53993051

Elders’ Journal, August 1838

shall, forever defy the Son of God, and so completely destroy the Zion of the last days, that he never will come down and reign, in mount Zion, and in Jerusalem, and before his ancients gloriously.
Poor simpletons! they do not know, that he who sits in the heavens is laughing at them, that he has them in derision, and that after he has let them foam out their own shame, and completely work out their own damnation, that he will speak to them in his wrath, and vex them in his displeasure; and that when his wrath is but a little kindled, they will perish.
If we did not know, that the people of this generation, love lies more than the truth, or at least a great many of them, it would be a matter of some astonishment to us, to see with what eagerness, they give audience to every hypocrite and iniquitous wretch, we detect in his wickedness, and bring to an account: it matters not how scandalous is his conduct, the priests and all their coajutors, rally around them, the very instant they are excluded from the church, and listen with most intense interest, to their lies; and soon, the papers are filled with their lies and abomination. But such is the piteous situation of the priests, of all denominations, for there are no exceptions to be made; for to say the best of them, they have pleasure in lies, but in the truth they have no pleasure, neither have they any part.
Within the last six months, they have been making one of their greatest efforts. The church in accordance with her laws, excluded from her fellowship, a set of creatures, whose behavior would have disgraced a heathen temple, and as might have been expected, they had recourse to the foulest lying, and basest slander, in order to hide their iniquity. This served as a favorable opportunity, to the persecuting priests and their adherents. They gathered round them in swarms, like the flies round Esop’s fox, and opened both their eyes and ears, to enjoy a good feast of lies, which pleased them more abundantly, than any other sound could, except the voice of Beelzebub the prince of the whole brood; his voice, would doubtless have been more delightful to them, than an angel of light, to the ear of a prophet of the living God.
All these pious soul’s papers were put into requisition, and this gang of liars, thieves, and drunkards, were called upon, immediately, to write their lies on paper, and let them print them; so, that all the world might have as great a feast of lies, as they had.— Accordingly to work they all went with one accord. And after this mighty mountain of bustle and human folly, has filled its full time of gestation.— Behold! and lo! it brought forth a mouse!! From the bowels of Mr Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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; and the priest’s papers, have flown abroad to tell the world of it.
No animal we presume, has been produced in the last century, which caused more agony, pain, and groaning, than this wonder of modern times; for during the time of gestation, and a long time before the birth thereof, he kept up such an unusual groaning and grunting, that all the devils whelps in Geauga

Located in northeastern Ohio, south of Lake Erie. Rivers in area include Grand, Chagrin, and Cuyahoga. Settled mostly by New Englanders, beginning 1798. Formed from Trumbull Co., 1 Mar. 1806. Chardon established as county seat, 1808. Population in 1830 about...

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and in Cuyahoga counties in Ohio, were running together, to hear what was about to come forth, from the womb of granny Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

View Full Bio
. He had made such an awful fuss, about what was conceived in him, that night after night, and day after day, he poured out his agony before all living, as they saw proper to assemble. For a rational being, to have looked at him, and heard him groan and grunt, and see him sweat and struggle, would have supposed, that his womb was as much swollen, as was Rebecca’s when the angel told her, that there were two nations there.
In all this grunting business, he was aided by Leonard Rich

1800–1868. Farmer. Born in New York. Married first Keziah. Lived at Warsaw, Genesee Co., New York, 1830. Participated in Camp of Israel expedition to Missouri, 1834. Served as a president of First Quorum of the Seventy, 1835–1837. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga...

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who, however was generally so drunk, that he had to support himself, by something, to keep him from falling down; but then it was all for conscience sake. Also a pair of young blacklegs, one of them a Massachusetts

One of original thirteen colonies that formed U.S. Capital city, Boston. Colonized by English religious dissenters, 1620s. Population in 1830 about 610,000. Population in 1840 about 738,000. Joseph Smith Sr. born in Massachusetts. Samuel Smith and Orson Hyde...

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shoemaker by the name of John F. Boynton

20 Sept. 1811–20 Oct. 1890. Merchant, lecturer, scientist, inventor. Born at East Bradford (later Groveland), Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Eliphalet Boynton and Susanna Nichols. Baptized into LDS church by JS, Sept. 1832, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio...

View Full Bio
, a man notorious for nothing, but ignorance; ill breeding and impudence. And the other by the name of Luke Johnson

3 Nov. 1807–8 Dec. 1861. Farmer, teacher, doctor. Born at Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of John Johnson and Alice (Elsa) Jacobs. Lived at Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, when baptized into LDS church by JS, 10 May 1831. Ordained a priest by Christian Whitmer...

View Full Bio
, whose notoriety consisted, if information be correct, in stealing a barrel of flour from his father

14 Apr. 1779–30 July 1843. Farmer, innkeeper. Born at Chesterfield, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of Israel Johnson and Abigail Higgins. Married Alice (Elsa) Jacobs, 22 June 1800. Moved to Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont, ca. 1803. Settled at Hiram, Portage...

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, and other acts of a similar kind.
Thus aided, mamma Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

View Full Bio
made [p. 56]
shall, forever defy the Son of God, and  so completely destroy the Zion of the  last days, that he never will come down  and reign, in mount Zion, and in Jeru salem, and before his ancients glori ously.
Poor simpletons! they do not know,  that he who sits in the heavens is  laughing at them, that he has them in  derision, and that after he has let them  foam out their own shame, and com pletely work out their own damnation,  that he will speak to them in his wrath,  and vex them in his displeasure; and  that when his wrath is but a little kind led, they will perish.
If we did not know, that the people  of this generation, love lies more than  the truth, or at least a great many of  them, it would be a matter of some as tonishment to us, to see with what ea gerness, they give audience to every  hypocrite and iniquitous wretch, we  detect in his wickedness, and bring to  an account: it matters not how scanda lous is his conduct, the priests and all  their coajutors, rally around them, the  very instant they are excluded from  the church, and listen with most intense  interest, to their lies; and soon, the  papers are filled with their lies and  abomination. But such is the piteous  situation of the priests, of all denomi nations, for there are no exceptions to  be made; for to say the best of them,  they have pleasure in lies, but in the  truth they have no pleasure, neither  have they any part.
Within the last six months, they  have been making one of their greatest  efforts. The church in accordance  with her laws, excluded from her fel lowship, a set of creatures, whose be havior would have disgraced a heathen  temple, and as might have been expect ed, they had recourse to the foulest  lying, and basest slander, in order to  hide their iniquity. This served as a  favorable opportunity, to the persecut ing priests and their adherents. They  gathered round them in swarms, like  the flies round Esop’s fox, and opened  both their eyes and ears, to enjoy a  good feast of lies, which pleased them  more abundantly, than any other sound  could, except the voice of Beelzebub the  prince of the whole brood; his voice,  would doubtless have been more de lightful to them, than an angel of light,  to the ear of a prophet of the living  God.
All these pious soul’s papers were  put into requisition, and this gang of  liars, thieves, and drunkards, were  called upon, immediately, to wr[i]te  their lies on paper, and let them print  them; so, that all the world might have  as great a feast of lies, as they had.—  Accordingly to work they all went with  one accord. And after this mighty  mountain of bustle and human folly,  has filled its full time of gestation.—  Behold! and lo! it brought forth a  mouse!! From the bowels of Mr  Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

View Full Bio
; and the priest’s pa pers, have flown abroad to tell the  world of it.
No animal we presume, has been  produced in the last century, which  caused more agony, pain, and groan ing, than this wonder of modern times;  for during the time of gestation, and a  long time before the birth thereof, he  kept up such an unusual groaning and  grunting, that all the devils whelps in  Geauga

Located in northeastern Ohio, south of Lake Erie. Rivers in area include Grand, Chagrin, and Cuyahoga. Settled mostly by New Englanders, beginning 1798. Formed from Trumbull Co., 1 Mar. 1806. Chardon established as county seat, 1808. Population in 1830 about...

More Info
and in Cuyahoga counties in  Ohio, were running together, to hear  what was about to come forth, from  the womb of granny Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

View Full Bio
. He had  made such an awful fuss, about what  was conceived in him, that night after  night, and day after day, he poured out  his agony before all living, as they  saw proper to assemble. For a ration al being, to have looked at him, and  heard him groan and grunt, and see  him sweat and struggle, would have  supposed, that his womb was as much  swollen, as was Rebecca’s when the  angel told her, that there were two na tions there.
In all this grunting business, he was  aided by Leonard Rich

1800–1868. Farmer. Born in New York. Married first Keziah. Lived at Warsaw, Genesee Co., New York, 1830. Participated in Camp of Israel expedition to Missouri, 1834. Served as a president of First Quorum of the Seventy, 1835–1837. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga...

View Full Bio
who, however  was generally so drunk, that he had  to support himself, by something, to  keep him from falling down; but then  it was all for conscience sake. Also a  pair of young blacklegs, one of them a  Massachusetts

One of original thirteen colonies that formed U.S. Capital city, Boston. Colonized by English religious dissenters, 1620s. Population in 1830 about 610,000. Population in 1840 about 738,000. Joseph Smith Sr. born in Massachusetts. Samuel Smith and Orson Hyde...

More Info
shoemaker by the name  of John F. Boynton

20 Sept. 1811–20 Oct. 1890. Merchant, lecturer, scientist, inventor. Born at East Bradford (later Groveland), Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Eliphalet Boynton and Susanna Nichols. Baptized into LDS church by JS, Sept. 1832, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio...

View Full Bio
, a man notorious  for nothing, but ignorance; ill breeding  and impudence. And the other by the  name of Luke Johnson

3 Nov. 1807–8 Dec. 1861. Farmer, teacher, doctor. Born at Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of John Johnson and Alice (Elsa) Jacobs. Lived at Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, when baptized into LDS church by JS, 10 May 1831. Ordained a priest by Christian Whitmer...

View Full Bio
, whose notorie ty consisted, if information be correct,  in stealing a barrel of flour from his  father

14 Apr. 1779–30 July 1843. Farmer, innkeeper. Born at Chesterfield, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of Israel Johnson and Abigail Higgins. Married Alice (Elsa) Jacobs, 22 June 1800. Moved to Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont, ca. 1803. Settled at Hiram, Portage...

View Full Bio
, and other acts of a similar  kind.
Thus aided, mamma Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

View Full Bio
made [p. 56]
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In the final issue of the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, dated September 1837, a prospectus appeared announcing the forthcoming publication of the Elders’ Journal of the Church of Latter Day Saints. The following month, the first issue of the new paper appeared. The short-lived newspaper ran only four issues—two in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, dated October and November 1837; and two in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri, dated July and August 1838. For the two Far West issues, the title of the paper was changed to Elders’ Journal of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. JS is listed as editor for each of the four issues, with Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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listed as proprietor or publisher. It is unknown how labor was divided on the newspaper or how much immediate responsibility JS had for the content. The paper presumably would have continued with additional issues in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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had it not been for the escalating violence between Mormons and non-Mormons in late 1838, which culminated in the Mormons being driven from the state. After settling at Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

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, Illinois, the Saints began publishing a new paper, the Times and Seasons—though explicitly not as a successor to the Elders’ Journal.

Facts