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History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

he was ordained <an> elder. As will be seen by the foregoing revela tions, he went up to Missouri as a companion of Elder [Isaac] Morley;  but when he actually learned that faith, humility, patience and  tribulation, were before blessing; and that God brought low  before <he> exalted; that instead of “the Savior’s granting him power  to smite men and make them believe”, (as he said he wanted God  to do him,) he found he must become all things to all men, that  he might peradventure save some, and that too, by all dil igence, by perils by sea and land. As was the case in the  days of Jesus, which appears in the 6th chapter of St. John’s gospel,  he said, verily, verily I say unto you, ye seek me, not because  ye saw the miracles, but because ye did eat of the loaves, and  were filled; so was it <with> Booth, and when he was disappointed by  his own evil heart, he turned away, and as said before  became an apostate, and wrote a series of Letters which  by their coloring, falsity, and vain calculations to overthrow  the work of the Lord, exposed his weakness, wickedness and  folly, and left him a monument of his own for shame for the  world to wonder at.
A conference was held in which brother W[illiam] W. Phelps was instruc ted to stop at Cincinnati, on his way to Missouri, and purchase  a press and types, for the purpose of establishing and publishing  a monthly paper at Independence, Jackson county, Missouri,  to be called “The Evening and Morning Star.” The first Sunday  in October Orson Hyde, a clerk in Brothers Sidney Gilbert and  Newel K. Whitney’s store, <in Kirtland,> was baptised, and became a member  of the church. As he was soon after designated as one of the  chosen men of the Lord to bear his word to the nations, I feel a  desire to notice him as he was and as he is. He was <in his own words> left in  his infancy an orphan, with none to look upon him with a  father’s eye, and feel for him with a mother’s heart. The hand  that wiped my his infant tears was still; the breasts that gave  his him suck, was cold, and slumbered in the arms of death. He  was thrust abroad upon the cold and friendless bosom of an  unfeeling world, so that for twenty long years, he saw no one  in whose veins flowed a drop of kindred blood, and conse quently grew up as a wild and uncultivated plant of nature,  and now had come into the new and everlasting cov enant to be renewed and receive grace for grace, [p. 154]
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JS, History, 1838–1856, vol. A-1, created 11 June 1839–24 Aug. 1843; handwriting of James Mulholland, Robert B. Thompson, William W. Phelps, and Willard Richards; 553 pages, plus 16 pages of addenda; CHL. This is the first volume of a six-volume manuscript history of the church. This first volume covers the period from 23 December 1805 to 30 August 1834; the remaining five volumes, labeled B-1 through F-1, continue through 8 August 1844.

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