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Elders’ Journal, July 1838

ELDERS’ JOURNAL
OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS.
Vol 1. No. 3.]- FAR WEST

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, MISSOURI, JULY, 1838. -[Whole No. 3.
 
Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, May, 1838.
Notwithstanding all efforts of the enemies to the truth, both from without and within, to the contrary, we are enabled to present this Journal, to the patrons, with the prospect of being able to continue it in time to come, without interruption.
Great have been the exertions of the opposers to righteousness, to prevent us from sending abroad the doctrines of the church to the world: every effort has been used by the combined influence of all classes of enemies, and of all sects and parties of religion; and of those who are opposed to it, in all its forms to prevent it.
It is indeed somewhat unexpected to us, to be able to commence printing the Journal again so soon; but the general interest felt in it by the Saints in general, soon, in a degree, repaired the loss which was suffered in the burning of the press in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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; and another establishment, by the exertions of the Saints in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, has been obtained, sufficiently large, to print the Journal; and soon will be greatly enlarged, so as to do all the printing necessary, for the whole church.
We have no doubt, but liberal minded men will continue to aid with their means, until the establishment will be sufficiently supplied with means to make the largest of the kind, any where in the region of country where it is located.
In this place, the church is as pleasently situated as could be expected, taking into consideration their circumstances, as the settlement here is but about eighteen months old, and the first settlers had been driven from their homes, and all their property destroyed, and had to come here without any thing.— But to their honor it may be said, that few people on earth have endured the same degree of persecution, with the same patience.
Nothing discouraged by the great afflictions and tribulations which they have had to endure for Christ’s sake. They united with all their powers, to turn a solitary place into a fruitful field—we do not say a wilderness, for there is not a sufficiency of timber to make it a wilderness—and have exceeded the highest expectations of the most enthusiastic.
Large bodies of land have been, and are now putting under cultivation.
We might venture an assertion on this point, and that, without the fear of contradiction by those who are acquainted with the settlements in this vicinity, and that is, no part of the world can produce a superior to Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, if an equal. Eighteen months since without scarcely an inhabitant: at this time the City of “Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
,” the county seat, has one hundred and fifty houses, and almost the whole county

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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is taken up, or all that part of it, which can be conveniently settled for want of timber: and large bodies of it are now under cultivation.
An enconium too high, cannot be placed upon the heads of the enterprising and industrious habits of the people of this county

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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. They are fast making for themselves, and their posterity after them, as beautiful, interesting, and as profitable homes, as can be in any country.
In a few years, and it will be said with propriety, “that the solitary place has become glad for them;” and we can say, that the people will be as glad for it.
This town “Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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” is situated in Caldwell county

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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Missouri, in the midst of a prairie of very rich soil. It is an elevated piece of land, and has a commanding view of the surrounding country for many miles, in every direction. On the north, about one mile passes Shoal Creek

Stream that flows eastward for about forty-five miles from east central Clinton Co. through Caldwell Co. to confluence with Grand River in central Livingston Co. Thousands of Saints moved from Clay Co. to sites along Shoal Creek in Caldwell Co., beginning...

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, a heavy stream which has many water privileges on it. On the south, a little more than half a mile, runs Goose Creek, a tributary of Shoal

Stream that flows eastward for about forty-five miles from east central Clinton Co. through Caldwell Co. to confluence with Grand River in central Livingston Co. Thousands of Saints moved from Clay Co. to sites along Shoal Creek in Caldwell Co., beginning...

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. It also is large enough to admit of water-works.
To all appearance the country is healthy, and the farming interest is equal to that in any part of the world; and the means of living are very easily obtained, not even luxuries excepted.
From this to the territorial line on the north, is from eighty to one hundred miles, and to the line on the west, twenty five or upwards, or what was the territorial line, before the purchase [p. [33]]
ELDERS’ JOURNAL
OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS.
Vol 1. No. 3.]- FAR WEST

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, MISSOURI, JULY, 1838. -[Whole No. 3.
 
Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, May, 1838.
Notwithstanding all efforts of the  enemies to the truth, both from without  and within, to the contrary, we are en abled to present this Journal, to the  patrons, with the prospect of being able  to continue it in time to come, without  interruption.
Great have been the exertions of the  opposers to righteousness, to prevent  us from sending abroad the doctrines of  the church to the world: every effort  has been used by the combined influ ence of all classes of enemies, and of  all sects and parties of religion; and of  those who are opposed to it, in all its  forms to prevent it.
It is indeed somewhat unexpected to  us, to be able to commence printing the  Journal again so soon; but the general  interest felt in it by the Saints in gen eral, soon, in a degree, repaired the  loss which was suffered in the burning  of the press in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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; and another  establishment, by the exertions of the  Saints in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, has been obtained,  sufficiently large, to print the Journal;  and soon will be greatly enlarged, so as  to do all the printing necessary, for the  whole church.
We have no doubt, but liberal mind ed men will continue to aid with their  means, until the establishment will be  sufficiently supplied with means to  make the largest of the kind, any where  in the region of country where it is lo cated.
In this place, the church is as pleas ently situated as could be expected, tak ing into consideration their circumstan ces, as the settlement here is but about  eighteen months old, and the first set tlers had been driven from their homes,  and all their property destroyed, and  had to come here without any thing.—  But to their honor it may be said, that  few people on earth have endured the  same degree of persecution, with the  same patience.
Nothing discouraged by the great af flictions and tribulations which they  have had to endure for Christ’s sake.  They united with all their powers, to  turn a solitary place into a fruitful  field—we do not say a wilderness, for  there is not a sufficiency of timber to  make it a wilderness—and have ex ceeded the highest expectations of the  most enthusiastic.
Large bodies of land have been, and  are now putting under cultivation.
We might venture an assertion on  this point, and that, without the fear of  contradiction by those who are acquaint ed with the settlements in this vicinity,  and that is, no part of the world can  produce a superior to Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
,  if an equal. Eighteen months since  without scarcely an inhabitant: at this  time the City of “Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
,” the  county seat, has one hundred and fifty  houses, and almost the whole county

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
is  taken up, or all that part of it, which  can be conveniently settled for want of  timber: and large bodies of it are now  under cultivation.
An enconium too high, cannot be  placed upon the heads of the enterpris ing and industrious habits of the people  of this county

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
. They are fast making  for themselves, and their posterity af ter them, as beautiful, interesting, and  as profitable homes, as can be in any  country.
In a few years, and it will be  said with propriety, “that the solitary  place has become glad for them;” and  we can say, that the people will be as  glad for it.
This town “Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
” is situated in  Caldwell county

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
Missouri, in the midst  of a prairie of very rich soil. It is an  elevated piece of land, and has a com manding view of the surrounding coun try for many miles, in every direction.  On the north, about one mile passes  Shoal Creek

Stream that flows eastward for about forty-five miles from east central Clinton Co. through Caldwell Co. to confluence with Grand River in central Livingston Co. Thousands of Saints moved from Clay Co. to sites along Shoal Creek in Caldwell Co., beginning...

More Info
, a heavy stream which  has many water privileges on it. On  the south, a little more than half a  mile, runs Goose Creek, a tributary of  Shoal

Stream that flows eastward for about forty-five miles from east central Clinton Co. through Caldwell Co. to confluence with Grand River in central Livingston Co. Thousands of Saints moved from Clay Co. to sites along Shoal Creek in Caldwell Co., beginning...

More Info
. It also is large enough to ad mit of water-works.
To all appearance the country is  healthy, and the farming interest is  equal to that in any part of the world;  and the means of living are very easily  obtained, not even luxuries excepted.
From this to the territorial line on  the north, is from eighty to one hund red miles, and to the line on the west,  twenty five or upwards, or what was  the territorial line, before the purchase [p. [33]]
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In the final issue of the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, dated September 1837, a prospectus appeared announcing the forthcoming publication of the Elders’ Journal of the Church of Latter Day Saints. The following month, the first issue of the new paper appeared. The short-lived newspaper ran only four issues—two in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, dated October and November 1837; and two in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri, dated July and August 1838. For the two Far West issues, the title of the paper was changed to Elders’ Journal of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. JS is listed as editor for each of the four issues, with Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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listed as proprietor or publisher. It is unknown how labor was divided on the newspaper or how much immediate responsibility JS had for the content. The paper presumably would have continued with additional issues in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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had it not been for the escalating violence between Mormons and non-Mormons in late 1838, which culminated in the Mormons being driven from the state. After settling at Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

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, Illinois, the Saints began publishing a new paper, the Times and Seasons—though explicitly not as a successor to the Elders’ Journal.

Facts