53993051

Elders’ Journal, August 1838

ly, until it shall be finished, from the corner stone thereof unto the top thereof; untill there shall not any thing remain that is not finished.
Verily I say unto you, let not my servant Joseph, neither my servant Sidney

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, neither my servant Hyrum

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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, get in debt any more for the building an house

Plans for Far West included temple on central block. Latter-day Saints in Caldwell Co. made preparations for construction and commenced excavating for foundation, 3 July 1837. However, while visiting Latter-day Saints in Far West, 6 Nov. 1837, JS gave instructions...

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unto my name.— But let my house

Plans for Far West included temple on central block. Latter-day Saints in Caldwell Co. made preparations for construction and commenced excavating for foundation, 3 July 1837. However, while visiting Latter-day Saints in Far West, 6 Nov. 1837, JS gave instructions...

More Info
be built unto my name according to the pattern which I will show unto them, and if my people build it not according to the pattern which I shall show unto their presidency; I will not accept it at their hands. But if my people do build it according to the pattern which I show unto their presidency, even my servant Joseph and his counsellors; then I will accept it at the hands of my people.
And again: Verily I say unto you, it is my will that the City Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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should be built up speedily by the gathering of my saints; and also that other places should be appointed for stakes in the regions round about as they shall be manifested unto my servant Joseph from time to time. For behold I will be with him, and I will sanctify him before the people; for unto him have I given the keys of this ministry. even so amen.
————
TO THE SAINTS ABROAD.
In order that the object for which the saints are gathered together in the last days, as spoken of by all the holy prophets since the world began, may be obtained, it is essentially necessary, that they should all be gathered into the Cities appointed for that purpose; as it will be much better for them all, in order that they may be in a situation to have the necessary instruction, to prepare them for the duties of their callings respectively.
The advantages of so doing are numerous, while the disadvantages are few, if there are any. As intelligence is the great object of our holy religion, it is of all things important, that we should place ourselves in the best situation possible to obtain it. And we wish it to be deeply impressed on the minds of all, that to obtain all the knowledge which the circumstances of man will admit of, is one of the principle objects the saints have in gathering together. Intelligence is the result of education, and education can only be obtained by living in compact society; so compact, that schools of all kinds can be supported, and that while we are supporting schools, we, without any exception, can be benefited thereby.
It matters not how advanced many who embrace the gospel, be in life, the true object of their calling, is to increase their intelligence; to give them knowledge and understanding in all things which pertain to their happiness and peace, both here and hereafter.— And it is therefore required, that they place themselves in a situation accordingly.
Vain are the hopes of those who embrace the gospel, and then suppose, like the ignorant sectarians of the day, they have nothing more to do, but hold on to what they have gotten. Oh indeed! they think, or at least some of them do, that it is very well to have their priest educated, as well as they can; but for the people, they can serve God as well in ignorance as any other way: they can say their prayers, whether there is sense in them or not; and sing Psalms, it matters not whether they are suited to their condition or not; and thus in the most profound ignorance, with a learned blockhead, at their head, blunder on, until they blunder into heaven. But this stupid ignorance cannot exist among the saints.— It will do well enough, for creatures that know not God, and have not obeyed the gospel. But for saints it will not do. The great God when he began to work for his name’s glory, never thought of doing so, by raising up a society of ignoramuses, but of men and women of intelligence; of first intelligence. Of intelligence as high as human nature was susceptable; and by this means glorify himself.
One of the principal objects then, of our coming together, is to obtain the advantages of education; and in order to do this, compact society is absolutely necessary: it cannot be obtained without it, at most only by the few, to the exclusion of the many; which is a principle, at war with the principles of the church of Christ; for the principle of the church is, that what one has, all have; and equal privileges must be granted to all, or else it is not the church of Christ. And if those, on whom the important duty of regulating this matter devolves, should neglect to do their duty in this matter, they will be found transgressors.
We wish the saints then to be apprised of this, that in order to obtain the ends of their calling, they will find it, unavoidably, necessary that they [p. 53]
ly, until it shall be finished, from the corner  stone thereof unto the top thereof; untill  there shall not any thing remain that is not  finished.
Verily I say unto you, let not my servant  Joseph, neither my servant Sidney

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
, neither  my servant Hyrum

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
, get in debt any more  for the building an house

Plans for Far West included temple on central block. Latter-day Saints in Caldwell Co. made preparations for construction and commenced excavating for foundation, 3 July 1837. However, while visiting Latter-day Saints in Far West, 6 Nov. 1837, JS gave instructions...

More Info
unto my name.—  But let my house

Plans for Far West included temple on central block. Latter-day Saints in Caldwell Co. made preparations for construction and commenced excavating for foundation, 3 July 1837. However, while visiting Latter-day Saints in Far West, 6 Nov. 1837, JS gave instructions...

More Info
be built unto my name ac cording to the pattern which I will show un to them, and if my people build it not accor ding to the pattern which I shall show unto  their presidency; I will not accept it at their  hands. But if my people do build it accord ing to the pattern which I show unto their  presidency, even my servant Joseph and his  counsellors; then I will accept it at the hands  of my people.
And again: Verily I say unto you, it is my  will that the City Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
should be built  up speedily by the gathering of my saints;  and also that other places should be appoint ed for stakes in the regions round about as  they shall be manifested unto my servant Jo seph from time to time. For behold I will be  with him, and I will sanctify him before the  people; for unto him have I given the keys  of this ministry. even so amen.
————
TO THE SAINTS ABROAD.
In order that the object for which  the saints are gathered together in the  last days, as spoken of by all the holy  prophets since the world began, may  be obtained, it is essentially necessary,  that they should all be gathered in to the Cities appointed for that pur pose; as it will be much better for them  all, in order that they may be in a sit uation to have the necessary instruc tion, to prepare them for the duties of  their callings respectively.
The advantages of so doing are nu merous, while the disadvantages are  few, if there are any. As intelligence  is the great object of our holy religion,  it is of all things important, that we  should place ourselves in the best situ ation possible to obtain it. And we  wish it to be deeply impressed on the  minds of all, that to obtain all the  knowledge which the circumstances of  man will admit of, is one of the princi ple objects the saints have in gather ing together. Intelligence is the re sult of education, and education can  only be obtained by living in compact  society; so compact, that schools of all  kinds can be supported, and that while  we are supporting schools, we, without  any exception, can be benefited there by.
It matters not how advanced many  who embrace the gospel, be in life, the  true object of their calling, is to in crease their intelligence; to give them  knowledge and understanding in all  things which pertain to their happiness  and peace, both here and hereafter.—  And it is therefore required, that they  place themselves in a situation accord ingly.
Vain are the hopes of those who em brace the gospel, and then suppose,  like the ignorant sectarians of the day,  they have nothing more to do, but hold  on to what they have gotten. Oh in deed! they think, or at least some of  them do, that it is very well to have  their priest educated, as well as they  can; but for the people, they can serve  God as well in ignorance as any other  way: they can say their prayers,  whether there is sense in them or not;  and sing Psalms, it matters not wheth er they are suited to their condition or  not; and thus in the most profound ig norance, with a learned blockhead, at  their head, blunder on, until they blun der into heaven. But this stupid ignor ance cannot exist among the saints.—  It will do well enough, for creatures  that know not God, and have not obey ed the gospel. But for saints it will  not do. The great God when he be gan to work for his name’s glory, nev er thought of doing so, by raising up a  society of ignoramuses, but of men and  women of intelligence; of first intelli gence. Of intelligence as high as hu man nature was susceptable; and by  this means glorify himself.
One of the principal objects then, of  our coming together, is to obtain the  advantages of education; and in order  to do this, compact society is absolute ly necessary: it cannot be obtained  without it, at most only by the few, to  the exclusion of the many; which is a  principle, at war with the principles of  the church of Christ; for the princi ple of the church is, that what one has,  all have; and equal privileges must be  granted to all, or else it is not the  church of Christ. And if those, on  whom the important duty of regulating  this matter devolves, should neglect to  do their duty in this matter, they will  be found transgressors.
We wish the saints then to be ap prised of this, that in order to obtain  [t]he ends of their calling, they will find  [i]t, unavoidably, necessary that they [p. 53]
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In the final issue of the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, dated September 1837, a prospectus appeared announcing the forthcoming publication of the Elders’ Journal of the Church of Latter Day Saints. The following month, the first issue of the new paper appeared. The short-lived newspaper ran only four issues—two in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, dated October and November 1837; and two in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri, dated July and August 1838. For the two Far West issues, the title of the paper was changed to Elders’ Journal of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. JS is listed as editor for each of the four issues, with Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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listed as proprietor or publisher. It is unknown how labor was divided on the newspaper or how much immediate responsibility JS had for the content. The paper presumably would have continued with additional issues in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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had it not been for the escalating violence between Mormons and non-Mormons in late 1838, which culminated in the Mormons being driven from the state. After settling at Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

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, Illinois, the Saints began publishing a new paper, the Times and Seasons—though explicitly not as a successor to the Elders’ Journal.

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