43990549

History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

which I spoke in my turn as accuser, and stated that I called June 16 Council. on the accused, in company with Presedent Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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, for money to send up to Zion, but could get none. Afterwards saw him, and asked if he would sell his farm. He at first seemed willing, and wished to build up Zion. He plead excuse in consequence of his liberality to the poor. We offered him three thousand dollars for his farm, would give him four and five hundred dollars to take him to Zion, and settle him there, and obligation for the remainder with good security and interest. He went and told Father Lyon that we demanded all his property, and so we lost four of five hundred dollars because the accused told him such a story, he calculated to keep it himself. The accused, Elder McWithy

1778–4 May 1851. Farmer. Born in New York. Married Hannah Taylor of Vermont. Moved to Covington, Genesee Co., New York, by 1820. Lived at Bennington, Genesee Co., with family of five, 1830. Ordained an elder, 15 Feb. 1833. Lived at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio...

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, arose and said it was the first time he had been called upon to clear himself before a High council. He complained of being called contrary to the rules of the gospel before the council. The president decided that as the case was now before the council, it could not now be urged but should have been made in the beginning. He plead that he had relieved the wants of the poor, and did so many good things that he was astonished that he should hear such things as he had heard to day, because he did not give all he had got to one man. If he had done wrong he asked forgiveness, of God and the church.

3 June 1836 • Friday

Licences Recorded. During the Quarter ending the 3d of June 1836, Two hundred and forty four Elder’s, Eleven Priest’s, three Teacher's and five Deacon’s Licences were recorded in the Licence Records in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio.

29 June 1836 • Wednesday

Addenda p 4 Note M minutes of a public meeting at Liberty Missouri
29 Minutes of a Public Meeting at Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Mo. On the 29th. a respectable number of the citizens met, being previously notified of the same, at the Court house, in the town of Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Mo. On motion, John Bird was called to the chair, and John F. Doherty appointed Secretary. The object of the meeting was by request of the chair, explained in a few appropriate remarks, by Col William Wood

25 Mar. 1809–11 May 1902. Lawyer. Born in Gordon Station (likely near present-day Harrodsburg), Mercer Co., Kentucky. Son of William Wood and Sallie Thomas. Mason. Moved to Columbia, Boone Co., Missouri, 1829. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Appointed...

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; when, on Committee, appointed. motion of Col Wm. T. Wood

25 Mar. 1809–11 May 1902. Lawyer. Born in Gordon Station (likely near present-day Harrodsburg), Mercer Co., Kentucky. Son of William Wood and Sallie Thomas. Mason. Moved to Columbia, Boone Co., Missouri, 1829. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Appointed...

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. a committee of nine was appointed to draft resolutions expressive of the sense of this meeting: whereupon the following gentlemen were chosen, namely; John Thornton, Esq; Peter Rogers. Esqr, Andrew Robertson, Esq. James T. V. Thompson, Esq. Col. William T. Wood

25 Mar. 1809–11 May 1902. Lawyer. Born in Gordon Station (likely near present-day Harrodsburg), Mercer Co., Kentucky. Son of William Wood and Sallie Thomas. Mason. Moved to Columbia, Boone Co., Missouri, 1829. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Appointed...

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, Doct Woodson J Moss, James M. Hughes, Esq, David R. Atchison

11 Aug. 1807–26 Jan. 1886. Lawyer, judge, agriculturist, politician, farmer. Born at Frogtown, near Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of William Atchison and Catherine Allen. About 1830, moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Missouri, where he became a prominent...

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, Esq, and Alexander W. Doniphan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

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, Esq; Who retired, and in a short time returned and made through their Chairman, (Col John Thornton,) the following unanimous report which was read.
x Report of Committee It is apparent, to every reflecting mind, that a crisis has arrived in this county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, that requires the deep, cool, dispassionate consideration, and immediate action of every lover of peace, harmony and good order. We cannot conceal from ourselves, the fact that, at this moment, the clouds of civil war are roling up their fearful masses, and hanging [p. 735]
which I spoke in my turn as accuser, and stated that I called  <June 16  Council.> on the accused, in company with Presedent O[liver] Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
, for  money to send up to Zion, but could get none. Afterwards saw  him, and asked if he would sell his farm. He at first  seemed willing, and wished to build up Zion. He plead excuse  in consequence of his liberality to the poor. We offered him three  thousand dollars for his farm, would give him four and five  hundred dollars to take him to Zion, and settle him there, and  obligation for the remainder with good security and interest.  He went and told Father Lyon that we demanded all his  property, and so we lost four of five hundred dollars because  the accused told him such a story, he calculated to keep it  himself. The accused, Elder McWithy

1778–4 May 1851. Farmer. Born in New York. Married Hannah Taylor of Vermont. Moved to Covington, Genesee Co., New York, by 1820. Lived at Bennington, Genesee Co., with family of five, 1830. Ordained an elder, 15 Feb. 1833. Lived at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio...

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, arose and said it was  the first time he had been called upon to clear himself  before a High council. He complained of being called con trary to the rules of the gospel before the council. The  president decided that as the case was now before the  council, it could not now be urged but should have  been made in the beginning. He plead that he had  relieved the wants of the poor, and did so many good  things that he was astonished that he should hear such  things as he had heard to day, because he did not give all  he had got to one man. If he had done wrong he asked  forgiveness, of God and the church.

3 June 1836 • Friday

<Licences Recorded.> During the Quarter ending the 3d of June 1836, Two hundred and  forty four Elder’s, Eleven Priest’s, three Teacher's and five Deacon’s  Licences were recorded in the Licence Records in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio.

29 June 1836 • Wednesday

<Addenda p 3 4 <Note M> minutes of a public meeting at Liberty Missouri>
<29 <Minutes of a>  Public Meeting  at Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Mo.> On the 29th. a respectable number of the citizens met, being  previously notified of the same, at the Court house, in  the town of Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Mo. On motion, John Bird was called  to the chair, and John F. Doherty appointed Secretary. The  object of the meeting was by request of the chair, explained  in a few appropriate remarks, by Col [William] Wood

25 Mar. 1809–11 May 1902. Lawyer. Born in Gordon Station (likely near present-day Harrodsburg), Mercer Co., Kentucky. Son of William Wood and Sallie Thomas. Mason. Moved to Columbia, Boone Co., Missouri, 1829. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Appointed...

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; when, on  <Committee,  appointed.> motion of Col Wm. T. Wood

25 Mar. 1809–11 May 1902. Lawyer. Born in Gordon Station (likely near present-day Harrodsburg), Mercer Co., Kentucky. Son of William Wood and Sallie Thomas. Mason. Moved to Columbia, Boone Co., Missouri, 1829. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Appointed...

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. a committee of nine was app ointed to draft resolutions expressive of the sense of this  meeting: whereupon the following gentlemen were chosen,  namely; John Thornton, Esq; Peter Rogers. Esqr, Andrew Robert son, Esq. James T. V. Thompson, Esq. Col. William T. Wood

25 Mar. 1809–11 May 1902. Lawyer. Born in Gordon Station (likely near present-day Harrodsburg), Mercer Co., Kentucky. Son of William Wood and Sallie Thomas. Mason. Moved to Columbia, Boone Co., Missouri, 1829. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Appointed...

View Full Bio
, Doct Wood son J Moss, James M. Hughes, Esq, David R. Atchison

11 Aug. 1807–26 Jan. 1886. Lawyer, judge, agriculturist, politician, farmer. Born at Frogtown, near Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of William Atchison and Catherine Allen. About 1830, moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Missouri, where he became a prominent...

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, Esq, and  A[lexander] W. Doniphan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

View Full Bio
, Esq; Who retired, and in a short time returned  and made through their Chairman, (Col John Thornton,)  the following unanimous report which was read.
<x  Report of Committee> It is apparent, to every reflecting mind, that a crisis has  arrived in this county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, that requires the deep, cool, dispas sionate consideration, and immediate action of every lover  of peace, harmony and good order. We cannot conceal  from ourselves, the fact that, at this moment, the clouds of  civil war are roling up their fearful masses, and hanging [p. 735]
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This document, volume B-1, is the second of the six volumes of the “Manuscript History of the Church.” The collection was compiled over the span of seventeen years, 1838 to 1856. The narrative in volume B-1 begins with the entry for 1 September 1834, just after the conclusion of the Camp of Israel (later called Zion’s Camp), and continues to 2 November 1838, when JS was interned as a prisoner of war at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri. For a fuller discussion of the entire six-volume work, see the general introduction to the history.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, serving as JS’s “private secretary and historian,” completed the account of JS’s history contained in volume A-1 in August 1843. It covered the period from JS’s birth in 1805 through the aftermath of the Camp of Israel in August 1834. When work resumed on the history on 1 October 1843, Richards started a new volume, eventually designated B-1.
At the time of JS’s death in June 1844, the account had been advanced to 5 August 1838, on page 812 of volume B-1. Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s poor health led to the curtailment of work on B-1 for several months, until 11 December 1844. On that date, Richards and William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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, assisted by Thomas Bullock, resumed gathering the records and reports needed to draft the history. Richards then composed and drafted roughed-out notes while Thomas Bullock compiled the text of the history and inscribed it in B-1. They completed their work on the volume on or about 24 February 1845. Richards, Willmer Benson, and Jonathan Grimshaw later added ten pages of “Addenda,” which provided notes, extensive revisions, or additional text to be inserted in the original manuscript where indicated.
Though JS did not dictate or revise any of the text recorded in B-1, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Thomas Bullock chose to maintain the first-person, chronological narrative format established in A-1 as if JS were the author. They drew from a variety of primary and secondary sources including JS’s diaries and letters, minutes of meetings, the first edition of the Doctrine and Covenants, church and other periodicals, reports of JS’s discourses, and the reminiscences and recollections of church members. As was the case with A-1, after JS’s death, Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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, George A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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, and others modified and corrected the manuscript as they reviewed material before its eventual publication.
Beginning in March 1842 the church’s Nauvoo periodical, the Times and Seasons, began publishing the narrative as the “History of Joseph Smith.” It was also published in England in the church periodical the Millennial Star beginning in June 1842. Once a press was established in Utah and the Deseret News began publication, the “History of Joseph Smith” once more appeared in print in serialized form. Beginning with the November 1851 issue, the narrative picked up where the Times and Seasons had left off over five years earlier.
The narrative recorded in B-1 continued the story of JS’s life as the prophet and president of the church he labored to establish. The account encompasses significant developments in the church’s two centers at that time—Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, and northwest Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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—during a four-year-span. Critical events included the organization of the Quorums of the Twelve Apostles and the Seventy, the dedication of the House of the Lord in Kirtland, Ohio, the establishment of the Kirtland Safety Society, dissension and apostasy in Kirtland and Missouri, the first mission to England, JS’s flight from Kirtland to Missouri in the winter of 1838, the Saints’ exodus from Kirtland later that year, the disciplining of the Missouri presidency, and the outbreak of the Missouri War and arrest of JS. Thus, B-1 provides substantial detail regarding a significant period of church expansion and transition as well as travail.

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