53993048

Elders’ Journal, October 1837

love to all enquiring friends; write when you receive this, and let this sheet be an example for you, this to my dearest friend.
HEBER KIMBALL

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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.
Vilate Kimball.
————
Terre Haute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

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, Indiana. Oct. 13th, 1837.
Brother Don Carlos Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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,
Dear Sir:
Having arrived here last evening in a heavy shower of rain, and calculating to pursue our journey on the morrow, I thought I would occupy part of the day, in writing a few lines to you for the Journal.
This place is about five hundred miles from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, and about half way from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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to the city of Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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; which makes the distance from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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to the Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, one thousand miles.
Part of the way the roads were excedingly good, and part of the way, were as bad as they could well be.— The immence travel on the national road is incredible, and this composed of all classes, and discriptions of character. Here indeed you may see the rich and the poor, the noble and ignoble, all traveling together along the same way; just like they have to the grave, the common lot of all.
I observed as I passed through Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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, that there was quite a diversity of both soil and timber, some parts of Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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through which we passed, I think is not surpassed in any part of the country, for fertility of soil, beauty of attraction, and splendor of improvements. I have not, as yet, to this point seen any thing to equal it.
Through Indiana

First settled by French at Vincennes, early 1700s. Acquired by England in French and Indian War, 1763. U.S. took possession of area following American Revolution, 1783. Area became part of Northwest Territory, 1787. Partitioned off of Northwest Territory ...

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, there is a much greater uniformity of soil, timber, and surface, than in Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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, I mean in the parts through which we passed. From the time we crossed the state line, until say within 12 or 15 miles from this place, there is a uniformity in soil, timber, and surface, that amounts to a dull monotony in the eye of the observer. The timber is principly beech and maple. The surface is very flat; and the soil not above second quality, if it would be considered of that qality
Indiana

First settled by French at Vincennes, early 1700s. Acquired by England in French and Indian War, 1763. U.S. took possession of area following American Revolution, 1783. Area became part of Northwest Territory, 1787. Partitioned off of Northwest Territory ...

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as far as I have traveled through it, until I came within a few miles of this place, does not justify the general report which has been given of it; at least, I confess, that I was disappointed, not finding the country as good as I expected from report.
There are a multitude of villages springing up on the national road, of which Richmond, Indianapolis, and Tere Haute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

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are principle, of these three, I should consider Richmond quite in advance of the others. Indianapolis, the seat of government, is a village of considerable size; but the buildings are generally small, many of them from one, to one story and a half high, and very few excel two storys high.— The greater part of the houses are wood.—The town is built on the east side of White river: the situation is plesant, and would admit of a city of the largest size.
This vilage (Terehaute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

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) is situated on the east side of the wabash, which is a beautiful river, and flows majestically along the west side of the village

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

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. The steamboats ascend the river to this point. The village

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

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is situated on a wide spreading prairy of exceedingly rich soil, and the surface is level, and presents a sublime prospect, to the eye of the traveler as he comes from the east. From where the national road enters the prariy; it is about three miles to the river, where the village

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

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stands.
The prices of land on the national road is astonishing; take it at any point you will, and you will find, the wild land, from twenty to thirty dollars per acre; while the improved land, is from fifty to a hundred, according to the situation and improvements.
No thinking mind can travel through the country, and observe the ways of man and things, without deep reflection. In passing along you will see wealth, beauty, and eligance, flowing in all richness, and the next minute, you will see poverty, want, and wretchedness, praying like a vulture upon the happiness of their subjects. The wretchedness and sufferings which abound in many habitations, makes the heart sicken, and throws a gloominess over the spirit of the philanthrophist.
A person who is acquainted with the purposes and work of God in the last days, by traveling only increases his desire, that the great work of God may be speadily accomplished; for the amelioration of the world depends intirely on the accomplishment of the purposes of God. For this cause, the intel [p. 7]
love to all enquiring friends; write  when you receive this, and let this  sheet be an example for you, this to my  dearest friend.
HEBER KIMBALL

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

View Full Bio
.
Vilate Kimball.
————
Ter[r]e Haute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

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, I[ndian]a. Oct. 13th, 1837.
Brother Don C[arlos] Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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,
Dear Sir:
Having arrived  here last evening in a heavy shower of  rain, and calculating to pursue our  journey on the morrow, I thought I  would occupy part of the day, in wri ting a few lines to you for the Journal.
This place is about five hundred  miles from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, and about half  way from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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to the city of Far  West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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; which makes the distance from  Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
to the Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, one thou sand miles.
Part of the way the roads were ex cedingly good, and part of the way,  were as bad as they could well be.—  The immence travel on the national  road is incredible, and this compo sed of all classes, and discriptions  of character. Here indeed you may  see the rich and the poor, the noble  and ignoble, all traveling together a long the same way; just like they have  to the grave, the common lot of all.
I observed as I passed through Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

More Info
,  that there was quite a diversity of both  soil and timber, some parts of Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

More Info
 through which we passed, I think is  not surpassed in any part of the coun try, for fertility of soil, beauty of at traction, and splendor of improvements.  I have not, as yet, to this point seen  any thing to equal it.
Through Indiana

First settled by French at Vincennes, early 1700s. Acquired by England in French and Indian War, 1763. U.S. took possession of area following American Revolution, 1783. Area became part of Northwest Territory, 1787. Partitioned off of Northwest Territory ...

More Info
, there is a much  greater uniformity of soil, timber, and  surface, than in Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

More Info
, I mean in the  parts through which we passed. From  the time we crossed the state line, until  say within 12 or 15 miles from this  place, there is a uniformity in soil,  timber, and surface, that amounts to a  dull monotony in the eye of the obser ver. The timber is principly beech  and maple. The surface is very flat;  and the soil not above second quality,  if it would be considered of that qal ity
Indiana

First settled by French at Vincennes, early 1700s. Acquired by England in French and Indian War, 1763. U.S. took possession of area following American Revolution, 1783. Area became part of Northwest Territory, 1787. Partitioned off of Northwest Territory ...

More Info
as far as I have traveled  through it, until I came within a few  miles of this place, does not justify the  general report which has been given of  it; at least, I confess, that I was disap pointed, not finding the country as good  as I expected from report.
There are a multitude of villages  springing up on the national road, of  which Richmond, Indianapolis, and Te re Haute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

More Info
are principle, of these three,  I should consider Richmond quite in  advance of the others. Indianapolis,  the seat of government, is a village of  considerable size; but the buildings are  generally small, many of them from  one, to one story and a half high, and  very few excel two storys high.—  The greater part of the houses are  wood.—The town is built on the east  side of White river: the situation is ples ant, and would admit of a city of the  largest size.
This vilage (Terehaute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

More Info
) is situated  on the east side of the wabash, which  is a beautiful river, and flows majesti cally along the west side of the village

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

More Info
.  The steamboats ascend the river to  this point. The village

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

More Info
is situated on  a wide spreading prairy of exceeding ly rich soil, and the surface is level,  and presents a sublime prospect, to the  eye of the traveler as he comes from  the east. From where the national  road enters the prariy; it is about three  miles to the river, where the village

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

More Info
 stands.
The prices of land on the national  road is astonishing; take it at any point  you will, and you will find, the wild  land, from twenty to thirty dollars per  acre; while the improved land, is from  fifty to a hundred, according to the  situation and improvements.
No thinking mind can travel through  the country, and observe the ways of  man and things, without deep reflection.  In passing along you will see wealth,  beauty, and eligance, flowing in all  richness, and the next minute, you  will see poverty, want, and wretched ness, praying like a vulture upon the  happiness of their subjects. The  wretchedness and sufferings which a bound in many habitations, makes  the heart sicken, and throws a gloomi ness over the spirit of the philanthro phist.
A person who is acquainted with the  purposes and work of God in the last  days, by traveling only increases his  desire, that the great work of God may  be speadily accomplished; for the amel ioration of the world depends intirely  on the accomplishment of the purpo ses of God. For this cause, the intel [p. 7]
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In the final issue of the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, dated September 1837, a prospectus appeared announcing the forthcoming publication of the Elders’ Journal of the Church of Latter Day Saints. The following month, the first issue of the new paper appeared. The short-lived newspaper ran only four issues—two in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, dated October and November 1837; and two in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri, dated July and August 1838. For the two Far West issues, the title of the paper was changed to Elders’ Journal of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. JS is listed as editor for each of the four issues, with Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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listed as proprietor or publisher. It is unknown how labor was divided on the newspaper or how much immediate responsibility JS had for the content. The paper presumably would have continued with additional issues in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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had it not been for the escalating violence between Mormons and non-Mormons in late 1838, which culminated in the Mormons being driven from the state. After settling at Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

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, Illinois, the Saints began publishing a new paper, the Times and Seasons—though explicitly not as a successor to the Elders’ Journal.

Facts