53993050

Elders’ Journal, July 1838

drawn their subscription, and these two men, claiming this two thousand dollars as their subscription, choose to withdraw it, and put it into their own pockets. A small part of which, has been already paid to Wm. W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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.
The Council, not feeling willing that the church should be defrauded out of two thousand dollars of her public funds, and also knowing that the church in general, as well as themselves, had become dissatisfied with their conduct, as christians, in many things, appointed a committee to labor with them; after which, they called the whole church in Zion together, who almost unanimously voted them out of their presidential office.
Not long after this, the council saw cause to appoint a second committee, to wait on these men, who still persisted in their opposition to the interests of the church. After which, charges were preferred against them before the Council, which were substantiated, and they were excommunicated.
Also, the church has had much sorrow during the past winter, on account of the unfaithfulness of Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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, David Whitmer

7 Jan. 1805–25 Jan. 1888. Farmer, livery keeper. Born near Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Raised Presbyterian. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, shortly after birth. Attended German Reformed Church. Arranged...

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, and Lyman E. Johnson

24 Oct. 1811–20 Dec. 1859. Merchant, lawyer, hotelier. Born at Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of John Johnson and Alice (Elsa) Jacobs. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, Mar. 1818. Baptized into LDS church by Sidney Rigdon, Feb. 1831. Ordained an elder...

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, and in consequence of this, and their opposition to our beloved brother Joseph Smith jr. and the best interest of the church of Jesus Christ, and for persisting in the same, a number of charges have been substantiated against them, before the Council and Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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of the church, and they have also been excluded from fellowship. “How has the gold become dim, the most fine gold changed!!!”
But I must drop this subtect for want of room. Suffice it to say, brethren Joseph Smith Jr. and Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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are now with us, the church now flourishes, and the Saints rejoice, and the internal enemies of the church. are down. You will see by the above prospectus, that your anxious desires for the Journal are about to be granted.
May the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, bless you, and keep you unto his coming and Kingdom. Amen.
My love to all the Saints in those regions.
Yours in the love of God.
THOMAS B. MARSH

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
.
Wilford Woodruff

1 Mar. 1807–2 Sept. 1898. Farmer, miller. Born at Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Aphek Woodruff and Beulah Thompson. Moved to Richland, Oswego Co., New York, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Zera Pulsipher, 31 Dec. 1833, near Richland. Ordained...

View Full Bio
.
——
P. S. Since Br. Joseph came to this place, we have been favored with a lengthy revelation, in which many important items are shown forth. First, that the church shall hereafter be called “the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints” Second, it says. “Let the City Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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be a holy and consecrated land unto me, and it shall be called most holy, for the ground upon which thou standests is holy:— Therefore, I command you to build an house

Plans for Far West included temple on central block. Latter-day Saints in Caldwell Co. made preparations for construction and commenced excavating for foundation, 3 July 1837. However, while visiting Latter-day Saints in Far West, 6 Nov. 1837, JS gave instructions...

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unto me, for the gathering together of my Saints, that they may worship me.” It also teaches, that the foundation or corner stone must be laid on tho [the] 4th day of July next, and that a commencement must be made in this following season, and in one year from the 26th of April last, the foundation must be again commenced, and from that time, to continue the work until it is finished. Thus we see that the Lord is more wise than men, for Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

View Full Bio
and Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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thought to commence it long before this, but it was not the Lord’s time, therefore, he overthrew it, and has appointed his own time. The plan is yet to be shown to the first presidency; and all the Saints, in all the world, are commanded to assist in building the house

Plans for Far West included temple on central block. Latter-day Saints in Caldwell Co. made preparations for construction and commenced excavating for foundation, 3 July 1837. However, while visiting Latter-day Saints in Far West, 6 Nov. 1837, JS gave instructions...

More Info
.
THOMAS B. MARSH

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
.
————
Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, May, 1838.
To the Elders abroad:
1st. The respect and duty which I owe to my Heavenly Father, to the church of Latter Day Saints, and to the Elders who are abroad in the earth, induces me, to drop a few encouraging hints, unto you my beloved fellow laborers in the kingdom which God has set up in these last days.
2nd. Brethren I am aware of your thirst, for the gathering of that long dispersed people, who are of the house of Israel. I am aware of your toils, and fatigues, in traveling from city to city; from state to state; from kingdom to kingdom; and from Island to Island, to declare the gospel in its purity, unto the inhabitants of this generation.— Declaring unto them in plain terms, that God has again spoken from the heavens by the voice of revelation, that the hour of his Judgment is nigh at hand, and that God hath decreed that wars, famine, and pestilence, will soon cover the land; that Babylon must fall, and great must be the fall thereof. Declaring plainly unto the honest in [p. 38]
drawn their subscription, and these two  men, claiming this two thousand dol lars as their subscription, choose to  withdraw it, and put it into their own  pockets. A small part of which, has  been already paid to Wm. W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

View Full Bio
.
The Council, not feeling willing that  the church should be defrauded out of  two thousand dollars of her public funds,  and also knowing that the church  in general, as well as themselves, had  become dissatisfied with their conduct,  as christians, in many things, appoint ed a committee to labor with them; af ter which, they called the whole church  in Zion together, who almost unanim ously voted them out of their presiden tial office.
Not long after this, the council saw  cause to appoint a second committee,  to wait on these men, who still persisted  in their opposition to the interests of  the church. After which, charges  were preferred against them before the  Council, which were substantiated, and  they were excommunicated.
Also, the church has had much sor row during the past winter, on account  of the unfaithfulness of Oliver Cow dery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
, David Whitmer

7 Jan. 1805–25 Jan. 1888. Farmer, livery keeper. Born near Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Raised Presbyterian. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, shortly after birth. Attended German Reformed Church. Arranged...

View Full Bio
, and Lyman E.  Johnson

24 Oct. 1811–20 Dec. 1859. Merchant, lawyer, hotelier. Born at Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of John Johnson and Alice (Elsa) Jacobs. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, Mar. 1818. Baptized into LDS church by Sidney Rigdon, Feb. 1831. Ordained an elder...

View Full Bio
, and in consequence of this,  and their opposition to our beloved  brother Joseph Smith jr. and the best  interest of the church of Jesus Christ,  and for persisting in the same, a num ber of charges have been substantiated  against them, before the Council and  Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
of the church, and they have  also been excluded from fellowship.  “How has the gold become dim, the  most fine gold changed!!!”
But I must drop this subtect for want  of room. Suffice it to say, brethren  Joseph Smith Jr. and Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
 are now with us, the church now flour ishes, and the Saints rejoice, and the  internal enemies of the church. are  down. You will see by the above pros pectus, that your anxious desires for  the Journal are about to be granted.
May the God of Abraham, Isaac,  and Jacob, bless you, and keep you un to his coming and Kingdom. Amen.
My love to all the Saints in those re gions.
Yours in the love of God.
THOMAS B. MARSH

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
.
Wilford Woodruff

1 Mar. 1807–2 Sept. 1898. Farmer, miller. Born at Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Aphek Woodruff and Beulah Thompson. Moved to Richland, Oswego Co., New York, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Zera Pulsipher, 31 Dec. 1833, near Richland. Ordained...

View Full Bio
.
——
P. S. Since Br. Joseph came to this  place, we have been favored with a  lengthy revelation, in which many im portant items are shown forth. First,  that the church shall hereafter be call ed “the Church of Jesus Christ, of  Latter Day Saints” Second, it says.  “Let the City Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
be a holy and  consecrated land unto me, and it shall  be called most holy, for the ground up on which thou standests is holy:—  Therefore, I command you to build an  house

Plans for Far West included temple on central block. Latter-day Saints in Caldwell Co. made preparations for construction and commenced excavating for foundation, 3 July 1837. However, while visiting Latter-day Saints in Far West, 6 Nov. 1837, JS gave instructions...

More Info
unto me, for the gathering to gether of my Saints, that they may  worship me.” It also teaches, that the  foundation or corner stone must be laid  on tho [the] 4th day of July next, and that a  commencement must be made in this  following season, and in one year from  the 26th of April last, the foundation  must be again commenced, and from  that time, to continue the work until it  is finished. Thus we see that the Lord  is more wise than men, for Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

View Full Bio
and  Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

View Full Bio
thought to commence it long  before this, but it was not the Lord’s  time, therefore, he overthrew it, and  has appointed his own time. The plan  is yet to be shown to the first presiden cy; and all the Saints, in all the world,  are commanded to assist in building the  house

Plans for Far West included temple on central block. Latter-day Saints in Caldwell Co. made preparations for construction and commenced excavating for foundation, 3 July 1837. However, while visiting Latter-day Saints in Far West, 6 Nov. 1837, JS gave instructions...

More Info
.
THOMAS B. MARSH

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
.
————
Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, May, 1838.
To the Elders abroad:
1st. The respect  and duty which I owe to my Heavenly  Father, to the church of Latter Day  Saints, and to the Elders who are a broad in the earth, induces me, to drop  a few encouraging hints, unto you my  beloved fellow laborers in the kingdom  which God has set up in these last  days.
2nd. Brethren I am aware of your  thirst, for the gathering of that long  dispersed people, who are of the house  of Israel. I am aware of your toils,  and fatigues, in traveling from city to  city; from state to state; from kingdom  to king[d]om; and from Island to Island,  to declare the gospel in its purity, unto  the inhabitants of this generation.—  Declaring unto them in plain terms,  that God has again spoken from the  heavens by the voice of revelation, that  the hour of his Judgment is nigh at  hand, and that God hath decreed that  wars, famine, and pestilence, will soon  cover the land; that Babylon must fall,  and great must be the fall thereof.  Declaring plainly unto the honest in [p. 38]
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In the final issue of the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, dated September 1837, a prospectus appeared announcing the forthcoming publication of the Elders’ Journal of the Church of Latter Day Saints. The following month, the first issue of the new paper appeared. The short-lived newspaper ran only four issues—two in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, dated October and November 1837; and two in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, Missouri, dated July and August 1838. For the two Far West issues, the title of the paper was changed to Elders’ Journal of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. JS is listed as editor for each of the four issues, with Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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listed as proprietor or publisher. It is unknown how labor was divided on the newspaper or how much immediate responsibility JS had for the content. The paper presumably would have continued with additional issues in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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had it not been for the escalating violence between Mormons and non-Mormons in late 1838, which culminated in the Mormons being driven from the state. After settling at Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

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, Illinois, the Saints began publishing a new paper, the Times and Seasons—though explicitly not as a successor to the Elders’ Journal.

Facts