53993049

Elders’ Journal, November 1837

No more to part, no more to sorrow,
The time is nigh ’twill be tomorrow.
I am as ever your
affectionate husband
ORSON HYDE

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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.
Marinda Hyde

28 June 1815–24 Mar. 1886. Born in Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont. Daughter of John Johnson and Alice (Elsa) Jacob. Baptized into LDS church, Apr. 1832, in Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Married Orson Hyde, 4 Sept. 1834...

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.
————
Troy, Ohio, Dec. 2, 1837.
Brother Don Carlos Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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:—
Sir, The folowing short extract of my journal kept during the past season is at your disposal, or for insertion in the Journal, if it is deemed worthy to occupy the pages of that highly interesting paper.
May 9th I left Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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in company with Elder Wm. Bosley, intending if Providence so directed to blow the trumpet of the gospel in New England, this season: Our first stop was in Madison, Ohio, where we spent a few days with the brethren of that place, held three meetings and baptized one. From thence we turned our course S. E. intending to visit those churches in Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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and Pa.

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

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that were built up by us in 1836. We arrived at elder Blanchards in Andover, Ashtabula Co. Ohio, on the evening of the 13th, about 10 o’clock, much fatigued as you will judge after learning that our journey for the last several miles, was through an abundance of mud and scores of tree tops, which you know are nothing uncommon in that country. The Andover church commenced its rise in Aug. 1836, by the instrumentality of elders Bosley and [Ebenezer] Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

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; The number of its members I have forgotten: we tarried preaching in Andover and its vicinity about ten days and baptized four: during the last two days of our tarry in that place, I was drawn into a debate with the Rev. Mr. Roberts, a learned clergyman of that place, upon the authenticity of the book of Mormon, which lasted about 8 hours.
Though I consented to the discussion to gratify the intense anxiety of many friends both in, and out of the church, yet I think it was productive of much good, for the weakness of error and the strength of truth were clearly manifested; and when we closed (about 12 o’clock in the evening of the second day) the aspect of the people was entirely changed: our meeting was held at the center of Andover, in the town house, which was full to overflowing, and many listened from without by the windows and in the waggons.
After discussion some others desired to be buried beneath the yielding wave, but feeling ourselves in a hurry we left it to be attended to by elder Adams and others of that place. May the 23rd, we took leave of the brethren and pursued our journey: on the evening of the 25th we arrived at elder Stevensons in Venango Co. Pa. in that vicinity we preached a few times, and added one to that branch. From thence we went South to Butler Co. visited two members near Unionsville and baptized one. Here I parted wlth brother Bosley and went to Beaver Co. When I visited the branch at Bridgewater elder F. Gladden Bishop

19 June 1809–30 Nov. 1864. Watchmaker, minister. Born at Livonia, Ontario Co., New York. Son of Isaac Gates Bishop and Mary Hyde. Served as minister in Freewill Baptist Church, by 1831. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, 2 July 1832, in Olean...

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had just left, having baptized eight. I tarried preaching in the vicinity until the 13th of June, and baptized one more. From there I bent my course to Brushvalley church, Indiana Co. where I again met with elder B. who had visited the Plum Creek branch, in Armstrong Co. unto which he added one member.
We tarried in Indiana Co. until we added 16 to that church. On the 25th of June we held a council with the church and its officers, and ordained John F. Wakefield (formerly teacher) to the office of an elder, and Wm. P. Mc’intire to that of a priest. Elders Bosley and Wakefield then left on a mission to the lower counties of Pa.

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

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— that they might cause light to spring up among those that sit in darkness and the shadow of death; for the Spirit in our councils directed us to abandon the idea of our eastern journey and take a southern mission. I started alone from Brushvalley, on the 3rd of July, and passing through several southern counties of Pa.

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

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I went as far as Washington Co. Md. about 40 miles from Baltimore.
In Washington, Franklin and Bedford counties, were my labors confined for about four months: It is a thickly populated, and wealthy country, but the ministers of our God had not visited their habitations, and the glorious sound of the fullness of the gospel had not saluted their ears: Though it is a place of many sects, I think not less than about fifteen, and battalions of priests very much divided. They have a factory for making them (priests) in Franklin Co. I suppose you know the machine by which they fashion them, and teach them the laws of interpretation. I of course met with considera [p. 22]
No more to part, no more to sorrow,
The time is nigh ’twill be tomorrow.
I am as ever your
affectionate husband
ORSON HYDE

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
.
Marinda Hyde

28 June 1815–24 Mar. 1886. Born in Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont. Daughter of John Johnson and Alice (Elsa) Jacob. Baptized into LDS church, Apr. 1832, in Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Married Orson Hyde, 4 Sept. 1834...

View Full Bio
.
————
Troy, Ohio, Dec. 2, 1837.
Brother Don C[arlos] Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

View Full Bio
:—
Sir, The folow ing short extract of my journal kept  during the past season is at your dis posal, or for insertion in the Journal, if  it is deemed worthy to occupy the pa ges of that highly interesting paper.
May 9th I left Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
in company  with Elder Wm. Bosley, intending if  Providence so directed to blow the  trumpet of the gospel in New England,  this season: Our first stop was in Mad ison, Ohio, where we spent a few days  with the brethren of that place, held  three meetings and baptized one. From  thence we turned our course S. E. in tending to visit those churches in Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

More Info
 and Pa.

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

More Info
that were built up by us in  1836. We arrived at elder Blanch ards in Andover, As[h]tabula Co. Ohio,  on the evening of the 13th, about 10  o’clock, much fatigued as you will  judge after learning that our journey  for the last several miles, was through  an abundance of mud and scores of  tree tops, which you know are nothing  uncommon in that country. The An dover church commenced its rise in  Aug. 1836, by the instrumentality of  elders Bosley and [Ebenezer] Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

View Full Bio
; The num ber of its members I have forgotten:  we tarried preaching in Andover and  its vicinity about ten days and baptized  four: during the last two days of our  tarry in that place, I was drawn into a  debate with the Rev. Mr. Roberts, a  learned clergyman of that place, upon  the authenticity of the book of Mormon,  which lasted about 8 hours.
Though I consented to the discussion  to gratify the intense anxiety of many  friends both in, and out of the church,  yet I think it was productive of much  good, for the weakness of error and  the strength of truth were clearly man ifested; and when we closed (about 12  o’clock in the evening of the second  day) the aspect of the people was en tirely changed: our meeting was held  at the center of Andover, in the town  house, which was full to overflowing,  and many listened from without by the  windows and in the waggons.
After discussion some others desired  to be buried beneath the yielding wave,  but feeling ourselves in a hurry we left  it to be attended to by elder Adams and  others of that place. May the 23rd,  we took leave of the brethren and pur sued our journey: on the evening of  the 25th we arrived at elder Stevensons  in Venango Co. Pa. in that vicinity  we preached a few times, and added  one to that branch. From thence we  went South to Butler Co. visited two  members near Unionsville and baptiz ed one. Here I parted wlth brother  Bosley and went to Be[a]ver Co. When  I visited the branch at Bridgewater el der F. G[ladden] Bishop

19 June 1809–30 Nov. 1864. Watchmaker, minister. Born at Livonia, Ontario Co., New York. Son of Isaac Gates Bishop and Mary Hyde. Served as minister in Freewill Baptist Church, by 1831. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, 2 July 1832, in Olean...

View Full Bio
had just left, having  baptized eight. I tarried preaching in  the vicinity until the 13th of June, and  baptized one more. From there I bent  my course to Brushvalley church, In diana Co. where I again met with el der B. who had visited the Plum Creek  branch, in Armstrong Co. unto which  he added one member.
We tarried in Indiana Co. until we  added 16 to that church. On the 25th  of June we held a council with the  church and its officers, and ordained  John F. Wakefield (formerly teacher)  to the office of an elder, and Wm. P.  Mc’intire to that of a priest. Elders  Bosley and Wakefield then left on a  mission to the lower counties of Pa.

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

More Info
 that they might cause light to spring  up among those that sit in darkness  and the shadow of death; for the Spirit  in our councils directed us to abandon  the idea of our eastern journey and  take a southern mission. I started a lone from Brushvalley, on the 3rd  of July, and passing through several  southern counties of Pa.

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

More Info
I went as far  as Washington Co. Md. about 40 miles  from Baltimore.
In Washington, Franklin and Bed ford counties, were my labors confined  for about four months: It is a thickly  populated, and wealthy country, but  the ministers of our God had not visit ed their habitations, and the glorious  sound of the fullness of the gospel had  not saluted their ears: Though it is a  place of many sects, I think not less  than about fifteen, and battalions of  priests very much divided. They have  a factory for making them (priests) in  Franklin Co. I suppose you know the  machine by which they fashion them,  and teach them the laws of interpreta tion. I of course met with considera [p. 22]
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In the final issue of the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, dated September 1837, a prospectus appeared announcing the forthcoming publication of the Elders’ Journal of the Church of Latter Day Saints. The following month, the first issue of the new paper appeared. The short-lived newspaper ran only four issues—two in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, dated October and November 1837; and two in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri, dated July and August 1838. For the two Far West issues, the title of the paper was changed to Elders’ Journal of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. JS is listed as editor for each of the four issues, with Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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listed as proprietor or publisher. It is unknown how labor was divided on the newspaper or how much immediate responsibility JS had for the content. The paper presumably would have continued with additional issues in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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had it not been for the escalating violence between Mormons and non-Mormons in late 1838, which culminated in the Mormons being driven from the state. After settling at Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

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, Illinois, the Saints began publishing a new paper, the Times and Seasons—though explicitly not as a successor to the Elders’ Journal.

Facts