43990549

History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

June 29 Resolutions 4th. That said committee consist of Andrew Robertson, Michael Arthur

19 May 1800–8 Aug. 1884. Farmer. Born in Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Married Amanda M. F. Martin, 24 May 1822, in Jessamine Co., Kentucky. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Befriended and employed many Latter-day Saints after they were expelled ...

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, Littleberry Sublet, John Baxter, Jas. M. Hughes, W. J. Moss, John Bird, Peter Rogers, W. T. Wood

25 Mar. 1809–11 May 1902. Lawyer. Born in Gordon Station (likely near present-day Harrodsburg), Mercer Co., Kentucky. Son of William Wood and Sallie Thomas. Mason. Moved to Columbia, Boone Co., Missouri, 1829. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Appointed...

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, and J. T. V. Thompson, who shall meet on the morrow at the house of Mr Cowen, and confer with the Mormons, and report to this meeting as soon thereafter as convenient, the reply of the Mormons to these requisitions.
5th. That if the Mormons agree to these propositions, we will use every means in our power to allay the excitement among our own citizens, and to get them to await the result of these things.
6th. That it is the opinion of this meeting that the recent emigrants among the Mormons, should take measures to leave this county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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immediately, as they have no crops on hand and nothing to lose by continuing their journey to some more friendly land. On Motion of Wm. T. Wood

25 Mar. 1809–11 May 1902. Lawyer. Born in Gordon Station (likely near present-day Harrodsburg), Mercer Co., Kentucky. Son of William Wood and Sallie Thomas. Mason. Moved to Columbia, Boone Co., Missouri, 1829. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Appointed...

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, the preamble and Resolutions were unanimously adopted. Be it Resolved that this meeting adjourn until Saturday next. John Bird, Chair. John F. Doherty, Secy

28 June 1836 • Tuesday

28 W. Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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’s Letter. On the day previous, June 28th Elder Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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wrote from Hickman County, Tennessee, stating that many citizens of the county of Benton, and some of Carroll, had met in convention, headed by a Methodist Priest, who was called to the chair, and the county clerk appointed Secretary. They drew up resolutions to drive all the “Mormon” preachers from their coast, signed by the Sheriff and many who were sworn to be civil peace officers, also Colonels, Majors, &c.
“We enjoyed our meeting unmolested at Bro Seth utley’s on saturday the 19th. instant. Hundreds had entered into the conspiracy. In the afternoon a little before sunset, a company of some forty or fifty men made their appearance, some on foot others mounted, two on a horse, with guns, sticks, clubs, &c. They were led by a sheriff, Col, first, and second Major, other officers, and David W. Patten

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

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, W. Woodruff,

1 Mar. 1807–2 Sept. 1898. Farmer, miller. Born at Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Aphek Woodruff and Beulah Thompson. Moved to Richland, Oswego Co., New York, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Zera Pulsipher, 31 Dec. 1833, near Richland. Ordained...

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& W. Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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, Mobbed in Tennessee a Methodist priest, with a gun on his shoulder. The Sheriff informed us that he had a states Warrant for David W. Patten

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

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, Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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, and Wilford Woodruff

1 Mar. 1807–2 Sept. 1898. Farmer, miller. Born at Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Aphek Woodruff and Beulah Thompson. Moved to Richland, Oswego Co., New York, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Zera Pulsipher, 31 Dec. 1833, near Richland. Ordained...

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, issued on complaint of the Methodist priest, Matthew Williams, chairman as above, who swore that we had put forth the following false and pretended prophecy, viz: That Christ would come the second time before this generation passed away, also that four individuals should receive the Holy Ghost within four and twenty hours. The company consisted, as we were informed, of Baptists, Methodists, Presbyterians, liars, drunkards, hog and horse theives. So determined were they to force us off at that late hour, that it was with much difficulty we could prevail on them to shew us any lenity: however they protracted the time of our appearance at court until tuesday by giving our bond, with surety of two brethren. in the sum of one thousand dollars. They intended to have led us into the woods under the dark curtain of night, with the pretension of taking us before the magistrate, that they might the better execute their diabolical designs upon us. On Tuesday, in company with about twenty brethren and warm friends who were ready and [p. 739]
<June 29  Resolutions> 4th. That said committee consist of Andrew Robertson, Michael   Arthur

19 May 1800–8 Aug. 1884. Farmer. Born in Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Married Amanda M. F. Martin, 24 May 1822, in Jessamine Co., Kentucky. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Befriended and employed many Latter-day Saints after they were expelled ...

View Full Bio
, Littleberry Sublet, John Baxter, Jas. M. Hughes, W. J. Moss,  John Bird, Peter Rogers, W. T. Wood

25 Mar. 1809–11 May 1902. Lawyer. Born in Gordon Station (likely near present-day Harrodsburg), Mercer Co., Kentucky. Son of William Wood and Sallie Thomas. Mason. Moved to Columbia, Boone Co., Missouri, 1829. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Appointed...

View Full Bio
, and J. T. V. Thompson, who  shall meet on the morrow at the house of Mr Cowen, and confer  with the Mormons, and report to this meeting as soon thereafter  as convenient, the reply of the Mormons to these requisitions.
5th. That if the Mormons agree to these propositions, we will use  every means in our power to allay the excitement among our  own citizens, and to get them to await the result of these things.
6th. That it is the opinion of this meeting that the recent emigrants  among the Mormons, should take measures to leave this county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
 immediately, as they have no crops on hand and nothing  to lose by continuing their journey to some more friendly land.  On Motion of Wm. T. Wood

25 Mar. 1809–11 May 1902. Lawyer. Born in Gordon Station (likely near present-day Harrodsburg), Mercer Co., Kentucky. Son of William Wood and Sallie Thomas. Mason. Moved to Columbia, Boone Co., Missouri, 1829. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1830. Appointed...

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, the preamble and Resolutions were  unanimously adopted. Be it Resolved that this meeting  adjourn until Saturday next. John Bird, Chair. John F. Doherty, Secy

28 June 1836 • Tuesday

<28  W. Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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’s Letter.> On the day previous, June 28th Elder Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

View Full Bio
wrote from  Hickman County, Tennessee, stating that many citizens of the county  of Benton, and some of Carroll, had met in convention, headed  by a Methodist Priest, who was called to the chair, and the county  clerk appointed Secretary. They drew up resolutions to drive all  the “Mormon” preachers from their coast, signed by the Sheriff and  many who were sworn to be civil peace officers, also Colonels, Majors,  &c.
“We enjoyed our meeting unmolested at Bro [Seth] utley’s on saturday  the 19th. instants. Hundreds had entered into the conspiracy. In  the afternoon a little before sunset, a company of some forty  or fifty men made their appearance, some on foot others  mounted, two on a horse, with guns, sticks, clubs, &c. They were  led by a sheriff, Col, first, and second Major, other officers, and  <David W. Patten

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

View Full Bio
,  W. Woodruff,

1 Mar. 1807–2 Sept. 1898. Farmer, miller. Born at Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Aphek Woodruff and Beulah Thompson. Moved to Richland, Oswego Co., New York, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Zera Pulsipher, 31 Dec. 1833, near Richland. Ordained...

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&  W. Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

View Full Bio
,  Mobbed in  Tennessee> a Methodist priest, with a gun on his shoulder. The Sheriff in formed us that he had a states Warrant for David W. Patten

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

View Full Bio
, Warren  Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

View Full Bio
, and Wilford Woodruff

1 Mar. 1807–2 Sept. 1898. Farmer, miller. Born at Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Aphek Woodruff and Beulah Thompson. Moved to Richland, Oswego Co., New York, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Zera Pulsipher, 31 Dec. 1833, near Richland. Ordained...

View Full Bio
, issued on complaint of the Meth odist priest, Matthew Williams, chairman as above, who swore  that we had put forth the following false and pretended  prophecy, viz: That Christ would come the second time before  this generation passed away, also that four individuals should  receive the Holy Ghost within four and twenty hours. The company  consisted, as we were informed, of Baptists, Methodists, Presby terians, liars, drunkards, hog and horse theives. So determined  were they to force us off at that late hour, that it was with much  difficulty we could prevail on them to shew us any lenity:  however they protracted the time of our appearance at court until  tuesday by giving our bond, with surety of two brethren. in the  sum of one thousand dollars. Then They intended to have led us into  the woods under the dark curtain of night, with the pretension  of taking us before the magistrate, that they might the better execute  their diabolical designs upon us. On Tuesday, in company with  about twenty brethren and warm friends who were ready and [p. 739]
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This document, volume B-1, is the second of the six volumes of the “Manuscript History of the Church.” The collection was compiled over the span of seventeen years, 1838 to 1856. The narrative in volume B-1 begins with the entry for 1 September 1834, just after the conclusion of the Camp of Israel (later called Zion’s Camp), and continues to 2 November 1838, when JS was interned as a prisoner of war at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri. For a fuller discussion of the entire six-volume work, see the general introduction to the history.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, serving as JS’s “private secretary and historian,” completed the account of JS’s history contained in volume A-1 in August 1843. It covered the period from JS’s birth in 1805 through the aftermath of the Camp of Israel in August 1834. When work resumed on the history on 1 October 1843, Richards started a new volume, eventually designated B-1.
At the time of JS’s death in June 1844, the account had been advanced to 5 August 1838, on page 812 of volume B-1. Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s poor health led to the curtailment of work on B-1 for several months, until 11 December 1844. On that date, Richards and William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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, assisted by Thomas Bullock, resumed gathering the records and reports needed to draft the history. Richards then composed and drafted roughed-out notes while Thomas Bullock compiled the text of the history and inscribed it in B-1. They completed their work on the volume on or about 24 February 1845. Richards, Willmer Benson, and Jonathan Grimshaw later added ten pages of “Addenda,” which provided notes, extensive revisions, or additional text to be inserted in the original manuscript where indicated.
Though JS did not dictate or revise any of the text recorded in B-1, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Thomas Bullock chose to maintain the first-person, chronological narrative format established in A-1 as if JS were the author. They drew from a variety of primary and secondary sources including JS’s diaries and letters, minutes of meetings, the first edition of the Doctrine and Covenants, church and other periodicals, reports of JS’s discourses, and the reminiscences and recollections of church members. As was the case with A-1, after JS’s death, Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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, George A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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, and others modified and corrected the manuscript as they reviewed material before its eventual publication.
Beginning in March 1842 the church’s Nauvoo periodical, the Times and Seasons, began publishing the narrative as the “History of Joseph Smith.” It was also published in England in the church periodical the Millennial Star beginning in June 1842. Once a press was established in Utah and the Deseret News began publication, the “History of Joseph Smith” once more appeared in print in serialized form. Beginning with the November 1851 issue, the narrative picked up where the Times and Seasons had left off over five years earlier.
The narrative recorded in B-1 continued the story of JS’s life as the prophet and president of the church he labored to establish. The account encompasses significant developments in the church’s two centers at that time—Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, and northwest Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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—during a four-year-span. Critical events included the organization of the Quorums of the Twelve Apostles and the Seventy, the dedication of the House of the Lord in Kirtland, Ohio, the establishment of the Kirtland Safety Society, dissension and apostasy in Kirtland and Missouri, the first mission to England, JS’s flight from Kirtland to Missouri in the winter of 1838, the Saints’ exodus from Kirtland later that year, the disciplining of the Missouri presidency, and the outbreak of the Missouri War and arrest of JS. Thus, B-1 provides substantial detail regarding a significant period of church expansion and transition as well as travail.

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