53992722

Edward Partridge, History, Manuscript, circa 1839

baptist priests. The rev. Isaac McCoy

13 June 1784–21 June 1846. Preacher, surveyor, secretary, author, wheelwright. Born near Uniontown, Fayette Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William McCoy and Elizabeth. Moved to North Bend, Northwest Territory (later in Hamilton Co., Ohio), 1789, and to Jefferson...

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headed one of about 60 or 70 the other co. was from 30 to 40 The priests name not recollected they went forth through the different Settlement of the saints threatening them with death and destruction if they were not off immediately, they stripped the brn even to penknnives of all their arms they could find &c they broke open houses where they found them shut and pillaged them
The men were mostly from home that day making arrangements for getting away. The mobs whipped, and shot at some and others they hunted foras they said to kill them. Such mobs well lined with whisky as they were looking & acting worse than savages were well calculated to frighten women and children which they effectually did in some cases one settlement was so frightened that a party of from 130 to 150 women & children not waiting the return of their husbands & fathers left forthwith with only 5 or 6 men to protect them on foot without taking any of their things and wandered forth south a number of days under the broad canopy of heaven not knowing which way the church was a going to go. The stubs of the newly burnt grass & weeds were so hard that they cut the feet of those who had no shoes so that many of them became very sore and bled profusely. Others fled towards the Mo. river

One of longest rivers in North America, in excess of 3,000 miles. From headwaters in Montana to confluence with Mississippi River near Saint Louis, Missouri River drains 580,000 square miles (about one-sixth of continental U.S.). Explored by Lewis and Clark...

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, and in the course of a short time the most of the church were under way for Clay Co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, some few went E. and others south Everetts ferry on the road leading from Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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to Clay Co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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was thronged for near two weeks in crossing the Saints besides what crossed above & below. After some of the head men had left the Co.

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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and the Saints were generally getting under way the mobs in a measure ceased to harrass them. The people of Clay Co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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received the Saints with as much hospitality as could be expected
The most of the Saints saved much of their property but their losses and sacrifices were still very great in the destruction of crops, furniture, clothing &c. & their loss of stock Their grain & many other things would not bear transportation & pay ferrying across the Mo. River

One of longest rivers in North America, in excess of 3,000 miles. From headwaters in Montana to confluence with Mississippi River near Saint Louis, Missouri River drains 580,000 square miles (about one-sixth of continental U.S.). Explored by Lewis and Clark...

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consequently was either sold at a great sacrifice or left without selling though some who had not much else to do & were permitted to return moved the principal of their effects notwithstanding it might be at a loss reckoning their time & all expences
Four aged families whose penury & infirmaties forbade a speedy removal & who did not remove with the rest of the church thinking that probably they might be permitted to winter in Jackson

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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as they were to old to be very dangerous the youngest man of this 4 being 65 but the last of Dec. they were driven from their houses by a mob party man being 65 years who broke in their windows & doors, hurling large Stones into their houses whereby some of their lives were greatly endangered. “Some of these men have toiled & bled in the defence of their country

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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; and old Mr Jones, one of the sufferers, served as life guard to Genl. . Washington in the revolutionary war.”
After it was thought that the mob spirit had died away some 5 or 6 families moved back from Van Buren Co. to their former homes in Jackson

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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where what they had for the sustenence of themeslves & stock was. They had not been long back before a mob party visited them in the night and beat some of the men with chairs & clubs till life was nearly extinct and then left them for dead. one by the name of Leonard was a long time recovering [p. [14]]
baptist priests. The rev. Isaac McCoy

13 June 1784–21 June 1846. Preacher, surveyor, secretary, author, wheelwright. Born near Uniontown, Fayette Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William McCoy and Elizabeth. Moved to North Bend, Northwest Territory (later in Hamilton Co., Ohio), 1789, and to Jefferson...

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headed a co. <one> of about 60 or 70  the other’s co. was about <from> 30 to 40 <The priests name not recollected> they went forth through the different  Settlement of the saints threatening them with death and destruction  if they were not off immediately, demanding their arms <they even stripped the brn <even to penkn[n]ives> of all the<ir> farms they could find> <&c they broke> & breaking  open houses where they found them shut and pillaging pillaged of them
The men were mostly from home that <day> making arrangements for get ting away. The mobs whipped, <and shot at> some and others they hunted after <for> as they said to kill them. Such mobs well lined with whisky <as they> were  <and looking & acting worse than savages> were well calculated to frighten women and children which they  <effectually> did in some cases effectually one settlement was so frightened that  <a party of> from 130 to 150 women & children <not waiting the return of their husbands & fathers> left forthwith <with <only> 5 or 6 men to protect them on foot> without taking  any <of their> things and wandered forth <south a number of days under the broad canopy of heaven> not knowing  which way the church was a going to go. The <stubs of the> newly burnt grass & <weeds>  were so hard that <they> cut the feet of those who had no shoes so that many  of them bled and became very sore and bled profusely. Many <O[t]hers> fled towards  the Mo. river

One of longest rivers in North America, in excess of 3,000 miles. From headwaters in Montana to confluence with Mississippi River near Saint Louis, Missouri River drains 580,000 square miles (about one-sixth of continental U.S.). Explored by Lewis and Clark...

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, and in the course of a short time <the most of the church> were under way for  Clay Co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, some few went E. and others south Everetts ferry <on the road> leading from  Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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to Clay Co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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was thronged for near two weeks in crossing the  Saints besides what crossed above & below. After some of the head  men <had> left the Co.

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
and the Saints were generally getting under way  the mobs ceased in a measure <ceased> to harrass them. The people of Clay Co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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 received the Saints with as much hospitality as could be expected
The most of the Saints saved much of their moveable property  <still> but their losses and sacrifices were <still> very great <in the destruction of crops, furniture, clothing &c. & their loss of stock> Their grain <& many other things> would  not bear transportation & pay ferr[y]ing across the Mo. River

One of longest rivers in North America, in excess of 3,000 miles. From headwaters in Montana to confluence with Mississippi River near Saint Louis, Missouri River drains 580,000 square miles (about one-sixth of continental U.S.). Explored by Lewis and Clark...

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consequently was  either sold <at a great sacrifice> for what it would fetch <bring> which was but a trifle or left without selling  though some <who had teams & not much else to do & were permitted to return> moved the principal of their effects notwiths[t]anding have <it might be at a [illegible]> loss  reckoning their time & all expences
Four aged families the youngest man being 65 years <old> of age whose penury  & infirmaties forbade a speedy removal <& who did not remove with the rest of the church thinking> thought that probably they might be per mitted to winter in Jackson

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
<as they were to old to be very dangerous the youngest man of this 4 being 65> but in <the last of> Dec. they were driven from their  houses by a mob party <man being 65 years> who broke in their windows & doors, hurling  large rocks Stones into their houses whereby <some of> their lives were greatly endan gered. “Some of these men have toiled & bled in the defence of their  country

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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; and old Mr Jones, one of the sufferers, served as life guard to  Genl. Geo. Washington in the revolutionary war.”
In the winter After as <it> was thought <that> the mob <spirit> had died away some 5 or 6  families moved back from Van Buren Co. to Jack

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
their former homes in Jackson

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
 where what they had for the sustenence of themeslves & stock was. They  had not been long back before a mob party visited them in the night  and took the men some of whom <and> they beat <some of the men> with chairs & clubs till life  was nearly extinct and <then> left them for dead. one <by the name of Leonard> was a long time recov ering [p. [14]]
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While incarcerated at Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Missouri, in March 1839, JS addressed a letter to the Saints and to “Bishop [Edward] Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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in particular” in which he called for the Saints to gather up “a knoledge of all the facts and sufferings and abuses put upon them” in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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that they might publish the records “to all the world” and “present them to the heads of the government.” (JS et al., Liberty, MO, to the church members and Edward Partridge, Quincy, IL, 20 Mar. 1839, in Revelations Collection, CHL [D&C 123:1, 6].) Apparently in response to this assignment, Edward Partridge wrote a history that became the first three installments of “A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” an eleven-part series published in the church’s Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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newspaper, Times and Seasons, between December 1839 and October 1840.
Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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may have intended to tell the entire Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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story himself, but he fell ill shortly after publication began and died 27 May 1840. Partridge’s manuscript, which he did not title, is provided here. The full text of “A History, of the Persecution,” which necessarily relied on other sources following Partridge’s demise, will receive comprehensive treatment in volume 2 of the Histories series of The Joseph Smith Papers and will eventually be posted to this website.
Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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’s history begins with his account of the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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conflicts in the early 1830s. Partridge was a bishop of the church in Missouri, first in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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and then in Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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following the Saints’ expulsion from Jackson County. He also served as bishop in Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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after the Saints relocated there from Clay County in 1836. By the time he drafted his account of the Mormon experiences in Missouri, the Saints had been exiled from the state and had relocated to Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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.
Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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’s narrative is based on firsthand observations and may also have relied on other records he kept. It begins, “In presenting to our readers a history of the persecutions,” indicating that Partridge wrote it for publication purposes. However, there are occasionally significant differences between the manuscript version and “A History, of the Persecution” as published.
The early custodial history of the Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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manuscript is somewhat uncertain. However, the manuscript was presumably among materials in the possession of church historian and recorder Joseph Fielding Smith, who held that office from 1921 to 1970 and who had worked in the Church Historian’s Office many years prior. The manuscript became part of the First Presidency’s papers when Smith became church president in 1970, and, with other records (including Revelation Book 1 and two Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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drafts of JS’s history), was transferred from the First Presidency’s office to the Church History Library in 2005.

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