecution of the church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, by inserting in our columns the memorable speech of Maj. Gen. John B. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

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to our brethren at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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—and sure never a more, unconstitutional and bloody address, blackened the pages of history. The sentiments contained in it are such as make every lover of freedom, every patriotic American citizen, as well as all civilized men throughout the world, capable of appreciating the blessings of freedom, to look upon its author with contempt. Not only does he charge them with crimes, of which they were never guilty but says that if they did not leave the state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
they “need not expect mercy, but extermination.” This was the language of a man high in authority in that state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, and for the noble feats he then performed, has since sought the suffrages of the Missourians to be elevated to the gubernatorial chair of that state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
.272

John B. Clark was the Whig candidate for governor of Missouri in the 5 August 1840 election. He was defeated by Thomas Reynolds. (Shepard, Early History of St. Louis and Missouri, 153; History of Greene County, Missouri, 192.)  


Sure such a governor would shed a darker polish on the blackened aspect of that disgraced state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
. For whenever he had a desire to persecute any one or bring them to condign punishment, guilty or not guilty “whatever your innocence is, it is nothing to me” your “fate is fixed, your die is cast, your doom is sealed.” This would be carrying out the principle which he then avowed and in which he was supported by the citizens of that state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
.
We are knowing to most of the circumstances, mentioned in the history of the persecutions, and that a correct account has been given, which, has been proven from time to time, these things have been placed before the legislature of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, but they have refused to investigate them,273

John Corrill presented two Latter-day Saint memorials to the Missouri state legislature on 19 December 1838 and moved that they be referred to a joint committee that had been assigned to investigate the recent “Mormon difficulties.” The legislative investigation of Mormon grievances was ultimately abandoned. (See Corrill, Brief History, 44.)  


they have [p. 184]

Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, Oct. 1840, 1:184–185. A section of editorial notes in the October 1840 issue of the Times and Seasons, placed several pages after the concluding installment of “History, of the Persecution,” includes the following postscript and endorsement. The author was probably one of the editors of the journal, Ebenezer Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

View Full Bio
or Don Carlos Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

View Full Bio
.

We this month conclude the history  of the persecution of the church of Je sus Christ of Latter day Saints in Mis souri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, by inserting in our columns the  memorable speech of Maj. Gen. [John B.] Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
 to our brethren at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
—and sure  never a more, unconstitutional and  bloody address, blackened the pages of  history. The sentiments contained in  it are such as make every lover of free dom, every patriotic American citizen,  as well as all civilized men throughout  the world, capable of appreciating the  blessings of freedom, to look upon its  author with contempt. Not only does  he charge them with crimes, of which  they were never guilty but says that if  they did not leave the state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
they “need  not expect mercy, but extermination.”  This was the language of a man high  in authority in that state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, and for the  noble feats he then performed, has  since sought the suffrages of the Mis sourians to be elevated to the guberna torial chair of that state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
.272

John B. Clark was the Whig candidate for governor of Missouri in the 5 August 1840 election. He was defeated by Thomas Reynolds. (Shepard, Early History of St. Louis and Missouri, 153; History of Greene County, Missouri, 192.)  


Sure such a  governor would shed a darker polish  on the blackened aspect of that disgrac ed state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
. For whenever he had a de sire to persecute any one or bring them  to condign punishment, guilty or not  guilty “whatever your innocence is, it  is nothing to me” your “fate is fixed,  your die is cast, your doom is sealed.”  This would be carrying out the princi ple which he then avowed and in which  he was supported by the citizens of that  state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
.
We are knowing to most of the cir cumstances, mentioned in the history  of the persecutions, and that a correct  account has been given, which, has  been proven from time to time, these  things have been placed before the leg islature of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, but they have re fused to investigate them,273

John Corrill presented two Latter-day Saint memorials to the Missouri state legislature on 19 December 1838 and moved that they be referred to a joint committee that had been assigned to investigate the recent “Mormon difficulties.” The legislative investigation of Mormon grievances was ultimately abandoned. (See Corrill, Brief History, 44.)  


they have [p. 184]
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“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
,” in Times and Seasons (Commerce/Nauvoo, IL), vol. 1, nos. 2–12: Dec. 1839, pp. 17–20; Jan. 1840, pp. 33–36; Feb. 1840, pp. 49–51; Mar. 1840, pp. 65–66; Apr. 1840, pp. 81–82; May 1840, pp. 97–99; June 1840, pp. 113–116; July 1840, pp. 129–131; Aug. 1840, pp. 145–150; Sept. 1840, pp. 161–165; Oct. 1840, pp. 177, 184–185; edited by Ebenezer Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

View Full Bio
and Don Carlos Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

View Full Bio
. The copy used for transcription is currently part of a bound volume held at CHL; includes light marginalia and archival marking.
Each segment in the eleven-part series begins on the first page of its respective number of the Times and Seasons. Each issue comprises eight leaves (sixteen pages) that measure 8⅝ x 5¼ inches (22 x 13 cm). The text on each page is set in two columns. At some point, the editors of the Times and Seasons reset and reprinted the December 1839 and January 1840 issues of the Times and Seasons; based on textual analysis, the version used for transcription appears to be the earlier typesetting of both.1

See Crawley, Descriptive Bibliography, 1:94–95.  


It is unknown how long this volume has been in church custody.

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