43990549

History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

October 10th. but instead of receiving any aid or even sympathy, from his Excellency, we were told that “the quarrel was between the Mormons and the Mob,” and that “we might fight it out” About this time a mob commanded by Hiram Standly took Smith Humphrey

1 Nov. 1805–1 Mar. 1874. Farmer. Born in Rhode Island. Married Eliza Proctor. Lived in York, Upper Canada, by 1831. Baptized into LDS church. Moved to De Witt, Carroll Co., Missouri, by 1838; to Caldwell Co., Missouri, 1838; and to Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois...

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’s goods out of his house, Mob at De Witt

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

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and said Standly set fire to Humphrey

1 Nov. 1805–1 Mar. 1874. Farmer. Born in Rhode Island. Married Eliza Proctor. Lived in York, Upper Canada, by 1831. Baptized into LDS church. Moved to De Witt, Carroll Co., Missouri, by 1838; to Caldwell Co., Missouri, 1838; and to Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois...

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’s house and burned it before his eyes. and ordered him to leave the place forthwith, which he did by fleeing from De Witt

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

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to Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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. The mob had sent to Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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and got a cannon, powder and balls, and bodies of armed men had gathered in to aid them from Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

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, Saline, Howard, Livingston

Organized 1837. Population in 1840 about 4,300. Hawn’s Mill Massacre planned by mob in eastern part of county.

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, Clinton, Clay

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, Platt and other parts of the State, and a man by the name of Jackson from Howard County was appointed their leader— The Saints were forbid to go out of the Town under pain of death, and were shot at when they attempted to go out to get food of— which they were destitute. As fast as their Cattle, horses or other property got where the Mob could get hold of it, it was taken as spoil. By these outrages the brethren were obliged, most of them to live in waggons or tents, application had been made to the judge of the circuit court for protection, who ordered out two companies of Militia one commanded by Captain Samuel Bogart

2 Apr. 1797–11 Mar. 1861. Preacher, military officer, farmer. Born in Carter Co., Tennessee. Son of Cornelius Bogart and Elizabeth Moffett. Served in War of 1812. Married Rachel Hammer, 19 May 1818, in Washington Co., Tennessee. Moved to Illinois and became...

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, a Methodist priest and Mobocrat of the deepest die, the whole under the command of General Hiram Parks

Ca. 1807–after 1880. Farmer, military officer, sheriff, real estate agent, hatter. Born in Tennessee. Married first Nancy McGhee, 22 Apr. 1828, in Knox Co., Tennessee. Resided in Knoxville, Knox Co., 1830. Moved to Richmond, Ray Co., Missouri, by 1835. Ray...

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, another Mobber, if his letters speak his feelings. and his actions did not belie him, for he never made the first attempt to disperse the Mob, and when asked the reason of his conduct, he always replied that Bogart

2 Apr. 1797–11 Mar. 1861. Preacher, military officer, farmer. Born in Carter Co., Tennessee. Son of Cornelius Bogart and Elizabeth Moffett. Served in War of 1812. Married Rachel Hammer, 19 May 1818, in Washington Co., Tennessee. Moved to Illinois and became...

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and his Company were mutinous and mobocratic, that he dare not attempt a dispersion of the Mob. Two other principal men of the mob were Major Ashby Member of the Legislature and Cerceil (Sashiel) Sashel Woods

Ca. 1801–26 Apr. 1854. Preacher, trader. Born in Kentucky. Married Elizabeth Warren, 4 May 1824, in Howard Co., Missouri. Became Cumberland Presbyterian priest. Moved to Dorenda Creek, Carroll Co., Missouri, by June 1840. Conveyed merchandise from St. Louis...

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a Presbyterian Clergyman. General Parks

Ca. 1807–after 1880. Farmer, military officer, sheriff, real estate agent, hatter. Born in Tennessee. Married first Nancy McGhee, 22 Apr. 1828, in Knox Co., Tennessee. Resided in Knoxville, Knox Co., 1830. Moved to Richmond, Ray Co., Missouri, by 1835. Ray...

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informed us that a greater part of his men under Captain Bogart

2 Apr. 1797–11 Mar. 1861. Preacher, military officer, farmer. Born in Carter Co., Tennessee. Son of Cornelius Bogart and Elizabeth Moffett. Served in War of 1812. Married Rachel Hammer, 19 May 1818, in Washington Co., Tennessee. Moved to Illinois and became...

View Full Bio
had mutinied, and that he should be obliged to draw them off from the place, for fear they would join the Mob: consequently he could offer us no assistance. We had now no hopes whatever, of successfully resisting the Mob, who kept constantly increasing: our provisions were entirely exhausted and we being wearied out, by continually standing on guard, and watching the movements of our enemies; who during the time I was there, fired at us a great many times. Some of the brethren died for the common necessaries of life, and perished from starvation; and for once in my life, I had the pain of beholding some of my fellow creatures fall victims to the Spirit of persecution, which did then, and has since prevailed to such an extent in Upper Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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— men too, who were virtuous, and against whom, no legal process, could for one moment, be sustained; but who, in consequence of their love to God— attachment to his cause— and their determination to keep the faith, were thus brought to an untimely grave— In the mean time Henry Root

14 June 1813–9 Apr. 1895. Auctioneer, merchant, banker. Born at Clinton, Upper Canada. Son of Henry Ruth and Marie Overholt. Purchased interest in town of De Witt (first called Eldersport), Carroll Co., Missouri, 1837. Sold lots to Latter-day Saints. Moved...

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and David Thomas

12 May 1797–25 Apr. 1845. Born at Flat Rock District, Bourbon Co., Kentucky. Son of Richard Thomas and Elizabeth Bowles. Married Martha Parker, 17 Mar. 1816. Migrated to Carrollton, Carroll Co., Missouri, 1833. With Henry Root, landowner at De Witt, Carroll...

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, who had been the sole cause of the Settlement being made, solicited the Saints to leave the place. Thomas said he had assurances from the Mob that if they would leave the place they would not be hurt; and that they would be paid for all losses which they had sustained, and that they had come as mediators to accomplish this object; and that persons should be appointed to set value on the property which they had to leave, and that they should be paid for it. They finally, through necessity, had to comply and leave the place. Accordingly the committee was appointed— Judge Erickson was one of the Committee, and Major Flory, of Rutsville another— the names of x the others not recollected. They appraised the Real Estate, that was all. When the people came to start, their horses, oxen and cows were gone, many of them, and could not be found— it was known at the time, and the Mob boasted of it, that they had killed the oxen and lived on them. A great number of Cows Oxen and Horses have never been seen since, which doubtless the mob took and kept— and that was all the brethren ever received of the promised pay for all their losses at De Witt

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

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— Many houses belonging to my brethren were burned, their cattle driven away, and a [p. 835]
<October 10th.> but instead of receiving any aid or even sympathy, from his Excellency, we were told that  “the quarrel was between the Mormons and the Mob,” and that “we might fight it out” About this  time a mob commanded by Hiram Standly took Smith Humphr[e]y

1 Nov. 1805–1 Mar. 1874. Farmer. Born in Rhode Island. Married Eliza Proctor. Lived in York, Upper Canada, by 1831. Baptized into LDS church. Moved to De Witt, Carroll Co., Missouri, by 1838; to Caldwell Co., Missouri, 1838; and to Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois...

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’s goods out of his house,  <Mob at De Witt

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

More Info
> and said Standly set fire to Humphrey

1 Nov. 1805–1 Mar. 1874. Farmer. Born in Rhode Island. Married Eliza Proctor. Lived in York, Upper Canada, by 1831. Baptized into LDS church. Moved to De Witt, Carroll Co., Missouri, by 1838; to Caldwell Co., Missouri, 1838; and to Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois...

View Full Bio
’s house and burned it before his eyes. and ordered  him to leave <the place> forthwith, which he did by fleeing from De Witt

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

More Info
to Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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. The mob  had sent to Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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and got a cannon, powder and balls, and bodies of armed men  had gathered in to aid them from Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

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, Saline, Howard, Livingston

Organized 1837. Population in 1840 about 4,300. Hawn’s Mill Massacre planned by mob in eastern part of county.

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, Clinton, Clay

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, Platt and  other parts of the State, and a man by the name of Jackson from Howard County  was appointed their leader— The Saints were forbid to go out of the City <Town> under  pain of death, and were shot at when they attempted to go out to get food of—  which they were destitute. As fast as their Cattle, horses or other property got where  the Mob could get hold of it, it was taken as spoil. By these outrages the brethren  were obliged, most of them to live in waggons or tents, application had been made  to the judge of the circuit court for protection, who ordered out two companies of  Militia one commanded by Captain [Samuel] Bogart

2 Apr. 1797–11 Mar. 1861. Preacher, military officer, farmer. Born in Carter Co., Tennessee. Son of Cornelius Bogart and Elizabeth Moffett. Served in War of 1812. Married Rachel Hammer, 19 May 1818, in Washington Co., Tennessee. Moved to Illinois and became...

View Full Bio
, a Methodist priest and Mobocrat of  the deepest die, the whole under the command of General [Hiram] Parks

Ca. 1807–after 1880. Farmer, military officer, sheriff, real estate agent, hatter. Born in Tennessee. Married first Nancy McGhee, 22 Apr. 1828, in Knox Co., Tennessee. Resided in Knoxville, Knox Co., 1830. Moved to Richmond, Ray Co., Missouri, by 1835. Ray...

View Full Bio
, another Mobber,  if his letters speak his feelings. and his actions did not belie him, for he never  made the first attempt to disperse the Mob, and when asked the reason of  his conduct, he always replied that Bogart

2 Apr. 1797–11 Mar. 1861. Preacher, military officer, farmer. Born in Carter Co., Tennessee. Son of Cornelius Bogart and Elizabeth Moffett. Served in War of 1812. Married Rachel Hammer, 19 May 1818, in Washington Co., Tennessee. Moved to Illinois and became...

View Full Bio
and his Company were mutinous  and mobocratic, that he dare not attempt a dispersion of the Mob. Two other  principal men of the mob were Major Ashby Member of the Legislature and Cerceil  (Sashiel) [Sashel] Woods

Ca. 1801–26 Apr. 1854. Preacher, trader. Born in Kentucky. Married Elizabeth Warren, 4 May 1824, in Howard Co., Missouri. Became Cumberland Presbyterian priest. Moved to Dorenda Creek, Carroll Co., Missouri, by June 1840. Conveyed merchandise from St. Louis...

View Full Bio
a Presbyterian Clergyman. General Parks

Ca. 1807–after 1880. Farmer, military officer, sheriff, real estate agent, hatter. Born in Tennessee. Married first Nancy McGhee, 22 Apr. 1828, in Knox Co., Tennessee. Resided in Knoxville, Knox Co., 1830. Moved to Richmond, Ray Co., Missouri, by 1835. Ray...

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informed us that a greater  part of his men under Captain Bogart

2 Apr. 1797–11 Mar. 1861. Preacher, military officer, farmer. Born in Carter Co., Tennessee. Son of Cornelius Bogart and Elizabeth Moffett. Served in War of 1812. Married Rachel Hammer, 19 May 1818, in Washington Co., Tennessee. Moved to Illinois and became...

View Full Bio
had mutinied, and that he should be obliged  to draw them off from the place, for fear they would join the Mob: consequently he  could offer us no assistance. We had now no hopes whatever, of successfully resisting  the Mob, who kept constantly increasing: our provisions were entirely exhausted and  we being wearied out, by continually standing on guard, and watching the movements  of our enemies; who during the time I was there, fired at us a great many times.  Some of the brethren died for the common necessaries of life, and perished from  starvation; and for once in my life, I had the pain of beholding some of my fellow  creatures fall victims to the Spirit of persecution, which did then, and has since prevailed  to such an extent in Upper Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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— men too, who were virtuous, and against whom,  no legal process, could for one moment, be sustained; but who, in consequence of  their love to God— attachment to his cause— and their determination to keep the  faith, were thus brought to an untimely grave— In the mean time Henry Root

14 June 1813–9 Apr. 1895. Auctioneer, merchant, banker. Born at Clinton, Upper Canada. Son of Henry Ruth and Marie Overholt. Purchased interest in town of De Witt (first called Eldersport), Carroll Co., Missouri, 1837. Sold lots to Latter-day Saints. Moved...

View Full Bio
and  David Thomas

12 May 1797–25 Apr. 1845. Born at Flat Rock District, Bourbon Co., Kentucky. Son of Richard Thomas and Elizabeth Bowles. Married Martha Parker, 17 Mar. 1816. Migrated to Carrollton, Carroll Co., Missouri, 1833. With Henry Root, landowner at De Witt, Carroll...

View Full Bio
, who had been the sole cause of the Settlement being made, solicited the  Saints to leave the place. Thomas said he had assurances from the Mob that if  they would leave the place they would not be hurt; and that they would be paid for all  losses which they had sustained, and that they had come as mediators to accomplish  this object; and that persons should be appointed to set value on the property which  they had to leave, and that they should be paid for it. They finally, through necessity,  had to comply and leave the place. Accordingly the committee was appointed— Judge  Erickson was one of the Committee, and Major Flory, of Rutsville another— the names of  <x> the others not recollected. They appraised the Real Estate, that was all. When the  people came to start, their horses, oxen and cows were gone, many of them, and could  not be found— it was known at the time, and the Mob boasted of it, that they had  killed the oxen and lived on them. A great number of Cows Oxen and Horses  have never been seen since, which doubtless the mob took and kept— and that was  all the brethren ever received of the promised pay for all their losses at De Witt

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

More Info
 Many houses belonging to my brethren were burned, their cattle driven away, and a [p. 835]
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This document, volume B-1, is the second of the six volumes of the “Manuscript History of the Church.” The collection was compiled over the span of seventeen years, 1838 to 1856. The narrative in volume B-1 begins with the entry for 1 September 1834, just after the conclusion of the Camp of Israel (later called Zion’s Camp), and continues to 2 November 1838, when JS was interned as a prisoner of war at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri. For a fuller discussion of the entire six-volume work, see the general introduction to the history.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, serving as JS’s “private secretary and historian,” completed the account of JS’s history contained in volume A-1 in August 1843. It covered the period from JS’s birth in 1805 through the aftermath of the Camp of Israel in August 1834. When work resumed on the history on 1 October 1843, Richards started a new volume, eventually designated B-1.
At the time of JS’s death in June 1844, the account had been advanced to 5 August 1838, on page 812 of volume B-1. Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s poor health led to the curtailment of work on B-1 for several months, until 11 December 1844. On that date, Richards and William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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, assisted by Thomas Bullock, resumed gathering the records and reports needed to draft the history. Richards then composed and drafted roughed-out notes while Thomas Bullock compiled the text of the history and inscribed it in B-1. They completed their work on the volume on or about 24 February 1845. Richards, Willmer Benson, and Jonathan Grimshaw later added ten pages of “Addenda,” which provided notes, extensive revisions, or additional text to be inserted in the original manuscript where indicated.
Though JS did not dictate or revise any of the text recorded in B-1, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Thomas Bullock chose to maintain the first-person, chronological narrative format established in A-1 as if JS were the author. They drew from a variety of primary and secondary sources including JS’s diaries and letters, minutes of meetings, the first edition of the Doctrine and Covenants, church and other periodicals, reports of JS’s discourses, and the reminiscences and recollections of church members. As was the case with A-1, after JS’s death, Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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, George A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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, and others modified and corrected the manuscript as they reviewed material before its eventual publication.
Beginning in March 1842 the church’s Nauvoo periodical, the Times and Seasons, began publishing the narrative as the “History of Joseph Smith.” It was also published in England in the church periodical the Millennial Star beginning in June 1842. Once a press was established in Utah and the Deseret News began publication, the “History of Joseph Smith” once more appeared in print in serialized form. Beginning with the November 1851 issue, the narrative picked up where the Times and Seasons had left off over five years earlier.
The narrative recorded in B-1 continued the story of JS’s life as the prophet and president of the church he labored to establish. The account encompasses significant developments in the church’s two centers at that time—Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, and northwest Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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—during a four-year-span. Critical events included the organization of the Quorums of the Twelve Apostles and the Seventy, the dedication of the House of the Lord in Kirtland, Ohio, the establishment of the Kirtland Safety Society, dissension and apostasy in Kirtland and Missouri, the first mission to England, JS’s flight from Kirtland to Missouri in the winter of 1838, the Saints’ exodus from Kirtland later that year, the disciplining of the Missouri presidency, and the outbreak of the Missouri War and arrest of JS. Thus, B-1 provides substantial detail regarding a significant period of church expansion and transition as well as travail.

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