26023

“Church History,” 1 March 1842

same ordinances, gifts, powers, and blessing, as was enjoyed on the eastern continent, that the people were cut off in consequence of their transgressions, that the last of their prophets who existed among them was commanded to write an abridgement of their prophesies, history &c., and to hide it up in the earth, and that it should come forth and be united with the bible for the accomplishment of the purposes of God in the last days. For a more particular account I would refer to the Book of Mormon, which can be purchased at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, or from any of our travelling elders.
As soon as the news of this discovery was made known, false reports, misrepresentation and slander flew as on the wings of the wind in every direction, the house was frequently beset by mobs, and evil designing persons, several times I was shot at, and very narrowly escaped, and every device was made use of to get the plates away from me, but the power and blessing of God attended me, and several began to believe my testimony.
On the 6th of April, 1830, the “Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints,” was first organized in the town of Manchester

Settled 1793. Formed as Burt Township when divided from Farmington Township, 31 Mar. 1821. Name changed to Manchester, 16 Apr. 1822. Included village of Manchester. Population in 1825 about 2,700. Population in 1830 about 2,800. JS reported first vision of...

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, Ontario co., state of New York. Some few were called and ordained by the spirit of revelation, and prophesy, and began to preach as the spirit gave them utterance, and though weak, yet were they strengthened by the power of God, and many were brought to repentance, were immersed in the water, and were filled with the Holy Ghost by the laying on of hands. They saw visions and prophesied, devils were cast out and the sick healed by the laying on of hands. From that time the work rolled forth with astonishing rapidity, and churches were soon formed in the states of New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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, Pennsylvania

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

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, Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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, Indiana, Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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and Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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; in the last named state a considerable settlement was formed in Jackson co.

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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; numbers joined the church and we were increasing rapidly; we made large purchases of land, our farms teemed with plenty, and peace and happiness was enjoyed in our domestic circle and throughout our neighborhood; but as we could not associate with our neighbors who were many of them of the basest of men and had fled from the face of civilized society, to the frontier country to escape the hand of justice, in their midnight revels, their sabbath breaking, horseracing, and gambling, they commenced at first ridicule, then to persecute, and finally an organized mob assembled and burned our houses, tarred, and feathered, and whipped many of our brethren and finally drove them from their habitations; who houseless, and homeless, contrary to law, justice and humanity, had to wander on the bleak prairies till the children left the tracks of their blood on the prairie, this took place in the month of November, and they had no other covering but the canopy of heaven, in this inclement season of the year; this proceeding was winked at by the government and although we had warrantee deeds for our land, and had violated no law we could obtain no redress.
There were many sick, who were thus inhumanly driven from their houses, and had to endure all this abuse and to seek homes where they could be found. The result was, that a great many of them being deprived of the comforts of life, and the necessary attendances, died; many children were left orphans; wives, widows; and husbands widowers.—Our farms were taken possession of by the mob, many thousands of cattle, sheep, horses, and hogs, were taken and our household goods, store goods, and printing press, and type were broken, taken, or otherwise destroyed.
Many of our brethren removed to Clay

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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where they continued until 1836, three years; there was no violence offered but there were threatnings of violence. But in the summer of 1836, these threatnings began to assume a more serious form; from threats, public meetings were called, resolutions were passed, vengeance and destruction were threatened, and affairs again assumed a fearful attitude, Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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was a sufficient precedent, and as the authorities in that county did not interfere, they boasted that they would not in this, which on application to the authorities we found to be too true, and after much violence, privation and loss of property we were again driven from our homes.
We next settled in Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, and Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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counties, where we made large and extensive settlements, thinking to free ourselves from the power of oppression, by settling in new counties, with very few inhabitants in them; but here we were not allowed to live in peace, but in 1838 we were again attacked by mobs [p. 708]
same ordinances, gifts, powers, and bles sing, as was enjoyed on the eastern conti nent, that the people were cut off in con sequence of their transgressions, that the  last of their prophets who existed among  them was commanded to write an abridge ment of their prophesies, history &c.,  and to hide it up in the earth, and that  it should come forth and be united with  the bible for the accomplishment of the  purposes of God in the last days. For  a more particular account I would refer  to the Book of Mormon, which can be  purchased at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, or from any of our  travelling elders.
As soon as the news of this discovery  was made known, false reports, misre presentation and slander flew as on the  wings of the wind in every direction, the  house was frequently beset by mobs, and  evil designing persons, several times I  was shot at, and very narrowly escaped,  and every device was made use of to get  the plates away from me, but the power  and blessing of God attended me, and  several began to believe my testimony.
On the 6th of April, 1830, the “Church  of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints,”  was first organized in the town of Man chester

Settled 1793. Formed as Burt Township when divided from Farmington Township, 31 Mar. 1821. Name changed to Manchester, 16 Apr. 1822. Included village of Manchester. Population in 1825 about 2,700. Population in 1830 about 2,800. JS reported first vision of...

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, Ontario co., state of New York.8

JS organized the church in 1830 as the “Church of Christ”; an 1838 revelation established the full name of the church as used here.a The earliest sources place the meeting at Fayette, New York, and later JS documents support this designation.b Some later documents, including the present history, locate the meeting at Manchester. The discrepancy may originate with William W. Phelps, who was not involved with the church at the time of its organization and therefore appears to have misidentified the location. While preparing the Book of Commandments for publication based on Revelation Book 1, the editors (who included Phelps) added “given in Manchester, NY” to a 6 April 1830 revelation in chapter 22.c Records linked to Phelps or Orson Pratt (who was also not present at the church’s organizational meeting and who later spoke of Fayette as the correct location) state that the 6 April meeting took place in Manchester.d Later printings of the Doctrine and Covenants and Pratt’s Interesting Account either omit references to Manchester as the site or revise the meeting place to Fayette.e  


aArticles and Covenants, ca. Apr. 1830, in Doctrine and Covenants 2:1, 1835 ed. [D&C 20:1]; Revelation, 26 Apr. 1838, in JS, Journal, 26 Apr. 1838 [D&C 115:3–4].

bRevelation, 6 Apr. 1830, in Revelation Book 1, p. 28 [D&C 21]; JS History, vol. A-1, 37.

cSee Book of Commandments 22 [D&C 21]; compare Revelation Book 1, pp. 28–29.

d“Prospects of the Church,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Mar. 1833, [4]; Pratt, Interesting Account, 23; Orson Pratt, in Journal of Discourses, 7 Oct. 1869, 13:193.

eDoctrine and Covenants 45–46, 1835 ed. [D&C 21, 23]; Pratt, Remarkable Visions, 12.

 Some few were called and ordained by  the spirit of revelation, and prophesy,  and began to preach as the spirit gave  them utterance, and though weak, yet  were they strengthened by the power of  God, and many were brought to repen tance, were immersed in the water, and  were filled with the Holy Ghost by the  laying on of hands. They saw visions  and prophesied, devils were cast out and  the sick healed by the laying on of hands.  From that time the work rolled forth with  astonishing rapidity, and churches were  soon formed in the states of New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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,  Pennsylvania

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

More Info
, Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

More Info
, Indiana, Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

More Info
and  Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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; in the last named state a con siderable settlement was formed in Jack son co.

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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; numbers joined the church and  we were increasing rapidly; we made  large purchases of land, our farms teem ed with plenty, and peace and happiness  was enjoyed in our domestic circle and  throughout our neighborhood; but as we  could not associate with our neighbors  who were many of them of the basest of  men and had fled from the face of civ ilized society, to the frontier country to  escape the hand of justice, in their mid night revels, their sabbath breaking,  horseracing, and gambling, they com menced at first ridicule, then to persecute,  and finally an organized mob assembled  and burned our houses, tarred, and feath ered, and whipped many of our brethren  and finally drove them from their habita tions; who houseless, and homeless, con trary to law, justice and humanity, had  to wander on the bleak prairies till the  children left the tracks of their blood on  the prairie, this took place in the month  of November, and they had no other  covering but the canopy of heaven, in  this inclement season of the year; this  proceeding was winked at by the govern ment and although we had warrantee  deeds for our land, and had violated no  law we could obtain no redress.
There were many sick, who were thus  inhumanly driven from their houses, and  had to endure all this abuse and to seek  homes where they could be found. The  result was, that a great many of them  being deprived of the comforts of life,  and the necessary attendances, died;  many children were left orphans; wives,  widows; and husbands widowers.—Our  farms were taken possession of by the  mob, many thousands of cattle, sheep,  horses, and hogs, were taken and our  household goods, store goods, and print ing press, and type were broken, taken,  or otherwise destroyed.
Many of our brethren removed to  Clay

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
where they continued until 1836,  three years; there was no violence offer ed but there were threatnings of violence.  But in the summer of 1836, these threat nings began to assume a more serious  form; from threats, public meetings were  called, resolutions were passed, ven geance and destruction were threatened,  and affairs again assumed a fearful atti tude, Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
was a sufficient  precedent, and as the authorities in that  county did not interfere, they boasted  that they would not in this, which on ap plication to the authorities we found to  be too true, and after much violence,  privation and loss of property we were  again driven from our homes.9

Although some of the original settlers of Clay County were determined to see the Latter-day Saints leave the county, the conditions surrounding the Saints’ departure were markedly less violent than was the earlier episode in Jackson County. (See Parkin, “History of the Latter-day Saints in Clay County,” chap. 8.)  


We next settled in Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
, and Da vies[s]

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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counties, where we made large and  extensive settlements, thinking to free  ourselves from the power of oppression,  by settling in new counties, with very  few inhabitants in them; but here we  were not allowed to live in peace, but in  1838 we were again attacked by mobs [p. 708]
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JS, “Church History,” in Times and Seasons (Nauvoo, IL), 1 Mar. 1842, vol. 3, no. 9 (whole no. 45), pp. 706–710; edited by JS; includes typeset signature. The copy used for transcription is currently part of a bound volume held at CHL; includes later underlining.
The five-page article is the second item in this number of the Times and Seasons. The issue comprises eight leaves, making sixteen pages that measure 9 x 5¾ inches (23 x 15 cm). The text on each page is set in two columns. The copy used for transcription has apparently been in continuous church custody since its purchase in the early twentieth century.1

A previous owner’s bookplate and stamp are found on the inside front cover, as is the selling price of the volume, marked in graphite now erased. A blank flyleaf has the same previous owner’s stamp.  


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