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“Extract, from the Private Journal of Joseph Smith Jr.,” July 1839

“Extract, from the Private Journal of Joseph Smith Jr.,” July 1839

the prophets, which have spoken since the world began. We shall therefore do well to discern the signs of the times, as we pass along, that the day of the Lord may not “overtake us as a thief in the night.”96

See Revelation, 25 Nov. 1834, in Doctrine and Covenants 99:2, 1835 ed. [D&C 106:4]; compare 2 Peter 3:10.  


Afflictions, persecutions, imprisonments and deaths, we must expect according to the scriptures, which tell us, that the blood of those whose souls were under the altar, could not be avenged on them that dwell on the earth, until their brethren should be slain, as they were.97

See Revelation 6:9–11.  


If these transactions had taken place among barbarians, under the authority of a despot; or in a nation, where a certain religion is established according to law, and all others proscribed; then there might have been some shadow of defence offered. But can we realize, that in a land which is the cradle of Liberty and equal rights; and where the voice of the conquerors, who had vanquished our foes, had scarcely died away upon our ears, where we frequently mingled with those who had stood amidst the “battle and the breeze;”98

Phrase taken from Thomas Campbell (1777–1844), “Ye Mariners of England: A Naval Ode.”  


and whose arms have been nerved in the defence of their country and liberty: whose institutions are the theme of philosophers and poets, and held up to the admiration of the whole civilized world. In the midst of all these scenes, with which we were surrounded, a persecution, the most unwarrantable, was commenced; and a tragedy, the most dreadful, was enacted, by a large portion of the inhabitants, of one of those free and independent States, which comprise this vast republic; and a deadly blow was struck at the institutions, for which our Fathers had fought many a hard battle, and for which, many a Patriot had shed his blood; and suddenly, was heard, amidst the voice of joy and gratitude for our national liberty, the voice of mourning, lamentation and woe. Yes, in this land, a mob, regardless of those laws, for which so much blood had been spilled, dead to every feeling of virtue and patriotism, which animate the bosom of freemen; fell upon a people whose religious faith was different from their own; and not only destroyed their homes, drove them away, and carried off their property, but murderd many a free born son of America

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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. A tragedy, which has no parrallel in modern, and hardly in ancient times; even the face of the Red man would be ready to turn pale at the recital of it.
It would have been some consolation, if the authorities of the State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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had been innocent in this affair, but they are involved in the guilt thereof; and the blood of innocence, even of children, cry for vengeance upon them. I ask the citizens of this vast republic, whether such a state of things is to be suffered to pass unnoticed, and the hearts of widows, orphans and patriots, to be broken, and their wrongs left without redress? No! I invoke the genius of our constitution, I appeal to the patriotism of Americans, to stop this unlawful and unholy proceedure; and pray that God may defend this nation from the dreadful effects of such outrages. Is there not virtue in the body politic? Will not the people rise up in their majesty, and with that promptitude and zeal, which is so characteristic of them, discountenance such proceedings, by bringing the offenders to that purnishment which they so richly deserve; and save the nation from that disgrace and ultimate ruin, which otherwise must inevitably fall upon it?
JOSEPH SMITH JR. [p. 9]
the prophets, which have spoken since  the world began. We shall therefore  do well to discern the signs of the times,  as we pass along, that the day of the  Lord may not “overtake us as a thief  in the night.”96

See Revelation, 25 Nov. 1834, in Doctrine and Covenants 99:2, 1835 ed. [D&C 106:4]; compare 2 Peter 3:10.  


Afflictions, persecu tions, imprisonments and deaths, we  must expect according to the scriptures,  which tell us, that the blood of those  whose souls were under the altar, could  not be avenged on them that dwell on  the earth, until their brethren should  be slain, as they were.97

See Revelation 6:9–11.  


If these transactions had taken place  among barbarians, under the authority  of a despot; or in a nation, where a  certain religion is established accord ing to law, and all others proscribed;  then there might have been some shad ow of defence offered. But can we  realize, that in a land which is the cra dle of Liberty and equal rights; and  where the voice of the conquerors, who  had vanquished our foes, had scarcely  died away upon our ears, where we  frequently mingled with those who had  stood amidst the “battle and the breeze;”98

Phrase taken from Thomas Campbell (1777–1844), “Ye Mariners of England: A Naval Ode.”  


 and whose arms have been nerved in  the defence of their country and liber ty: whose institutions are the theme of  philosophers and poets, and held up to  the admiration of the whole civilized  world. In the midst of all these scenes,  with which we were surrounded, a per secution, the most unwarrantable, was  commenced; and a tragedy, the most  dreadful, was enacted, by a large por tion of the inhabitants, of one of those  free and independent States, which  comprise this vast republic; and a  deadly blow was struck at the institu tions, for which our Fathers had fought  many a hard battle, and for which,  many a Patriot had shed his blood; and  suddenly, was heard, amidst the voice  of joy and gratitude for our national  liberty, the voice of mourning, lamen tation and woe. Yes, in this land, a  mob, regardless of those laws, for  which so much blood had been spilled,  dead to every feeling of virtue and pa triotism, which animate the bosom of  freemen; fell upon a people whose reli gious faith was different from their own;  and not only destroyed their homes,  drove them away, and carried off their  property, but murderd many a free  born son of America

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

More Info
. A tragedy,  which has no parrallel in modern, and  hardly in ancient times; even the face  of the Red man would be ready to turn  pale at the recital of it.
It would have been some consolation,  if the authorities of the State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
had been  innocent in this affair, but they are in volved in the guilt thereof; and the  blood of innocence, even of children,  cry for vengeance upon them. I ask  the citizens of this vast republic, wheth er such a state of things is to be suff ered to pass unnoticed, and the hearts  of widows, orphans and patriots, to be  broken, and their wrongs left without  redress? No! I invoke the genius of our  constitution, I appeal to the patriotism  of Americans, to stop this unlawful  and unholy proceedure; and pray that  God may defend this nation from the  dreadful effects of such outrages. Is  there not virtue in the body politic?  Will not the people rise up in their  majesty, and with that promptitude and  zeal, which is so characteristic of them,  discountenance such proceedings, by  bringing the offenders to that purnish ment which they so richly deserve;  and save the nation from that disgrace  and ultimate ruin, which otherwise  must inevitably fall upon it?
JOSEPH SMITH JR. [p. 9]
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JS, “Extract, from the Private Journal of Joseph Smith Jr.,” in Times and Seasons (Commerce, IL), July 1839, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 2–9; edited by Ebenezer Robinson and Don Carlos Smith; includes typeset signature. The copy used for transcription is currently part of a bound volume held at CHL.
The eight-page article is the second item in the first number of the Times and Seasons. This issue comprises eight leaves, making sixteen pages that measure 8⅝ x 5¼ inches (22 x 13 cm). The text on each page is set in two columns. It is unknown how long this copy of this issue of the Times and Seasons has been in church custody.

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