43990549

History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

x Lord has appointed for your safety.” David W. Patten

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

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.” See B. page 807.

6 August 1838 • Monday, continued

(C.) refer back to 807 page
August. 6. In the afternoon the citizens of Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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assembled in the School house

Likely log building; located in southwest quarter of town in public square. Also functioned as LDS church meetinghouse, town hall, and courthouse. First quarterly conference held in schoolhouse, Apr. 1838. During conference, Thomas B. Marsh, David W. Patten...

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and organized the meeting by calling Judge Elias Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

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to the chair and appointing George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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Secretary, I stated to the meeting that the time had come when it was necessary that we Weekly Newspaper should have a Weekly Newspaper to unite the people, by giving the News of the day &c when it was unanimously agreed that such a Paper be established and that President Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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Petition for Removal of the County Seat to Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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. should be the Editor. It was also voted that a Petition be circulated to locate the County Seat to Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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. I addressed the meeting on the propriety of the measure and also on the duty Living in cities of the brethren to come into Cities to build and live and carry on their farms out of the Cities according to the order of God— President Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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and Brother Hyrum [Smith]

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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spoke upon the same subject— Some two weeks previous to this Judge [Josiah] Morin

8 Jan. 1791–25/26 Oct. 1885. Farmer, merchant, judge. Born at Bourbon Co., Virginia (later in Kentucky). Son of John Morin and Sarah Fishback. Served in War of 1812. Married first Mary Shipp, 4 July 1815, in Kentucky. Wife died. Married second Harriet Barnet...

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who lived at Mill Port informed Mob John D. Lee and Levi Stewart, that it was determined by the mob to prevent the Mormons Election at Gallatin

Founded and laid out, 1837. Unofficial county seat, beginning 1837. Officially named county seat, 1841. Several Latter-day Saints attempted to vote at Gallatin, 6 Aug. 1838, but were attacked by local residents. After Mormon-Missouri conflict erupted, Saints...

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from voting at the Election on the sixth day of August and thereby elect Colonel William— P. Peniston

Ca. 1811–10 Nov. 1850. Sheriff, military colonel, clerk, hotelier. Born at Jessamine Co., Kentucky. Son of Robert Peniston and Nancy Nuttle. Moved to Ray Co., Missouri, ca. 1831. A founder of Millport, in what became Daviess Co., Missouri, where family built...

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who led the mob in Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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. He also advised them to go prepared for an attack to stand their ground and have their rights— The brethren hoping better things gave little heed to Judge Morin

8 Jan. 1791–25/26 Oct. 1885. Farmer, merchant, judge. Born at Bourbon Co., Virginia (later in Kentucky). Son of John Morin and Sarah Fishback. Served in War of 1812. Married first Mary Shipp, 4 July 1815, in Kentucky. Wife died. Married second Harriet Barnet...

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’s friendly Counsel, and repaired to the Polls at Gallatin

Founded and laid out, 1837. Unofficial county seat, beginning 1837. Officially named county seat, 1841. Several Latter-day Saints attempted to vote at Gallatin, 6 Aug. 1838, but were attacked by local residents. After Mormon-Missouri conflict erupted, Saints...

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, the shire town of Daviess County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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without weapons. About Eleven o’clock A.M. William P. Peniston

Ca. 1811–10 Nov. 1850. Sheriff, military colonel, clerk, hotelier. Born at Jessamine Co., Kentucky. Son of Robert Peniston and Nancy Nuttle. Moved to Ray Co., Missouri, ca. 1831. A founder of Millport, in what became Daviess Co., Missouri, where family built...

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ascended the head of a barrel and harangued the Electors for the purpose of exciting them against the Mormons, saying that the Mormon Leaders were “a set of horse thieves, Liars, Counterfeiters” &c and you “know they profess to heal the sick, cast out devils &c and you all know that is a damned lie,” that the Members of the Church were dupes, and not too good to take a false oath on any common occasion; that they would steal and did not conceive property safe where they were; that he was opposed to their settling there; and if they suffered the Mormons to vote, the people would soon loose their suffrage; and said he addressing the Saints “I headed a mob to drive you out of Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, and would not prevent your being mobbed now;” when Richard (called Dick) Welding, the mob bully, just drunk enough for the occasion, began a discussion with Brother Samuel Brown by saying the mormons were not allowed to vote in Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, no more than the damned negroes, and attempted to strike Brown who gradually retreated, parrying the blow with his Umbrella, while Welding continued to press upon him, calling him a damned liar &c. and while attempting to repeat the blow on Brown, Perry Durfee attempted to suppress the difficulty by holding Dick’s arm, when five or six of the Mobbers seized Durfee and commenced beating him with Clubs, Boards &c and crying “kill him, kill him, God dam him, kill him,” when a general scuffle commenced with fists and clubs, the mobbers being about ten to one of the Saints, Abraham Nelson was knocked down, and had his clothes torn off, and while trying to get up was attacked again, when his brother Hiram Nelson

12 Nov. 1797–27 July 1862. Stockman. Born at Orange Co., North Carolina. Son of Thomas Burton Nelson and Martha Williams. Married Mary (Polly) B. Roundtree, 4 July 1825, in Illinois. Baptized into LDS church by 1838, when he moved to Daviess Co., Missouri...

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ran in amongst them and knocked the Mobbers down with the Butt of his Whip— Riley Stewart struck Dick Welding on the head, which brought him to the ground. The mob cried out “Dick Weldin’s dead by God. Who killed Dick?” and fell upon Riley, knocked him down, kicked him, and hollered ”kill him, God dam him, kill him, shoot him by God” and would have killed him, had not John L. Butler

8 Apr. 1808–10 Apr. 1860. Schoolteacher, farmer, cooper, blacksmith. Born at Warren Co. (later Simpson Co.), Kentucky. Son of James Butler and Charity Lowe. Member of Methodist church, then Baptist church. Married Caroline Farzine Skeen, 3 Feb. 1831, at Sumner...

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sprung in amongst them and knocked them down— During about five minutes it was one continued knock down, when the Mob dispersed to get fire arms. Very few of the Brethren voted. Riley succeeded in escaping across the River, had his wounds dressed and returned home. Butler

8 Apr. 1808–10 Apr. 1860. Schoolteacher, farmer, cooper, blacksmith. Born at Warren Co. (later Simpson Co.), Kentucky. Son of James Butler and Charity Lowe. Member of Methodist church, then Baptist church. Married Caroline Farzine Skeen, 3 Feb. 1831, at Sumner...

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called the Brethren together and made a speech saying “We are American Citizens; our Fathers fought for their liberty, and we will maintain the same principles &c.— when the authorities of the County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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came to them, and requested them to withdraw, stating that it was a premeditated thing to prevent the Mormons voting. The Brethren held a Council about one fourth of a mile out of town, where they saw Mobbing recruits coming in, in small parties from five and ten to twenty five in number armed with [p. 812]
<x> Lord has appointed for your safety.” David W. Patten

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

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.” See B. page 807.

6 August 1838 • Monday, continued

(C.) <refer back to 807 page>
<August. 6.>

Willard Richards handwriting ends; Thomas Bullock begins.  


In the afternoon the citizens of Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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assembled in the School house

Likely log building; located in southwest quarter of town in public square. Also functioned as LDS church meetinghouse, town hall, and courthouse. First quarterly conference held in schoolhouse, Apr. 1838. During conference, Thomas B. Marsh, David W. Patten...

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and organized  the meeting by calling Judge Elias Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

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to the chair and appointing George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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 Secretary, I stated to the meeting that the time had come when it was necessary that we  <Weekly Newspaper> should have a Weekly Newspaper to unite the people, by giving the News of the day &c when it  was unanimously agreed that such a Paper be established and that President Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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 <Petition for Removal  of the County Seat to  Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
.> should be the Editor. It was also voted that a Petition be circulated to remove <locate> the County  Seat to Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
. I addressed the meeting on the propriety of the measure and also on the duty  <Living in cities> of the brethren to come into Cities to build and live and carry on their farms out of the Cities  according to the order of God— President Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
and Brother Hyrum [Smith]

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
spoke upon the same  subject— Some two weeks previous to this Judge [Josiah] Morin

8 Jan. 1791–25/26 Oct. 1885. Farmer, merchant, judge. Born at Bourbon Co., Virginia (later in Kentucky). Son of John Morin and Sarah Fishback. Served in War of 1812. Married first Mary Shipp, 4 July 1815, in Kentucky. Wife died. Married second Harriet Barnet...

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who lived at Mill Port informed  <Mob> John D. Lee and Levi Stewart, that it was determined by the mob to prevent the Mormons  <Election at Gallatin

Founded and laid out, 1837. Unofficial county seat, beginning 1837. Officially named county seat, 1841. Several Latter-day Saints attempted to vote at Gallatin, 6 Aug. 1838, but were attacked by local residents. After Mormon-Missouri conflict erupted, Saints...

More Info
> from voting at the Election on the sixth day of August and thereby elect Colonel William—  P. Peniston

Ca. 1811–10 Nov. 1850. Sheriff, military colonel, clerk, hotelier. Born at Jessamine Co., Kentucky. Son of Robert Peniston and Nancy Nuttle. Moved to Ray Co., Missouri, ca. 1831. A founder of Millport, in what became Daviess Co., Missouri, where family built...

View Full Bio
who led the mob in Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
. He also advised them to go prepared for an attack  to stand their ground and have their rights— The brethren hoping better things gave little heed to  Judge Morin

8 Jan. 1791–25/26 Oct. 1885. Farmer, merchant, judge. Born at Bourbon Co., Virginia (later in Kentucky). Son of John Morin and Sarah Fishback. Served in War of 1812. Married first Mary Shipp, 4 July 1815, in Kentucky. Wife died. Married second Harriet Barnet...

View Full Bio
’s friendly Counsel, and repaired to the Polls at Gallatin

Founded and laid out, 1837. Unofficial county seat, beginning 1837. Officially named county seat, 1841. Several Latter-day Saints attempted to vote at Gallatin, 6 Aug. 1838, but were attacked by local residents. After Mormon-Missouri conflict erupted, Saints...

More Info
, the shire town of Davies[s] County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
 without weapons. About Eleven o’clock A.M. William P. Peniston

Ca. 1811–10 Nov. 1850. Sheriff, military colonel, clerk, hotelier. Born at Jessamine Co., Kentucky. Son of Robert Peniston and Nancy Nuttle. Moved to Ray Co., Missouri, ca. 1831. A founder of Millport, in what became Daviess Co., Missouri, where family built...

View Full Bio
ascended the head of a  barrel and harangued the Electors for the purpose of exciting them against the Mormons,  saying that the Mormon Leaders were “a set of horse thieves, Liars, Counterfeiters” &c and you  “know they profess to heal the sick, cast out devils &c and you all know that is a damned lie,”  that the Members of the Church were dupes, and not too good to take a false oath on any  common occasion; that they would steal and did not conceive property safe where they were;  that he was opposed to their settling there; and if they suffered the Mormons to vote, the people  would soon loose their suffrage; and said he addressing the Saints “I headed a mob to drive  you out of Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
, and would not prevent your being mobbed now;” when Richard  (called Dick) Welding, the mob bully, just drunk enough for the occasion, began a discussion  with Brother Samuel Brown by saying the mormons were not allowed to vote in Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
,  no more than the damned negroes, and attempted to strike Brown who gradually retreated,  parrying the blow with his Umbrella, while Welding continued to press upon him, calling him  a damned liar &c. and while attempting to repeat the blow on Brown, Perry Durfee attempted  to suppress the difficulty by holding Dick’s arm, when five or six of the Mobbers seized Durfee and  commenced beating him with Clubs, Boards &c and crying “kill him, kill him, God dam him, kill him,”  when a general scuffle commenced with fists and clubs, the mobbers being about ten to one of the Saints,  Abraham Nelson was knocked down, and had his clothes torn off, and while trying to get up was  attacked again, when his brother Hiram Nelson

12 Nov. 1797–27 July 1862. Stockman. Born at Orange Co., North Carolina. Son of Thomas Burton Nelson and Martha Williams. Married Mary (Polly) B. Roundtree, 4 July 1825, in Illinois. Baptized into LDS church by 1838, when he moved to Daviess Co., Missouri...

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ran in amongst them and knocked the Mobbers  down with the Butt of his Whip— Riley Stewart struck Dick Welding on the head, which brought  him to the ground. The mob cried out “Dick Weldin’s dead by God. Who killed Dick?” and  fell upon Riley, knocked him down, kicked him, and hollered ”kill him, God dam him, kill him,  shoot him by God” and would have killed him, had not John L. Butler

8 Apr. 1808–10 Apr. 1860. Schoolteacher, farmer, cooper, blacksmith. Born at Warren Co. (later Simpson Co.), Kentucky. Son of James Butler and Charity Lowe. Member of Methodist church, then Baptist church. Married Caroline Farzine Skeen, 3 Feb. 1831, at Sumner...

View Full Bio
sprung in amongst them  and knocked them down— During about five minutes it was one continued knock down, when the  Mob dispersed to get fire arms. Very few of the Brethren voted. Riley succeeded in escaping across  the River, had his wounds dressed and returned home. Butler

8 Apr. 1808–10 Apr. 1860. Schoolteacher, farmer, cooper, blacksmith. Born at Warren Co. (later Simpson Co.), Kentucky. Son of James Butler and Charity Lowe. Member of Methodist church, then Baptist church. Married Caroline Farzine Skeen, 3 Feb. 1831, at Sumner...

View Full Bio
called the Brethren together and  made a speech saying “We are American Citizens; our Fathers fought for their liberty, and we will  maintain the same principles &c.— when the authorities of the County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
came to them, and  requested them to withdraw, stating that it was a premeditated thing to prevent the Mormons voting.  The Brethren held a Council about one fourth of a mile out of town, where they saw Mobbing  recruits coming in, in small parties from five and ten to twenty five in number armed with [p. 812]
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This document, volume B-1, is the second of the six volumes of the “Manuscript History of the Church.” The collection was compiled over the span of seventeen years, 1838 to 1856. The narrative in volume B-1 begins with the entry for 1 September 1834, just after the conclusion of the Camp of Israel (later called Zion’s Camp), and continues to 2 November 1838, when JS was interned as a prisoner of war at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri. For a fuller discussion of the entire six-volume work, see the general introduction to the history.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, serving as JS’s “private secretary and historian,” completed the account of JS’s history contained in volume A-1 in August 1843. It covered the period from JS’s birth in 1805 through the aftermath of the Camp of Israel in August 1834. When work resumed on the history on 1 October 1843, Richards started a new volume, eventually designated B-1.
At the time of JS’s death in June 1844, the account had been advanced to 5 August 1838, on page 812 of volume B-1. Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s poor health led to the curtailment of work on B-1 for several months, until 11 December 1844. On that date, Richards and William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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, assisted by Thomas Bullock, resumed gathering the records and reports needed to draft the history. Richards then composed and drafted roughed-out notes while Thomas Bullock compiled the text of the history and inscribed it in B-1. They completed their work on the volume on or about 24 February 1845. Richards, Willmer Benson, and Jonathan Grimshaw later added ten pages of “Addenda,” which provided notes, extensive revisions, or additional text to be inserted in the original manuscript where indicated.
Though JS did not dictate or revise any of the text recorded in B-1, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Thomas Bullock chose to maintain the first-person, chronological narrative format established in A-1 as if JS were the author. They drew from a variety of primary and secondary sources including JS’s diaries and letters, minutes of meetings, the first edition of the Doctrine and Covenants, church and other periodicals, reports of JS’s discourses, and the reminiscences and recollections of church members. As was the case with A-1, after JS’s death, Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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, George A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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, and others modified and corrected the manuscript as they reviewed material before its eventual publication.
Beginning in March 1842 the church’s Nauvoo periodical, the Times and Seasons, began publishing the narrative as the “History of Joseph Smith.” It was also published in England in the church periodical the Millennial Star beginning in June 1842. Once a press was established in Utah and the Deseret News began publication, the “History of Joseph Smith” once more appeared in print in serialized form. Beginning with the November 1851 issue, the narrative picked up where the Times and Seasons had left off over five years earlier.
The narrative recorded in B-1 continued the story of JS’s life as the prophet and president of the church he labored to establish. The account encompasses significant developments in the church’s two centers at that time—Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, and northwest Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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—during a four-year-span. Critical events included the organization of the Quorums of the Twelve Apostles and the Seventy, the dedication of the House of the Lord in Kirtland, Ohio, the establishment of the Kirtland Safety Society, dissension and apostasy in Kirtland and Missouri, the first mission to England, JS’s flight from Kirtland to Missouri in the winter of 1838, the Saints’ exodus from Kirtland later that year, the disciplining of the Missouri presidency, and the outbreak of the Missouri War and arrest of JS. Thus, B-1 provides substantial detail regarding a significant period of church expansion and transition as well as travail.

Facts