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Doctrine and Covenants, 1844

Section 105 • Letter to “All the Saints in Nauvoo,” 1 September 1842 [D&C 127]

SECTION CV.
 
Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, September 1, 1842.
 
To all the Saints in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
:—
1 Forasmuch as the Lord has revealed unto me that my enemies, both of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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and this State

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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, were again on the pursuit of me; and inasmuch as they pursue me without cause, and have not the least shadow, or coloring of justice or right on their side, in the getting up of their prosecutions against me: and inasmuch as their pretensions are all founded in falsehood, of the blackest die, I have thought it expedient, and wisdom in me to leave the place for a short season, for my own safety and the safety of this people. I would say to all those with whom I have business, that I have left my affairs with agents and clerks, who will transact all business in a prompt and proper manner; and will see that all my debts are cancelled in due time, by turning out property, or otherwise as the case may require, or as the circumstances may admit of. When I learn that the storm is fully blown over, then I will return to you again.
2 And as for the perils which I am called to pass through, they seem but a small thing to me, as the envy and wrath of man have been my common lot all the days of my life; and for what cause it seems mysterious, unless I was ordained from before the foundation of the world, for some good end, or bad as you may choose to call it. Judge ye for yourselves. God knoweth all these things, [p. 418]

Section 105 • Letter to “All the Saints in Nauvoo,” 1 September 1842 [D&C 127]

SECTION CV.
 
Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, September 1, 1842.
 
To all the Saints in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
:—
1 Forasmuch as the Lord has revealed un to me that my enemies, both of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
and  this State

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

More Info
, were again on the pursuit of me;  and inasmuch as they pursue me without cause,  and have not the least shadow, or coloring of  justice or right on their side, in the getting up  of their prosecutions against me: and inas much as their pretensions are all founded in  falsehood, of the blackest die, I have thought  it expedient, and wisdom in me to leave the  place for a short season, for my own safety  and the safety of this people. I would say to  all those with whom I have business, that I  have left my affairs with agents and clerks,  who will transact all business in a prompt and  proper manner; and will see that all my debts  are cancelled in due time, by turning out  property, or otherwise as the case may re quire, or as the circumstances may admit of.  When I learn that the storm is fully blown  over, then I will return to you again.
2 And as for the perils which I am called  to pass through, they seem but a small thing  to me, as the envy and wrath of man have  been my common lot all the days of my life;  and for what cause it seems mysterious, un less I was ordained from before the founda tion of the world, for some good end, or bad  as you may choose to call it. Judge ye for  yourselves. God knoweth all these things, [p. 418]
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The Doctrine and Covenants of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints; Carefully Selected from the Revelations of God. By Joseph Smith, President of Said Church. 2nd ed. Nauvoo, IL: John Taylor, 1844; 3–448; includes typeset signature marks and copyright notice. The copy presented herein is held at CHL; includes marginalia and archival markings.
All but the final gathering of this book was printed in octodecimo format on thirteen sheets that were cut and folded into thirteen gatherings of eighteen leaves (thirty-six pages) each. The final gathering comprises eight leaves (sixteen pages). The text block measures 5⅞ × 3⅝ inches (15 × 9 cm).
The copy of the book presented herein is in a presentation binding of red sheepskin with gilt edges. The volume measures 6 × 3⅞ × 1 inches (15 × 10 × 3 cm). The spine is stamped with gilt ornamental panels and “Doctrine | and | Covenants” and “J. Glenn.” in gilt. The front and back pastedowns, the front flyleaf, and the back flyleaf are single-sided marbled leaves featuring a shell pattern with brown body and veins of red and white. In this copy, the first leaf of the first gathering, which is blank in other extant copies, is missing. The verso of the front flyleaf has two inscriptions, the first in graphite and the second in ink: “RN 69025 | Vault | Book Area | M223.1 | D632 | 1844” and “Jane Glenn | from her friend | Leonora Taylor | Nauvoo Oct 27th | 1844”. The handwriting of the first inscription is unknown; Leonora Taylor inscribed the second.
As the aforementioned ink inscription indicates, Leonora Taylor, wife of early church leader and printer John Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

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, presented this book to Jane Glenn. The book came into the possession of the Historical Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints circa 1983.

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