43990396

Doctrine and Covenants, 1844

tice should be sought for and upheld by the voice of the people, (if a republic,) or the will of the sovereign.
4 We believe that religion is instituted of God, and that men are amenable to him and to him only for the exercise of it, unless their religious opinion prompts them to infringe upon the rights and liberties of others; but we do not believe that human law has a right to interfere in prescribing rules of worship to bind the consciences of men, nor dictate forms for public or private devotion; that the civil magistrate should restrain crime, but never control conscience; should punish guilt, but never suppress the freedom of the soul.
5 We believe that all men are bound to sustain and uphold the respective governments in which they reside, while protected in their inherent and inalienable rights by the laws of such governments, and that sedition and rebellion are unbecoming every citizen thus protected, and should be punished acccordingly; and that all governments have a right to enact such laws as in their own judgments are best calculated to secure the public interest, at the same time, however, holding sacred the freedom of conscience.
6 We believe that every man should be honored in his station: rulers and magistrates as such—being placed for the protection of the innocent and the punishment of the guilty; and that to the laws all men owe respect and deference, as without them peace and harmony would be supplanted by anarchy and [p. 441]
tice should be sought for and upheld by the  voice of the people, (if a republic,) or the will  of the sovereign.
4 We believe that religion is instituted of  God, and that men are amenable to him and  to him only for the exercise of it, unless their  religious opinion prompts them to infringe up on the rights and liberties of others; but we  do not believe that human law has a right to  interfere in prescribing rules of worship to  bind the consciences of men, nor dictate  forms for public or private devotion; that the  civil magistrate should restrain crime, but  never control conscience; should punish  guilt, but never suppress the freedom of the  soul.
5 We believe that all men are bound to  sustain and uphold the respective govern ments in which they reside, while protected  in their inherent and inalienable rights by the  laws of such governments, and that sedition  and rebellion are unbecoming every citizen  thus protected, and should be punished ac ccordingly; and that all governments have a  right to enact such laws as in their own judg ments are best calculated to secure the public  interest, at the same time, however, holding  sacred the freedom of conscience.
6 We believe that every man should be  honored in his station: rulers and magistrates  as such—being placed for the protection of  the innocent and the punishment of the guil ty; and that to the laws all men owe respect  and deference, as without them peace and har mony would be supplanted by anarchy and [p. 441]
PreviousNext
The Doctrine and Covenants of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints; Carefully Selected from the Revelations of God. By Joseph Smith, President of Said Church. 2nd ed. Nauvoo, IL: John Taylor, 1844; 3–448; includes typeset signature marks and copyright notice. The copy presented herein is held at CHL; includes marginalia and archival markings.
All but the final gathering of this book was printed in octodecimo format on thirteen sheets that were cut and folded into thirteen gatherings of eighteen leaves (thirty-six pages) each. The final gathering comprises eight leaves (sixteen pages). The text block measures 5⅞ × 3⅝ inches (15 × 9 cm).
The copy of the book presented herein is in a presentation binding of red sheepskin with gilt edges. The volume measures 6 × 3⅞ × 1 inches (15 × 10 × 3 cm). The spine is stamped with gilt ornamental panels and “Doctrine | and | Covenants” and “J. Glenn.” in gilt. The front and back pastedowns, the front flyleaf, and the back flyleaf are single-sided marbled leaves featuring a shell pattern with brown body and veins of red and white. In this copy, the first leaf of the first gathering, which is blank in other extant copies, is missing. The verso of the front flyleaf has two inscriptions, the first in graphite and the second in ink: “RN 69025 | Vault | Book Area | M223.1 | D632 | 1844” and “Jane Glenn | from her friend | Leonora Taylor | Nauvoo Oct 27th | 1844”. The handwriting of the first inscription is unknown; Leonora Taylor inscribed the second.
As the aforementioned ink inscription indicates, Leonora Taylor, wife of early church leader and printer John Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

View Full Bio
, presented this book to Jane Glenn. The book came into the possession of the Historical Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints circa 1983.

Facts