53993050

Elders’ Journal, July 1838

heart, that they must separate themselves from Babylon, lest ye be partakers of her sins, and likewise of her plagues.
3rd. O ye Elders of Israel! lift up your heads and rejoice, for the day of your redemption draweth nigh, comfort yourselves, by pondering in your hearts the grand events which will transpire at the morn of the millenium; when there shall be no mobs, to rise up against you; no weapon formed against you by lawless marauders; and no tongue to scandalize your character, by vain and groundless reports; knowing that this blessing will be placed upon your heads, when you return from your ministry; and when the Judge of the whole earth shall say, well done thou good and faithful servant, thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things; enter thou into the joys of thy Lord.
4th. Lift up your heads then, ye Elders of Israel, say to the North, give up, to the South, keep not back. Say to the Isles of the sea, be glad, and to the Kingdoms of the earth rejoice; for the Lord our God is about to establish a Kingdom, which cannot be thrown down, neither can the gates of hell prevail against it.
5th. Therefore, rejoice ye Elders of Israel; believe not the slangs and foul reports against our Beloved Brethren, Joseph Smith Jr. and Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, they are groundless, and as black as the apostate Authors, who will not protect that little stone that is hewn out of the mountain without hands, and who exerts their utmost endeavors to impede the progress of the Kingdom which God has set up, for the salvation of man in these last days.
6th. Be of good cheer then, ye ministers of the gospel, always abounding in faith and good works; ponder the paths of your feet; acknowedge the hand of God in all things; be instant in prayer, and your heavenly Father will direct your steps, lead you into all truth, and the Spirit of the living God will dwell richly upon you: even so Amen.
Alanson RIPLEY

8 Jan. 1798–before 1860. Surveyor, lawyer. Born at New York. Son of Asa Ripley and Polly Deforest. Married Sarah Finkle. Resided in Massachusetts, 1827. Member of LDS church in Ohio. Participated in Camp of Israel expedition to Missouri, 1834. Landholder ...

View Full Bio
.
————
Having a general knowledge of many of the counties in upper Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, and the welfare of the brethren of the church of Latter Day Saints in view: I will give a short history of the situation of the County of Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, and the regions round about.
Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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is situated about 50 miles North of Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
, on a beautiful elevated prairie, so that when the traveller approaches the town, though several miles from it, the eye catches the beautiful prospect, which leads the mind to wonder that a people almost wholly destitute of means, could accomplish so great work in so short time.
The County of Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
, is a beautiful elevated prairie County, interspersed with valleys, and beautiful groves of timber; the face of the country, is generally high and rolling, and renders it as healthy, as any part of the United States

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

More Info
.
The soil is very productive, insomuch that forty or fifty bushels of corn per acre is but midling yield, and equally as good for wheat, and all other kinds of grain, which is natural to the Western and Southern States.
Alanson RIPLEY

8 Jan. 1798–before 1860. Surveyor, lawyer. Born at New York. Son of Asa Ripley and Polly Deforest. Married Sarah Finkle. Resided in Massachusetts, 1827. Member of LDS church in Ohio. Participated in Camp of Israel expedition to Missouri, 1834. Landholder ...

View Full Bio
.
————
To the Saints scattered abroad;
Dear Brethren:
Whereas, many have taken into hand to set forth the order of the kingdom of God on earth, and have testified of the grace of God, as given unto them, to publish unto you.
I also feel it my duty to write unto you, touching the grace of God given unto me, to youward; concerning the dispensation we have received; which is the greatest of all dispensations.— And has been spoken of by the mouth of all the holy prophets since the world began.
In this, my communication to you, I design to notice some of these prophecies.
Now the apostle Paul says on this wise, “For I would not brethren, that you should be ignorant of this mystery, (lest you should be wise in your own conceit,) that blindness in part has happened unto Israel, until the fullness of the Gentiles be come in. And so all Israel shall be saved; as it is written, There shall come out of Sion a Deliverer, and shall turn away ungodliness from Jacob.”
What is that he says! “For I would not have you ignorant,” ignorant of what? why of this mystery, that blindness in part had happened unto Is [p. 39]
heart, that they must separate them selves from Babylon, lest ye be par takers of her sins, and likewise of her  plagues.
3rd. O ye Elders of Israel! lift up  your heads and rejoice, for the day of  your redemption draweth nigh, com fort yourselves, by pondering in your  hearts the grand events which will  transpire at the morn of the millenium;  when there shall be no mobs, to rise up  against you; no weapon formed against  you by lawless marauders; and no  tongue to scandalize your character,  by vain and groundless reports; know ing that this blessing will be placed up on your heads, when you return from  your ministry; and when the Judge of  the whole earth shall say, well done thou  good and faithful servant, thou hast  been faithful over a few things, I will  make the[e] ruler over many things; en ter thou into the joys of thy Lord.
4th. Lift up your heads then, ye  Elders of Israel, say to the North,  give up, to the South, keep not back.  Say to the Isles of the sea, be glad, and  to the Kingdoms of the earth rejoice;  for the Lord our God is about to estab lish a Kingdom, which cannot be  thrown down, neither can the gates of  hell prevail against it.
5th. Therefore, rejoice ye Elders of  Israel; believe not the slangs and foul  reports against our Beloved Brethren,  Joseph Smith Jr. and Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
,  they are groundless, and as black as  the apostate Authors, who will not pro tect that little stone that is hewn out of  the mountain without hands, and who  exerts their utmost endeavors to im pede the progress of the Kingdom  which God has set up, for the salvation  of man in these last days.
6th. Be of good cheer then, ye min isters of the gospel, always abounding  in faith and good works; ponder the  paths of your feet; acknowedge the  hand of God in all things; be instant  in prayer, and your heavenly Father  will direct your steps, lead you into all  truth, and the Spirit of the living God  will dwell richly upon you: even so  Amen.
A[lanson] RIPLEY

8 Jan. 1798–before 1860. Surveyor, lawyer. Born at New York. Son of Asa Ripley and Polly Deforest. Married Sarah Finkle. Resided in Massachusetts, 1827. Member of LDS church in Ohio. Participated in Camp of Israel expedition to Missouri, 1834. Landholder ...

View Full Bio
.
————
Having a general knowledge of  many of the counties in upper Missou ri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, and the welfare of the brethren of  the church of Latter Day Saints in  view: I will give a short history of the  situation of the County of Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
,  and the regions round about.
Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
is situated about 50 miles  North of Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

More Info
in Jackson  County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
, on a beautiful elevated prairie,  so that when the traveller approaches  the town, though several miles from it,  the eye catches the beautiful prospect,  which leads the mind to wonder that a  people almost wholly destitute of means,  could accomplish so great work in so  short time.
The County of Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
, is a beauti ful elevated prairie County, interspers ed with valleys, and beautiful groves  of timber; the face of the country, is  generally high and rolling, and renders  it as healthy, as any part of the United  States

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

More Info
.
The soil is very productive, inso much that forty or fifty bushels of corn  per acre is but midling yield, and equal ly as good for wheat, and all other  kinds of grain, which is natural to the  Western and Southern States.
A[lanson] RIPLEY

8 Jan. 1798–before 1860. Surveyor, lawyer. Born at New York. Son of Asa Ripley and Polly Deforest. Married Sarah Finkle. Resided in Massachusetts, 1827. Member of LDS church in Ohio. Participated in Camp of Israel expedition to Missouri, 1834. Landholder ...

View Full Bio
.
————
To the Saints scattered abroad;
Dear Brethren:
Whereas, many  have taken into hand to set forth the  order of the kingdom of God on earth,  and have testified of the grace of God,  as given unto them, to publish unto  you.
I also feel it my duty to write unto  you, touching the grace of God given  unto me, to youward; concerning the  dispensation we have received; which  is the greatest of all dispensations.—  And has been spoken of by the mouth  of all the holy prophets since the world  began.
In this, my communication to you,  I design to notice some of these proph ecies.
Now the apostle Paul says on this  wise, “For I would not brethren, that  you should be ignorant of this mystery,  (lest you should be wise in your own  conceit,) that blindness in part has hap pened unto Israel, until the fullness of  the Gentiles be come in. And so all  Israel shall be saved; as it is written,  There shall come out of Sion a Deliv erer, and shall turn away ungodliness  from Jacob.”
What is that he says! “For I  would not have you ignorant,” ignor ant of what? why of this mystery, that  blindness in part had happened unto Is [p. 39]
PreviousNext
In the final issue of the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, dated September 1837, a prospectus appeared announcing the forthcoming publication of the Elders’ Journal of the Church of Latter Day Saints. The following month, the first issue of the new paper appeared. The short-lived newspaper ran only four issues—two in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, dated October and November 1837; and two in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, Missouri, dated July and August 1838. For the two Far West issues, the title of the paper was changed to Elders’ Journal of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. JS is listed as editor for each of the four issues, with Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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listed as proprietor or publisher. It is unknown how labor was divided on the newspaper or how much immediate responsibility JS had for the content. The paper presumably would have continued with additional issues in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
had it not been for the escalating violence between Mormons and non-Mormons in late 1838, which culminated in the Mormons being driven from the state. After settling at Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

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, Illinois, the Saints began publishing a new paper, the Times and Seasons—though explicitly not as a successor to the Elders’ Journal.

Facts