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History, 1834–1836

Noah Packard

7 May 1796–17 Feb. 1860. Farmer, surveyor, miner. Born at Plainfield, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Noah Packard and Molly Hamblin. Moved to Parkman, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1817. Married Sophia Bundy, 29 June 1820, at Parkman. Baptized into LDS church by...

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, who came to his house and loaned the Chapel  Committee,154

In June 1833, Hyrum Smith, Reynolds Cahoon, and Jared Carter were appointed as a committee to direct the construction of the House of the Lord in Kirtland. (Minute Book 1, 6 June 1833.)
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Minute Book 1 / “Conference A,” 1832–1837. CHL. Also available at josephsmithpapers.org.

one thousand dollars, for the building of the house of the House of the  Lord

JS revelation of Jan. 1831 directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” JS Revelation of Dec. 1832 directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS Revelation of 1 June 1833 chastened Saints...

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in this place. O may God bless him an hundred  fold, even of this worlds goods, for this act of virtuous liberality.  He then as if soliloquizing, writes in his journal. My heart  is full of desire this day, to be blessed of the God of Abraham, with  prosperity, until I shall be able to pay all my debts, for it is  the delight of my soul to be honest, O Lord, that thou knowest  right well! help me, and I will give to the poor.

23 September 1835 • Wednesday

September 23d This day three of his brethren, (viz.) Wm.

26 June 1812–29 Mar. 1877. Farmer. Born at Groton, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Son of John Tippets and Abigail Pierce (Pearce). Baptized into LDS church, by 1834. Lived at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1834–1835. Participated in Camp of Israel expedition to...

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John

5 Sept. 1810–14 Feb. 1890. Mail carrier, farmer. Born at Wilton, Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of John Tippets and Abigail Pierce. Lived at Lewis, Essex Co., New York, 1813–1834. Baptized into LDS church by Elijah Collins, July 1832. Married first Abigail...

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& Joseph  Tibbits [Tippets]

4 June 1814–12 Oct. 1868. Locksmith, cabinetmaker, farmer. Born at Lewis, Essex Co., New York. Son of Joseph Tippets and Abigail Lewis. Baptized into LDS church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1834. Moved to Missouri, 1835. Married first Rosalia Elvira...

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called on him to bid him farewell, having set out on a  journey to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, the place designated by the Lord, for the gath ering of the Saints in these last days,155

The corresponding entry in the 1835–1836 journal specifies that Missouri is “designated for Zion.” On 28 November 1834, the Kirtland high council met to consider a letter from church members in Essex County, New York, presented by John and Joseph Tippets. The letter listed money and property totaling $848.40 collected to purchase land in Missouri. The two men were advised to remain in Kirtland during the winter and lend part of their money to the church there. At a high council meeting on 24 August 1835, the Tippetses were counseled to resume their journey to Missouri in the fall. This entry marks their departure. (Minute Book 1, 28 Nov. 1834 and 24 Aug. 1835; see also Revelation, 20 July 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 27:1, 1835 ed. [D&C 57:2].)
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Minute Book 1 / “Conference A,” 1832–1837. CHL. Also available at josephsmithpapers.org.

Doctrine and Covenants of the Church of the Latter Day Saints: Carefully Selected from the Revelations of God. Compiled by Joseph Smith, Oliver Cowdery, Sidney Rigdon, and Frederick G. Williams. Kirtland, OH: F. G. Williams, 1835. Also available in Robin Scott Jensen, Richard E. Turley Jr., Riley M. Lorimer, eds., Revelations and Translations, Volume 2: Published Revelations. Vol. 2 of the Revelations and Translations series of The Joseph Smith Papers, edited by Dean C. Jessee, Ronald K. Esplin, and Richard Lyman Bushman (Salt Lake City: Church Historian’s Press, 2011).

A number of brethren  came in to pray with them. Brother David Whitmer

7 Jan. 1805–25 Jan. 1888. Farmer, livery keeper. Born near Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Raised Presbyterian. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, shortly after birth. Attended German Reformed Church. Arranged...

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took the lead  and truly prayed in the spirit, and to use the expression of the  subject of our narrative, a glorious time succeeded his prayer;  joy filled our hearts and we blessed them & bid them God speed.  We promised them a safe journey and bid them adiue for a season.  O may God grant them long life and good days. These blessings  I ask for them, in the name of Christ, Amen.

24 September 1835 • Thursday

September 24th. This day the High Council of the Church met at  his house to take into consideration the afflictions of Zion, and  to devize means for her redemption. It was the voice of the Spirit  of the Lord, that a petition be sent to the governor

14 Jan. 1790–25 July 1844. Farmer, tavern owner, businessman, investor, lawyer, politician. Born near Greenville, Greenville District, South Carolina. Son of Joseph Dunklin Jr. and Sarah Margaret Sullivan. Moved to what became Caldwell Co., Kentucky, 1806...

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of the state of  Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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,156

Daniel Dunklin, governor of Missouri 1832–1836.  

 
praying for his assistance in his official capacity, in  restoring those to their possessions in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, who had  previously been driven from them by a lawless mob.157

The petition, dated 10 September 1834, was apparently circulated among the Saints and by 30 December 1835 was forwarded to Governor Daniel Dunklin from Kirtland, Ohio, with several hundred signatures attached. The corresponding entry in JS’s 1835–1836 journal describes this petition more forcefully: “we petition to the Governer that is those who have been driven out should do so to be set back on their Lands next spring and we go next season to live or dy in Jackson County.” In a November 1834 message to the Missouri legislature, Daniel Dunklin made reference to the “outrages” committed against the Mormons and noted that “these unfortunate people are now forbidden to take possession of their homes.” A copy of Dunklin’s speech arrived in Kirtland in mid-December 1834, reviving hopes that Latter-day Saint losses might be redressed. Following this news, JS counseled the church members in Missouri to “make but little or no stir in that region, and cause as little excitement as possible and endure their afflictions patiently until the time appointed— and the Governor of Mo. fulfils his promise in setting the church over upon their own lands.” (Petition to Daniel Dunklin, 10 Sept. 1834, copy, William W. Phelps, Collection of Missouri Documents, CHL; JS History, vol. B-1, 559, 563; Whitmer, History, 79.)
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Phelps, William W. Collection of Missouri documents, 1833–1837. CHL.

JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). CHL. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

Whitmer, History / Whitmer, John. “The Book of John Whitmer Kept by Commandment,” ca. 1838–1847. CCLA.

The brethren had a good time, and covenanted to struggle for  this, their favorite object, until death dissolve this union; and  if one falls, the rest are not to abandon the pursuit, but struggle  on, until the ultimate object is attained, which, they prayed  that God would grant unto them, in the name of Jesus Christ.
September 24th <25th>158

JS’s 1835–1836 journal has “24th”.  

 
He drew an article for his brethren to sign  who were willing to go next Spring and assist in the redemp tion of Zion.159

This action reflects JS’s firm intention to return to Missouri in spring 1836 with an armed expedition to repossess Mormon property. For John Whitmer’s description of this meeting, see Whitmer, History, 81.
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Whitmer, History / Whitmer, John. “The Book of John Whitmer Kept by Commandment,” ca. 1838–1847. CCLA.

He felt to ask God in the name of Jesus, that  eight hundred or one thousand men, well armed would vol unteer to accomplish that great work.

25 September 1835 • Friday

September 25th This day he remained at home, and  nothing of note transpired during the day. [p. 106]
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JS, History, [Dec. 1834–May 1836?]; handwriting of Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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, Warren Cowdery

17 Oct. 1788–23 Feb. 1851. Physician, druggist, farmer, editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Married Patience Simonds, 22 Sept. 1814, in Pawlet, Rutland Co. Moved to Freedom, Cattaraugus Co., New York, 1816...

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, Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, and Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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; includes genealogical and financial tables; 154 pages; verso of JS History, 1838–1856, vol. A-1, CHL. Includes redactions, use marks, and archival marking.
Large blank book composed of ruled paper printed with forty horizontal lines in (now faint) blue ink. The text block includes thirty gatherings of various sizes, each about a dozen leaves per gathering, and originally had 384 interior leaves cut to measure 13⅝ x 9 inches (35 x 23 cm). The text block, which was conserved in the late twentieth century, was probably originally sewn on recessed cords and was apparently also glued on leather tapes. The binding features false bands. The endpapers were single-sided marbled leaves featuring a traditional Spanish pattern with slate blue body and black and red veins. The block was bound to pasteboard covers, probably with a hollow-back ledger binding, making a book measuring 14¼ x 9½ x 2½ inches (36 x 24 x 6 cm). The boards were bound in brown suede calfskin. At some point, blind-tooled decorations were made around the outside border and along the board edges and the turned-in edges of the inside covers.
Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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began the text of the document on the thirteenth page of the text block, numbering it as page 9. Cowdery set aside pages 9–16 for genealogical tables for the members of the church presidency. He inscribed the page numbers, table headings, and column and row ruling for the tables in red ink with a quill pen. The content of the tables was inscribed in ink that is now brown with a quill pen, as was the rest of the history. Cowdery inscribed journal-like entries for 5 and 6 December 1834 on pages 17–20. Pages 21–45 are blank except for page numbering. Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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and Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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copied Cowdery’s 1834–1835 historical articles, published serially in the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, onto pages 46–103. A passage that Parrish missed while copying the first installment of the Cowdery history is supplied on a slip of paper attached to page 50 with adhesive wafers. On pages 103–104, Parrish copied part of a JS letter, also published in the church newspaper. On pages 105–187, Parrish and Warren Cowdery

17 Oct. 1788–23 Feb. 1851. Physician, druggist, farmer, editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Married Patience Simonds, 22 Sept. 1814, in Pawlet, Rutland Co. Moved to Freedom, Cattaraugus Co., New York, 1816...

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wrote historical entries based on the entries in JS’s 1835–1836 journal. The genealogical table headings written by Oliver Cowdery, the letter headings and closings written by Williams and Parrish, and the datelines written by Parrish and Warren Cowdery are slightly larger than the ordinary script of these individuals. Parrish’s datelines also feature a vertical stress that contrasts with the oblique stress of his entry inscriptions. In their copying from the Messenger and Advocate, Frederick G. Williams and Warren Parrish often used a slightly larger script for words that appear in small caps in the printed version. Although pagination for the 1834–1836 history was inscribed up to page 241, the actual chronicle reaches only to page 187. Oliver Cowdery numbered pages 9–21, Frederick G. Williams numbered pages 22–58, Warren Parrish numbered pages 59–111, and Warren Cowdery numbered pages 112–241. Sometime later, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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inscribed year and month-and-year headings in black ink on pages 17–20, 46–47, 105–173, and 176–187. Various pages also bear redactions in unidentified handwriting in black and blue pencil.
In 1839, the book was repurposed for the inscription of a new history. The book was turned over so that the back cover became the front and the last leaf became the first. From this new front of the book, JS’s scribes began writing what became the first volume of JS’s multivolume manuscript history (the first 61 pages of which are transcribed as “Draft 2”). That later history filled most of the remaining leaves of the book, running well into the blank pages that were numbered for the 1834–1836 history and up to within five pages of the inscribed entries in the earlier history. However, only numbering on pages 235–241 of the 1834–1836 history were erased (by knife eraser). With the later history’s side of the book upward, the spine of the book was labeled as volume “A | 1” of the multivolume history. Archival stickers were also added at some point to the spine and the inside front cover. Two interior leaves are now missing from the initial gathering of the volume and one leaf is missing from the final gathering. The flyleaves and pastedowns were also lost or removed from the book.1

See JS History, vol. A-1, microfilm, Dec. 1971, CHL. Only one leaf of the original pastedowns and flyleaves is extant. The pastedowns were replaced with undecorated paper in 1994, according to a conservation note on the verso of the extant marbled leaf archived with the volume.
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

JS History, vol. A-1. Microfilm, Dec. 1971. CHL.

The volume shows moderate wear, browning, water staining, and brittleness. It has been resewn, rebound, and otherwise conserved.
While the 1834–1836 history was being created, the volume was apparently kept in the homes of JS’s scribes.2

See JS, Journal, 29 Oct. 1835 and 25 Jan. 1836 (see also entry for 29 Oct. 1835 herein).  

 
In 1839, scribe James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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converted the book into the first volume of JS’s multivolume manuscript history.3

Jessee, “Writing of Joseph Smith’s History,” 439–441, 450–451, 464.
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Jessee, Dean C. “The Writing of Joseph Smith’s History.” BYU Studies 11 (Summer 1971): 439–473.

In 1842, the church newspaper in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, began publishing this later history.4

The serialized publication of this history began in the 15 March 1842 issue of the Times and Seasons.
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Times and Seasons. Commerce/Nauvoo, IL. Nov. 1839–Feb. 1846.

JS maintained custody of the volume through his later life, as indicated by a note he inscribed memorializing his deceased brother Alvin Smith

11 Feb. 1798–19 Nov. 1823. Farmer, carpenter. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; returned to Tunbridge, before May 1803. Moved to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804, and to...

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, which was attached to the verso of the flyleaf preceding the later history. The volume is listed in the first extant Historian’s Office inventory, made in Nauvoo in February 1846 by clerk Thomas Bullock, and it is listed in inventories of church records made in Salt Lake City in the second half of the nineteenth century.5

“Schedule of Church Records. Nauvoo 1846,” [1]; “Historian’s Office Catalogue 1858,” 2, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Historian’s Office. Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904. CHL.

These and later archival records, as well as archival marking on the volume, indicate continuous institutional custody.

Facts