26017

History, 1834–1836

prevailing spirit of the times; showing that priestcraft has it’s victims, also in this age, like those in ages past, that would not believe, though one should rise from the dead. This evening he attended a debate at his brother Wm. Smith

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

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’s; The question propounded was as follows.— Was it, or was it not, necessary for God to reveal himself to man to render them happy. He (Joseph) was on the affirmative, and the last one to speak on that side of the question: But while listning to the ingenious arguments of the contending parties, he & Eldr. Carrill John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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(who was his opponent in this debate) was called away to visit the sick, and neither of them had the opportunity of speaking on that occasion.350

With Corrill, JS again called on Angeline Works. According to the journal, they “went and prayed for and layed hands on her in the name of Jesus Christ, She appeard to be better.”  


13 December 1835 • Sunday

Sunday morning 13th. At the usual hour, viz. 10. oclock he attended meeting at the school-house on the flats

Also referred to as “little red schoolhouse.” First frame schoolhouse in township. Built on Kirtland “flats” (lowlands on northern side of community just southwest of Kirtland-Chardon Road), 1819. Served as school for community and location of youth Sunday...

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. Eldr. Jesse Hitchcock

10 Aug. 1801–ca. 1846. Born in Ashe Co., North Carolina. Son of Isaac Hitchcock and Elizabeth Wheeler. Married Mary Polly Hopper, 4 July 1821, at Lafayette Co., Missouri. Baptized into LDS church. Ordained an elder by Oliver Cowdery, 20 July 1831. Located...

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preached a very feeling discourse indeed; in the after noon Eldr. Peter Whitmer Jr.

27 Sept. 1809–22 Sept. 1836. Tailor. Born at Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, in Seneca Lake, Seneca Co. One of the Eight Witnesses of the Book of Mormon, June 1829. Among six...

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related his experiance, after which Pres. Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, related his also; they both spoke of many things connected with the rise and progress of this church of Christ, which were highly interesting and the saints listned with attention. After these servises closed, the sacrament of the Lord’s supper was administered, under the superintendance of Pres. David Whitmer

7 Jan. 1805–25 Jan. 1888. Farmer, livery keeper. Born near Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Raised Presbyterian. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, shortly after birth. Attended German Reformed Church. Arranged...

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, who presided over the meeting during the day. Pres. Joseph (our author) then made some remarks respecting prayer meetings, and our meeting was brought to a close by invoking heavens blessings upon the audiance.
He returned home and ordered his horses saddled and himself, & Scribe

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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rode to Mr. Jennings where he had been envited to solemnize the marriage contract, between Mr. Ebenezer Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

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, & Miss. Angeline Works

22 Aug. 1814–8 Apr. 1880. Schoolteacher. Born at Aurelius, Cayuga Co., New York. Daughter of Asa Works and Abigail Marks. Sister of Brigham Young’s first wife, Miriam Works Young. Baptized into LDS church, 1835, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Ebenezer...

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.351

The journal continues, “Miss Works had so far recoverd from her illness, that she was able to sit in her easy chair while I pronounced the mariage ceremony.”  


After these ceremonies were concluded we rode to Mr. Isaac Mc Withy

1778–4 May 1851. Farmer. Born in New York. Married Hannah Taylor of Vermont. Moved to Covington, Genesee Co., New York, by 1820. Lived at Bennington, Genesee Co., with family of five, 1830. Ordained an elder, 15 Feb. 1833. Lived at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio...

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’s the distance of about 3 miles from town, where he had been solicited to attend and join in marrage Mr. Edwin Webb

Ca. 1813–after 1902. Blacksmith, carpenter. Born at Hanover, Chautauque Co., New York. Son of James Webb and Hannah Griswold. Baptized into LDS church, likely 1834. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, before Dec. 1835. Married first Eliza Ann McWethy (McWithey...

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& Miss E A. Mc Withy Eliza Ann McWethy

1817–before 1860. Born in New York. Daughter of Isaac McWithy and Hannah Taylor. Married to Edwin Densmore Webb by JS, 13 Dec. 1835, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Moved to Rochester, Peoria Co., Illinois, by June 1840. Lived in Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois...

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: The parents and many of the connexions of both parties were present, with a large and respectable company of friends, who were invited as [p. 146]
prevailing spirit of the times; showing that priestcraf[t] has  it’s victims, also in this age, like those in ages past, that  would not believe, though one should rise from the  dead. This evening he attended a debate at his brother  Wm. Smith

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

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’s; The question propounded was as follows.—  Was it, or was it not, necessary for God to reveal himself  to man to render them happy. He (Joseph) was on the  affirmative, and the last one to speak on that side of  the question: But while listning [to] the ingenious arguments  of the contending parties, he & Eldr. Carrill [John Corrill]

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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(who was his  opponent in this debate) was called away to visit the  sick, and neither of them had the opportunity of speaking  on that occasion.350

With Corrill, JS again called on Angeline Works. According to the journal, they “went and prayed for and layed hands on her in the name of Jesus Christ, She appeard to be better.”  


13 December 1835 • Sunday

Sunday morning 13th. At the usual hour, viz. 10. oclock he atten ded meeting at the school-house on the flats

Also referred to as “little red schoolhouse.” First frame schoolhouse in township. Built on Kirtland “flats” (lowlands on northern side of community just southwest of Kirtland-Chardon Road), 1819. Served as school for community and location of youth Sunday...

More Info
. Eldr.  Jesse Hitchcock

10 Aug. 1801–ca. 1846. Born in Ashe Co., North Carolina. Son of Isaac Hitchcock and Elizabeth Wheeler. Married Mary Polly Hopper, 4 July 1821, at Lafayette Co., Missouri. Baptized into LDS church. Ordained an elder by Oliver Cowdery, 20 July 1831. Located...

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preached a very feeling discourse  indeed; in the after noon Eldr. Peter Whitmer [Jr.]

27 Sept. 1809–22 Sept. 1836. Tailor. Born at Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, in Seneca Lake, Seneca Co. One of the Eight Witnesses of the Book of Mormon, June 1829. Among six...

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 related his experiance, after which Pres. F[rederick] G. Willi ams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, related his also; they both spoke of many  things connected with the rise and progress of  this church of Christ, which were highly interesting  and the saints listned with attention. After these  servises closed, the sacrament of the Lord’s supper  was administered, under the superintendance  of Pres. David Whitmer

7 Jan. 1805–25 Jan. 1888. Farmer, livery keeper. Born near Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Raised Presbyterian. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, shortly after birth. Attended German Reformed Church. Arranged...

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, who presided over the meeting  during the day. Pres. Joseph (our author) then made  some remarks respecting prayer meetings, and  our meeting was brought to a close by invoking  heavens blessings upon the audiance.
He returned home and ordered his horses saddled  and himself, & Scribe

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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rode to br. Mr. Jennings where  he had been envited to solemnize the marriage  contract, between br. Mr. Ebenezer Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

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, & sister Miss.  Angeline Works

22 Aug. 1814–8 Apr. 1880. Schoolteacher. Born at Aurelius, Cayuga Co., New York. Daughter of Asa Works and Abigail Marks. Sister of Brigham Young’s first wife, Miriam Works Young. Baptized into LDS church, 1835, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Ebenezer...

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.351

The journal continues, “Miss Works had so far recoverd from her illness, that she was able to sit in her easy chair while I pronounced the mariage ceremony.”  


After these ceremonies were concluded  we rode to Mr. [Isaac] Mc Withy

1778–4 May 1851. Farmer. Born in New York. Married Hannah Taylor of Vermont. Moved to Covington, Genesee Co., New York, by 1820. Lived at Bennington, Genesee Co., with family of five, 1830. Ordained an elder, 15 Feb. 1833. Lived at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio...

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’s the distance of about 3 miles  from town, where he had been solicited to attend  and join in marrage Mr. E[dwin] Webb

Ca. 1813–after 1902. Blacksmith, carpenter. Born at Hanover, Chautauque Co., New York. Son of James Webb and Hannah Griswold. Baptized into LDS church, likely 1834. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, before Dec. 1835. Married first Eliza Ann McWethy (McWithey...

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& Miss E A. Mc  Withy [Eliza Ann McWethy]

1817–before 1860. Born in New York. Daughter of Isaac McWithy and Hannah Taylor. Married to Edwin Densmore Webb by JS, 13 Dec. 1835, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Moved to Rochester, Peoria Co., Illinois, by June 1840. Lived in Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois...

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: The parents and many of the connexions of  both parties were present, with a large and resp ectable company of friends, who were invited as [p. 146]
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JS, History, [Dec. 1834–May 1836?]; handwriting of Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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, Warren Cowdery

17 Oct. 1788–23 Feb. 1851. Physician, druggist, farmer, editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Married Patience Simonds, 22 Sept. 1814, in Pawlet, Rutland Co. Moved to Freedom, Cattaraugus Co., New York, 1816...

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, Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, and Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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; includes genealogical and financial tables; 154 pages; verso of JS History, 1838–1856, vol. A-1, CHL. Includes redactions, use marks, and archival marking.
Large blank book composed of ruled paper printed with forty horizontal lines in (now faint) blue ink. The text block includes thirty gatherings of various sizes, each about a dozen leaves per gathering, and originally had 384 interior leaves cut to measure 13⅝ x 9 inches (35 x 23 cm). The text block, which was conserved in the late twentieth century, was probably originally sewn on recessed cords and was apparently also glued on leather tapes. The binding features false bands. The endpapers were single-sided marbled leaves featuring a traditional Spanish pattern with slate blue body and black and red veins. The block was bound to pasteboard covers, probably with a hollow-back ledger binding, making a book measuring 14¼ x 9½ x 2½ inches (36 x 24 x 6 cm). The boards were bound in brown suede calfskin. At some point, blind-tooled decorations were made around the outside border and along the board edges and the turned-in edges of the inside covers.
Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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began the text of the document on the thirteenth page of the text block, numbering it as page 9. Cowdery set aside pages 9–16 for genealogical tables for the members of the church presidency. He inscribed the page numbers, table headings, and column and row ruling for the tables in red ink with a quill pen. The content of the tables was inscribed in ink that is now brown with a quill pen, as was the rest of the history. Cowdery inscribed journal-like entries for 5 and 6 December 1834 on pages 17–20. Pages 21–45 are blank except for page numbering. Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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and Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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copied Cowdery’s 1834–1835 historical articles, published serially in the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, onto pages 46–103. A passage that Parrish missed while copying the first installment of the Cowdery history is supplied on a slip of paper attached to page 50 with adhesive wafers. On pages 103–104, Parrish copied part of a JS letter, also published in the church newspaper. On pages 105–187, Parrish and Warren Cowdery

17 Oct. 1788–23 Feb. 1851. Physician, druggist, farmer, editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Married Patience Simonds, 22 Sept. 1814, in Pawlet, Rutland Co. Moved to Freedom, Cattaraugus Co., New York, 1816...

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wrote historical entries based on the entries in JS’s 1835–1836 journal. The genealogical table headings written by Oliver Cowdery, the letter headings and closings written by Williams and Parrish, and the datelines written by Parrish and Warren Cowdery are slightly larger than the ordinary script of these individuals. Parrish’s datelines also feature a vertical stress that contrasts with the oblique stress of his entry inscriptions. In their copying from the Messenger and Advocate, Frederick G. Williams and Warren Parrish often used a slightly larger script for words that appear in small caps in the printed version. Although pagination for the 1834–1836 history was inscribed up to page 241, the actual chronicle reaches only to page 187. Oliver Cowdery numbered pages 9–21, Frederick G. Williams numbered pages 22–58, Warren Parrish numbered pages 59–111, and Warren Cowdery numbered pages 112–241. Sometime later, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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inscribed year and month-and-year headings in black ink on pages 17–20, 46–47, 105–173, and 176–187. Various pages also bear redactions in unidentified handwriting in black and blue pencil.
In 1839, the book was repurposed for the inscription of a new history. The book was turned over so that the back cover became the front and the last leaf became the first. From this new front of the book, JS’s scribes began writing what became the first volume of JS’s multivolume manuscript history (the first 61 pages of which are transcribed as “Draft 2”). That later history filled most of the remaining leaves of the book, running well into the blank pages that were numbered for the 1834–1836 history and up to within five pages of the inscribed entries in the earlier history. However, only numbering on pages 235–241 of the 1834–1836 history were erased (by knife eraser). With the later history’s side of the book upward, the spine of the book was labeled as volume “A | 1” of the multivolume history. Archival stickers were also added at some point to the spine and the inside front cover. Two interior leaves are now missing from the initial gathering of the volume and one leaf is missing from the final gathering. The flyleaves and pastedowns were also lost or removed from the book.1

See JS History, vol. A-1, microfilm, Dec. 1971, CHL. Only one leaf of the original pastedowns and flyleaves is extant. The pastedowns were replaced with undecorated paper in 1994, according to a conservation note on the verso of the extant marbled leaf archived with the volume.  


The volume shows moderate wear, browning, water staining, and brittleness. It has been resewn, rebound, and otherwise conserved.
While the 1834–1836 history was being created, the volume was apparently kept in the homes of JS’s scribes.2

See JS, Journal, 29 Oct. 1835 and 25 Jan. 1836 (see also entry for 29 Oct. 1835 herein).  


In 1839, scribe James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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converted the book into the first volume of JS’s multivolume manuscript history.3

Jessee, “Writing of Joseph Smith’s History,” 439–441, 450–451, 464.  


In 1842, the church newspaper in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, began publishing this later history.4

The serialized publication of this history began in the 15 March 1842 issue of the Times and Seasons.  


JS maintained custody of the volume through his later life, as indicated by a note he inscribed memorializing his deceased brother Alvin Smith

11 Feb. 1798–19 Nov. 1823. Farmer, carpenter. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; returned to Tunbridge, before May 1803. Moved to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804, and to...

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, which was attached to the verso of the flyleaf preceding the later history. The volume is listed in the first extant Historian’s Office inventory, made in Nauvoo in February 1846 by clerk Thomas Bullock, and it is listed in inventories of church records made in Salt Lake City in the second half of the nineteenth century.5

“Schedule of Church Records. Nauvoo 1846,” [1]; “Historian’s Office Catalogue 1858,” 2, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


These and later archival records, as well as archival marking on the volume, indicate continuous institutional custody.

Facts