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History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

about “Jo” Smith; while one honest looking Dutchman said he wished he was ready to go along with them.

14 July 1838 • Saturday

July 14 Saturday 14th The camp moved to Miflin— 10 miles. This was the first day since leaving Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, that they did not break one or more waggons. Nathan B. Baldwin preferred a charge against Abraham Bond for murmuring and other unchristianlike conduct. After hearing both parties the council referred them to the company of their own tent for settlement.

15 July 1838 • Sunday

Sunday 15. Sunday, 15th. The camp was engaged in preaching the first principles of the gospel, and many came to listen.

16 July 1838 • Monday

16 Monday 16 travelled 16 miles and encamped at Springfield. Three or four miles east of Mansfield

Town laid out, 1808. Established as county seat of justice, 1813. Incorporated 1828. Population in 1830 about 800. Population by 1839 about 2,000. Campsite for Camp of Israel, 10–11 May 1834. Kirtland Camp also passed through town en route to Missouri, 16...

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the camp was met by the county, Sheriff his deputy, and Mr Stringer, who had taken out a warrant for several of the brethren for “Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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Butterfield

13 Mar. 1795–3 Mar. 1871. Farmer, stockman. Born at Dunstable, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Abel Butterfield and Mercy Farnsworth. Married first Polly Moulton, 30 Oct. 1819. Moved to Buxton, York Co., Maine, 1820. Baptized into LDS church by John ...

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, Dunham

14 Jan. 1800–28 July 1845. Soldier, police captain. Born in Paris, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Jonathan Dunham. Married Mary Kendall. Moved to Rushford, Allegany Co., New York, by 1830. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, by 1836. Served mission...

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, & Hale imprisoned Safety Society” money, and took Josiah Butterfield

13 Mar. 1795–3 Mar. 1871. Farmer, stockman. Born at Dunstable, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Abel Butterfield and Mercy Farnsworth. Married first Polly Moulton, 30 Oct. 1819. Moved to Buxton, York Co., Maine, 1820. Baptized into LDS church by John ...

View Full Bio
, Jonathan Dunham

14 Jan. 1800–28 July 1845. Soldier, police captain. Born in Paris, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Jonathan Dunham. Married Mary Kendall. Moved to Rushford, Allegany Co., New York, by 1830. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, by 1836. Served mission...

View Full Bio
, and Jonathan H. Hale for Joseph Young

7 Apr. 1797–16 July 1881. Farmer, painter, glazier. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Moved to Auburn, Cayuga Co., New York, before 1830. Joined Methodist church, before Apr. 1832. Baptized into LDS...

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, and committed them to jail. Many threats were reported that the camp should not pass Mansfield

Town laid out, 1808. Established as county seat of justice, 1813. Incorporated 1828. Population in 1830 about 800. Population by 1839 about 2,000. Campsite for Camp of Israel, 10–11 May 1834. Kirtland Camp also passed through town en route to Missouri, 16...

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, but they were disturbed only by the repeated discharge of cannon, to frighten their horses as they passed the Court House.

17 July 1838 • Tuesday

17 Tuesday 17. the camp travelled 16 miles and pitched their tents on the prairie in whetstone township, at 7. P.M.— The court was in session at Mansfield

Town laid out, 1808. Established as county seat of justice, 1813. Incorporated 1828. Population in 1830 about 800. Population by 1839 about 2,000. Campsite for Camp of Israel, 10–11 May 1834. Kirtland Camp also passed through town en route to Missouri, 16...

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, and the case of the imprisoned brethren was called up at 8. this morning but no bill was found and they were discharged, at 4 minutes past one P.M.— and joined the camp at 7. having travelled 22 miles. While in prison they prayed, & sung, and rejoiced that they were counted worthy to suffer for Christs sake, and in the night a light equal to noon day burst into the prison; Elder Jonathan Dunham

14 Jan. 1800–28 July 1845. Soldier, police captain. Born in Paris, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Jonathan Dunham. Married Mary Kendall. Moved to Rushford, Allegany Co., New York, by 1830. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, by 1836. Served mission...

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took out his watch and saw that it was 3 minutes past one, and he received a testimony that they would be liberated the same hour, that afternoon. which proved thus true

18 July 1838 • Wednesday

18 Wednesday morning 18th. The council appointed Dominicus Carter commissary of the camp. At 1, P.M. the camp halted, to refresh, on the edge of the prairie, the first privileges they had enjoyed without paying for it, and encamped in the town of Grand Prairie, 16 miles.— .

19 July 1838 • Thursday

19 Thursday 19. Travelled 7½ miles and encamped on a prairie, in a line, for the first time; In their travels this day they fell in with a Lamanite, of the Wyandot tribe. Elder Parker gave him the stick of Joseph, which pleased him much. When he saw the camp moving he exclaimed “Dis serprize me mazingly.”

20 July 1838 • Friday

20. Friday morning 20th the council— reproved some of the camp for their covetousness. and complaining,— and were told they must leave off all such evil practices and banish such feelings or they would be scattered to the four winds. Encamped this night on the highway, about 1 mile from Burlington

Located in southeastern Iowa on west bank of Mississippi River. Site selected for construction of fort, 1805. Area settled, ca. 1833, by Europeans. Laid out, 1834. Incorporated 1837. Designated capital of Wisconsin Territory, 1837; capital of Iowa Territory...

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.— 9½ miles travel. The company was thoroughly wet by a heavy shower this night.

21 July 1838 • Saturday

21 Saturday 21. roads very muddy, & bad, broke. Some disputings, and not half food enough for dinner,— and some were hungry enough to eat raw corn before they could procure supper. Travelled 16 miles and encamped by the road side 7 miles from the sciota river. [p. 805]
about “Jo” Smith; while one honest looking Dutchman said he wished he was  ready to go along with them.

14 July 1838 • Saturday

<July 14> Saturday 14th The camp moved to Miflin— 10  miles. This was the first day since leaving Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, that they did not break  one or more waggons. N[athan] B. Baldwin preferred a complaint charge against  Abraham Bond for murmuring and other unchristianlike conduct.  After hearing both parties the council referred them to the company of their  own tent for settlement.

15 July 1838 • Sunday

<Sunday 15.> Sunday, 15th. The camp was engaged in preach ing the first principles of the gospel, and many came to listen.

16 July 1838 • Monday

<16> Monday 16  travelled 16 miles and encamped at Springfield. Three or four miles east of  Madison <Mansfield

Town laid out, 1808. Established as county seat of justice, 1813. Incorporated 1828. Population in 1830 about 800. Population by 1839 about 2,000. Campsite for Camp of Israel, 10–11 May 1834. Kirtland Camp also passed through town en route to Missouri, 16...

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> the camp was met by the county, <Sheriff> his deputy, and Mr Stringer,  who had taken out a warrant for several of the brethren for “Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
 <Butterfield

13 Mar. 1795–3 Mar. 1871. Farmer, stockman. Born at Dunstable, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Abel Butterfield and Mercy Farnsworth. Married first Polly Moulton, 30 Oct. 1819. Moved to Buxton, York Co., Maine, 1820. Baptized into LDS church by John ...

View Full Bio
, Dunham

14 Jan. 1800–28 July 1845. Soldier, police captain. Born in Paris, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Jonathan Dunham. Married Mary Kendall. Moved to Rushford, Allegany Co., New York, by 1830. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, by 1836. Served mission...

View Full Bio
,  & Hale imprisoned> Safety Society” money, and took Josiah Butterfield

13 Mar. 1795–3 Mar. 1871. Farmer, stockman. Born at Dunstable, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Abel Butterfield and Mercy Farnsworth. Married first Polly Moulton, 30 Oct. 1819. Moved to Buxton, York Co., Maine, 1820. Baptized into LDS church by John ...

View Full Bio
, Jonathan Dunham

14 Jan. 1800–28 July 1845. Soldier, police captain. Born in Paris, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Jonathan Dunham. Married Mary Kendall. Moved to Rushford, Allegany Co., New York, by 1830. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, by 1836. Served mission...

View Full Bio
,  and Jonathan H. Hale for Joseph Young

7 Apr. 1797–16 July 1881. Farmer, painter, glazier. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Moved to Auburn, Cayuga Co., New York, before 1830. Joined Methodist church, before Apr. 1832. Baptized into LDS...

View Full Bio
, and committed them to  jail. Many threats were reported that the camp should not pass  Mansfield

Town laid out, 1808. Established as county seat of justice, 1813. Incorporated 1828. Population in 1830 about 800. Population by 1839 about 2,000. Campsite for Camp of Israel, 10–11 May 1834. Kirtland Camp also passed through town en route to Missouri, 16...

More Info
, but they were disturbed only by the repeated discharge  of cannon, to frighten their horses as they passed the Court House.

17 July 1838 • Tuesday

<17> Tuesday 17. the camp travelled 16 miles and pitched their tents on the  prairie on in whetstone township, at 7. P.M.— The court was in session  at Mansfield

Town laid out, 1808. Established as county seat of justice, 1813. Incorporated 1828. Population in 1830 about 800. Population by 1839 about 2,000. Campsite for Camp of Israel, 10–11 May 1834. Kirtland Camp also passed through town en route to Missouri, 16...

More Info
, and the case of the imprisoned brethren was called  up at 8. this morning but no bill was found and they were dis charged, at 4 minutes past one P.M.— and joined the camp at 7. hav ing travelled 22 miles. While in prison they prayed, & sung, and  rejoiced that they were counted worthy to suffer for Christs sake,  and in the night a light equal to noon day burst into the  prison; Elder [Jonathan] Dunham

14 Jan. 1800–28 July 1845. Soldier, police captain. Born in Paris, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Jonathan Dunham. Married Mary Kendall. Moved to Rushford, Allegany Co., New York, by 1830. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, by 1836. Served mission...

View Full Bio
took out his watch and saw that it was  3 minutes past one, and he received a testimony that they would  be liberated the same hour, that afternoon. <which proved thus true>

18 July 1838 • Wednesday

<18> Wednesday morning  18th. The council gave instruction to the overseers of tents and appoin ted Dominicus Carter commissary of the camp. At 1, P.M. the camp  halted, to refresh, on the edge of the prairie, the first privileges they had  enjoyed without paying for it, and encamped in the town of Grand  Prairie, 16 miles.— .

19 July 1838 • Thursday

<19> Thursday 19. Travelled 7½ miles and encamp ed on a prairie, in a line, for the first time; In their travels this  day they fell in with a Lamanite, of the Wyandot tribe. Elder  Parker gave him the stick of Joseph, which pleased him much.  When he saw the camp moving he exclaimed “Dis serprize me  mazingly.”

20 July 1838 • Friday

<20.> Friday morning 20th Another complaint was preferred  against Abram Bond for faul[t]finding &c, and he was severely  repreimanded by the council— others also were reproved <some of the camp> for their cov etousness. and complaining,— and were told they must leave it off  all such evil practices and banish such feelings or they would  be scattered to the four winds. Encamped this night by on the high way, about 1 mile from Burlington

Located in southeastern Iowa on west bank of Mississippi River. Site selected for construction of fort, 1805. Area settled, ca. 1833, by Europeans. Laid out, 1834. Incorporated 1837. Designated capital of Wisconsin Territory, 1837; capital of Iowa Territory...

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.— 9½ miles travel. The company  was thoroughly wet by a heavy shower this night.

21 July 1838 • Saturday

<21> Saturday 21. roads  very muddy, & bad, one axletree broke. Some disputings, and not  half food enough for dinner,— and some were hungry enough to  eat raw corn before they could procure supper. Travelled 16 miles  and encamped by the road side 7 miles from the sciota river. [p. 805]
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This document, volume B-1, is the second of the six volumes of the “Manuscript History of the Church.” The collection was compiled over the span of seventeen years, 1838 to 1856. The narrative in volume B-1 begins with the entry for 1 September 1834, just after the conclusion of the Camp of Israel (later called Zion’s Camp), and continues to 2 November 1838, when JS was interned as a prisoner of war at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri. For a fuller discussion of the entire six-volume work, see the general introduction to the history.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, serving as JS’s “private secretary and historian,” completed the account of JS’s history contained in volume A-1 in August 1843. It covered the period from JS’s birth in 1805 through the aftermath of the Camp of Israel in August 1834. When work resumed on the history on 1 October 1843, Richards started a new volume, eventually designated B-1.
At the time of JS’s death in June 1844, the account had been advanced to 5 August 1838, on page 812 of volume B-1. Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s poor health led to the curtailment of work on B-1 for several months, until 11 December 1844. On that date, Richards and William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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, assisted by Thomas Bullock, resumed gathering the records and reports needed to draft the history. Richards then composed and drafted roughed-out notes while Thomas Bullock compiled the text of the history and inscribed it in B-1. They completed their work on the volume on or about 24 February 1845. Richards, Willmer Benson, and Jonathan Grimshaw later added ten pages of “Addenda,” which provided notes, extensive revisions, or additional text to be inserted in the original manuscript where indicated.
Though JS did not dictate or revise any of the text recorded in B-1, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Thomas Bullock chose to maintain the first-person, chronological narrative format established in A-1 as if JS were the author. They drew from a variety of primary and secondary sources including JS’s diaries and letters, minutes of meetings, the first edition of the Doctrine and Covenants, church and other periodicals, reports of JS’s discourses, and the reminiscences and recollections of church members. As was the case with A-1, after JS’s death, Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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, George A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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, and others modified and corrected the manuscript as they reviewed material before its eventual publication.
Beginning in March 1842 the church’s Nauvoo periodical, the Times and Seasons, began publishing the narrative as the “History of Joseph Smith.” It was also published in England in the church periodical the Millennial Star beginning in June 1842. Once a press was established in Utah and the Deseret News began publication, the “History of Joseph Smith” once more appeared in print in serialized form. Beginning with the November 1851 issue, the narrative picked up where the Times and Seasons had left off over five years earlier.
The narrative recorded in B-1 continued the story of JS’s life as the prophet and president of the church he labored to establish. The account encompasses significant developments in the church’s two centers at that time—Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, and northwest Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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—during a four-year-span. Critical events included the organization of the Quorums of the Twelve Apostles and the Seventy, the dedication of the House of the Lord in Kirtland, Ohio, the establishment of the Kirtland Safety Society, dissension and apostasy in Kirtland and Missouri, the first mission to England, JS’s flight from Kirtland to Missouri in the winter of 1838, the Saints’ exodus from Kirtland later that year, the disciplining of the Missouri presidency, and the outbreak of the Missouri War and arrest of JS. Thus, B-1 provides substantial detail regarding a significant period of church expansion and transition as well as travail.

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