53991846

Grammar and Alphabet of the Egyptian Language, circa July–circa December 1835

Grammar and Alphabet of the Egyptian Language, circa July–circa December 1835

No.CharacterGrammar & Alphabet of the Egyptian Language
1HThis is called Za Ki=oan hiash, or chal sidon hiash. This character is in the fiftth degree, independent and abitrary. It may be preseved in the fifth degree while it stands independent and arbitrary: That is, without a straight mark inserted above or below it. By inserting a straight mark
2Hover it thus, (2) it increases its signification five
3Hdegrees: by inserting two straight lines, thus: (3) its signification is increased five times more. By inserting
4Hthree straight lines thus (4) its signification is again increased five times more than the last. By counting the numbers of straight lines or considering them as qualifying adjectives we have the degrees of comparison There are five connecting parts of speech in the above character, called Za-ki an hish These five connecting parts of speech, for verbs, participles— prepositions, conjuntions, and adverbs. In translating this character, this subject must be continued until there are as many of these connecting parts of speech used as there are connections or connecting parts found in the character. But whinever the character is found with one horizontal line, as at (2) the subject must be continued until five times the number of connecting parts of speech are used; or, the full sense of the writer is not conveyed. When two horizontal lines occur, the number of connecting parts of speech are continued five times furthr— or five degrees. And when three horizontal lines are found, the number of connections are to be increased five time further. The character alone has 5 parts of speech: increase by one straight line thus 5x5 is 25
[p. 1]

William W. Phelps handwriting begins.  


No.
CharacterGrammar & A[l]phabet of the Egyptian Language
1HThis is called Za Ki=oan hiash, <or> chal sidon hiash.  This character is in the fiftth degree, independ ent and abitrary. It may be preseved in the  fifth degree while it stands independent and arbi trary: That is, without a straight mark inserted  above or below it. By inserting a straight mark
2Hover it thus, (2) it increases its signification five
3Hdegrees: by inserting two straight lines, thus: (3) its signi fication is increased five times more. By inserting
4Hthree straight lines thus (4) its signification is again  increased five times more than the last. By counting  the numbers of st[r]aight lines and preseving them, or  considering them as qualifying adjectives we  have the degrees of comparison There are  five connecting parts of speech in the above  character, called Za-ki an hish These five  connecting parts of speech, for verbs, particip les— prepositions, conjuntions, and adverbs.  In translation translating this chara[c]ter, this subject  must be continued until there are as many  of these connecting parts of speech used as there  are connections or connecting parts found in  the character. But whinever the character is  found with one horizontal line, as at (2) the  subject must be continued until twice <five times> the number  of connecting parts of speech are used; or, the  full sense of the writer is not conveyed. When  two horizontal lines occur, the number of con ne[c]ting parts of speech are continued five times  furthr— or five degrees. And when three horizontal  lines are found, the number of connections are to be  increased five time further. The character alone has  5 parts of speech: increase by one straight line thus 5x5 is 25
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“Grammar and Alphabet of the Egyptian Language,” [Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, OH, ca. July–ca. Dec. 1835]; handwriting of William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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and Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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; 34 pages; Kirtland Egyptian Papers, CHL.
The 34 inscribed pages are numbered 1–34. There are 188 blank pages interspersed among the inscribed pages. Blocks of text start on pages 1, 8, 12, 15, 19, 23, 27, 29, 31, and 33.

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