53993051

Elders’ Journal, August 1838

to God, that I had avoided. But this much I can say that the time past can only teach us to be more wise for the future. I close this communication by saying that from 1830 until now, I have had full confidence in the book of Mormon, the Revelations of God to Joseph Smith Jr., and I still esteem both him and President Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
. as men of the highest integrity, the most exalted principles of virtue and honor, and men who will yet be instruments in the Lord’s hand to accomplish a work in which I shall esteem it the highest honor and the greatest blessing to bear some humble part.
PARLEY P. PRATT

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
.
————
Surrey Co. N. C. May 18, 1838.
Dear Brother in the Lord,
Although I have been seperated from you many months, I have not forgotten you; and be assured that I have often times desired your company, for I have labored alone most of the time since I left Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
.
I have traveled from state to state, proclaiming the word of God; and for the last six months, I have been preaching the gospel in the counties Stokes, Surrey, Patrick and Rockingham, in this state.
The faith of our church, never had been made known to any of the people in this part of the country, until I came here. They had heard many false reports from the mob in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
. The people in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
having sent to their friends in this country, all the exaggerated and false stories, which they were disposed to. And by this means the minds of many have become prejudiced against our people.— And it is almost impossible, to convince this people that the stories are incorrect.
I have one very important request to make, which is, that you would use your utmost endeavors to have some of the elders come to this country without delay. Have this request made known to the Church in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
; tell them, that doors are open in every direction throughout those counties, and it is altogether out of the question for me to fill half of the calls, all of which are very urgent indeed; and the prospects are very good for building up a church. But I have to go to so many places, that it is not possible for me to build up churches, unless I can have help in this great work of the Lord.
I have no doubt when I say there can be a large church built up in this country, but that you know that it is a very hard thing for one alone, to start the work, in a state where the sound had never been heard, save by false reports.
But the people are all very willing to hear; and many are very much believing in the principles that I hold forth. You well know that the state of North Carolina has been past by, by all our elders. I am the only elder I think, that has ever visited this state.
Brother Moses [Martin]; I want that you should send me some of the papers containing the letters of br. Joseph on slavery. Send them to Webb’s Post Office, Stokes Co., N. C. The climate in the country is healthy, and the people hospitable and kind. The elders can come to the Kanawha salt works by water, where they will be within 100 miles of Patrick court house, and when they get there they may enquire for me; and if I am not there, they may enquire for Webbs Post office.
I have baptised 4 since I came to this country, and the prospects are flatterring.
All manner of stories are in circulation here about br. Joseph, he is in Jail for murder! and has runaway from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
to Mo

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
!!!! How do these sayings agree? Give my love to all.
Yours in the covenant of grace.
Jedediah M. GRANT

21 Feb. 1816–1 Dec. 1856. Farmer. Born in Union, Broome Co., New York. Son of Joshua Grant and Athalia Howard. Lived in Springwater, Ontario Co., New York, 1820. Lived in Naples, Ontario Co., 1830. Baptized into LDS church by John F. Boynton, 21 Mar. 1833...

View Full Bio
.
To Moses Martin.
————
Elder [Jedediah] Grant

21 Feb. 1816–1 Dec. 1856. Farmer. Born in Union, Broome Co., New York. Son of Joshua Grant and Athalia Howard. Lived in Springwater, Ontario Co., New York, 1820. Lived in Naples, Ontario Co., 1830. Baptized into LDS church by John F. Boynton, 21 Mar. 1833...

View Full Bio
:
Your letter of the 18th of May, directed to Br. Moses Martin, was a few days since handed to us; and we hasten to give you some information relative to our situation in this part of the land. I have used my influence to send some Elders to your assistance, and I think that one or more will be sent to that region, before long.
Heaven seems to smile upon the saints here, in almost every respect, & surely we ought to be the more faithful to Him who pours out his blessings upon us. Many, very many, have emigrated to this place, this season, and we are informed that many more are on the road.
Another town has lately been laid [p. 51]
to God, that I had avoided. But this much I  can say that the time past can only teach us  to be more wise for the future. I close this  communication by saying that from 1830 un til now, I have had full confidence in the  book of Mormon, the Revelations of God to  Joseph Smith Jr., and I still esteem both him  and President Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
. as men of the highest  integrity, the most exalted principles of vir tue and honor, and men who will yet be in struments in the Lord’s hand to accomplish a  work in which I shall esteem it the highest  honor and the greatest blessing to bear some  humble part.
PARLEY P. PRATT

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
.
————
Surrey Co. N. C. May 18, 1838.
Dear Brother in the Lord,
Although I have  been seperated from you many months,  I have not forgotten you; and be as sured that I have often times desired  your company, for I have labored alone  most of the time since I left Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
.
I have traveled from state to state,  proclaiming the word of God; and for  the last six months, I have been preach ing the gospel in the counties Stokes,  Surrey, Patrick and Rockingham, in  this state.
The faith of our church, never had  been made known to any of the peo ple in this part of the country, until I  came here. They had heard many  false reports from the mob in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
.  The people in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
having  sent to their friends in this country, all  the exaggerated and false stories,  which they were disposed to. And by  this means the minds of many have be come prejudiced against our people.—  And it is almost impossible, to con vince this people that the stories are  incorrect.
I have one very important request  to make, which is, that you would use  your utmost endeavors to have some of  the elders come to this country without  delay. Have this request made known  to the Church in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
; tell them,  that doors are open in every direction  throughout those counties, and it is al together out of the question for me to  fill half of the calls, all of which are  very urgent indeed; and the prospects  are very good for building up a church.  But I have to go to so many places,  that it is not possible for me to build  up churches, unless I can have help  in this great work of the Lord.
I have no doubt when I say there  can be a large church built up in this  country, but that you know that it is a  very hard thing for one alone, to start  the work, in a state where the sound  had never been heard, save by false  reports.
But the people are all very willing  to hear; and many are very much be lieving in the principles that I hold  forth. You well know that the state  of North Carolina has been past by,  by all our elders. I am the only el der I think, that has ever visited this  state.
Brother Moses [Martin]; I want that you  should send me some of the papers  containing the letters of br. Joseph on  slavery. Send them to Webb’s Post  Office, Stokes Co., N. C. The cli mate in the country is healthy, and  the people hospitable and kind. The  elders can come to the Kanawha salt  works by water, where they will be  within 100 miles of Patrick court house,  and when they get there they may en quire for me; and if I am not there,  they may enquire for Webbs Post of fice.
I have baptised 4 since I came to  this country, and the prospects are flat terring.
All manner of stories are in circu lation here about br. Joseph, he is in  Jail for murder! and has runaway from  Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
to Mo

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
!!!! How do these say ings agree? Give my love to all.
Yours in the covenant of grace.
J[edediah] M. GRANT

21 Feb. 1816–1 Dec. 1856. Farmer. Born in Union, Broome Co., New York. Son of Joshua Grant and Athalia Howard. Lived in Springwater, Ontario Co., New York, 1820. Lived in Naples, Ontario Co., 1830. Baptized into LDS church by John F. Boynton, 21 Mar. 1833...

View Full Bio
.
To Moses Martin.
————
Elder [Jedediah] Grant

21 Feb. 1816–1 Dec. 1856. Farmer. Born in Union, Broome Co., New York. Son of Joshua Grant and Athalia Howard. Lived in Springwater, Ontario Co., New York, 1820. Lived in Naples, Ontario Co., 1830. Baptized into LDS church by John F. Boynton, 21 Mar. 1833...

View Full Bio
:
Your letter of the 18th  of May, directed to Br. Moses Martin,  was a few days since handed to us;  and we hasten to give you some infor mation relative to our situation in this  part of the land. I have used my in fluence to send some Elders to your  assistance, and I think that one or  more will be sent to that region, before  long.
Heaven seems to smile upon the  saints here, in almost every respect,  & surely we ought to be the more faith ful to Him who pours out his blessings  upon us. Many, very many, have em igrated to this place, this season, and  we are informed that many more are  on the road.
Another town has lately been laid [p. 51]
PreviousNext
In the final issue of the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, dated September 1837, a prospectus appeared announcing the forthcoming publication of the Elders’ Journal of the Church of Latter Day Saints. The following month, the first issue of the new paper appeared. The short-lived newspaper ran only four issues—two in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
, Ohio, dated October and November 1837; and two in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, Missouri, dated July and August 1838. For the two Far West issues, the title of the paper was changed to Elders’ Journal of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. JS is listed as editor for each of the four issues, with Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
listed as proprietor or publisher. It is unknown how labor was divided on the newspaper or how much immediate responsibility JS had for the content. The paper presumably would have continued with additional issues in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
had it not been for the escalating violence between Mormons and non-Mormons in late 1838, which culminated in the Mormons being driven from the state. After settling at Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

More Info
, Illinois, the Saints began publishing a new paper, the Times and Seasons—though explicitly not as a successor to the Elders’ Journal.

Facts