43990773

History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

June 9 honorably, and stood up in defence of the persecuted, in a manner worthy of high minded and honorable gentlemen. Some had even been told, that if they engaged on the side of the defence, they need never look to the Citizens of that County for any political favors. But they were not to be over-awed by the popular clamor, or be deterred from an act of public duty by any insinuations or threats whatever; and stated, that if they had not before determined to take a part in the defence, they, after hearing the threats of the community, were not fully determined to discharge their duty. The Counsel for the defence spoke well, without exception, and strongly urged the legality of the Court examining testimony to prove that the whole proceedings on the part of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, were base and illegal, and that the indictment was obtained through fraud, bribery, and corruption. The Court, after hearing the Counsel, adjourned about half past six o’clock P.M.
When I was at dinner, a man rushed in and said, “which is Jo Smith, I have got a five dollar Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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Bill, and I’ll be darn’d if he don’t take it back, Ill sue him, for his name is to it.” I replied I am the man, took the bill, and paid him the specie, which he — — took very reluctantly, being anxious to kick up a fuss.
The crowd in the Court was so intense, that Judge Douglass Stephen A. Douglas

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

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ordered the Sheriff of Warren Co. to keep the Spectators back; but he neglected doing so, when the Judge

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
fined him ten dollars; in a few minutes he again ordered the Sheriff to keep the men back, from crowding the Prisoner and Witnesses, he replied, “I have told a Constable to do it,” when the Judge

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
immediately said “Clerk add ten dollars more to that fine,” the Sheriff finding neglect rather expensive, then attended to his duty.
A young Lawyer from Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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volunteered to plead against me, he tried his utmost to convict me, but was so high with liquor, and chewed so much tobacco, that he often called for cold water; before he had spoken many minutes, he turned sick, requested to be excused by the Court, and went out of the Court house, puking all the way down stairs. (As the Illinoisans call the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
people pukes, this circumstance caused considerable amusement, to the Members of the Bar—) during his plea, his language was so outrageous, that the Judge

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
was twice under the necessity of ordering him to be silent.
Mr. O H. Browning then commenced his plea, and in a short time the puking Lawyer, — — — — — — returned and requested the privilege of finishing his plea, which was allowed.
Afterwards Mr. Browning resumed his pleadings which were powerful, and when he gave a recitation of what he himself had seen, at Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

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, and on the Banks of the Mississippi River

Principal U.S. river running southward from Itasca Lake, Minnesota, to Gulf of Mexico. Covered 3,160-mile course, 1839 (now about 2,350 miles). Drains about 1,100,000 square miles. Steamboat travel on Mississippi very important in 1830s and 1840s for shipping...

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, when the Saints were “exterminated from Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
,” where he tracked the persecuted women and children by their bloody foot marks in the Snow; they were so affecting, that the Spectators were often dissolved in tears, Judge Douglass

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
himself and most of the Officers wept, for they were under the necessity of keeping the Spectators, company.
Elder Amasa Lyman

30 Mar. 1813–4 Feb. 1877. Boatman, gunsmith, farmer. Born at Lyman, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Son of Boswell Lyman and Martha Mason. Baptized into LDS church by Lyman E. Johnson, 27 Apr. 1832. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, May–June 1832. Ordained an...

View Full Bio
during the evening preached a brilliant discourse in the Court house, on the first principles of the gospel, which changed the feelings of the people very materially.
The following Letter is from the Editor of the Times and Seasons
“American Hotel, Monmouth, Warren County, Ill. June 9th., 1841. Wednesday evening— We have just returned from the Court House, where we have listened to one of the most eloquent speeches ever uttered by mortal man in favor of justice and liberty, by O. H. Browning Esqre., who has done himself immortal honor in the sight of all patriotic citizens who listened to the same— He occupied the attention of the court for more than two hours, and showed the falsity of the arguments of the opposite Council, and laid down principles in a lucid and able manner, which ought to guide the Court in admitting testimony for the defendant, Joseph Smith— We have heard Mr. Browning on former occasions, when he has frequently delighted his audience by his eloquence; but on this occasion he exceeded our most sanguine expectations. The sentiments he advanced were just, generous and exalted, he soared above the petty quibbles which the opposite Council urged, and triumphantly, in a manner and eloquence peculiar to himself, avowed himself the friend of humanity, and boldly, nobly, and independently, stood up for the rights of those who had waded through seas of oppression, and floods of injustice, and had sought a shelter in the State of Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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. It was an effort worthy of a high minded and honorable gentleman, such as we ever considered him to be, since we have had the pleasure of his acquaintance. Soon after we came out of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, he sympathized with us in our afflictions and we are indeed rejoiced to know that he yet maintains the same principles of benevolence. His was not an effort of a Lawyer anxious to earn his fee; but the pure and patriotic feelings of christian benevolence and a sense of justice and of right. While he was answering the monstrous and ridiculous arguments urged by the opposing Council, that Joseph Smith might go to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
and have his trial; he stated the circumstances of our being driven from that State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, and feelingly and emphatically pointed out the impossibility of our obtaining justice there. There we were forbidden to enter in consequence of the order of the Executive

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

View Full Bio
[p. 1206]
<June 9> honorably, and stood up in defence of the persecuted, in a manner worthy of  high minded and honorable gentlemen. Some had even been told, that if they  engaged on the side of the defence, they need never look to the Citizens of that  County for any political favors. But they were not to be over-awed by the  popular clamor, or be deterred from an act of public duty by any insinuations  or threats whatever; and stated, that if they had not before determined to  take a part in the defence, they, after hearing the threats of the community,  were not fully determined to discharge their duty. The Counsel for the  defence spoke well, without exception, and strongly urged the legality of the  Court examining testimony to prove that the whole proceedings on the  part of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, were base and illegal, and that the indictment was  obtained through fraud, bribery, and corruption. The Court, after hearing  the Counsel, adjourned about half past six o’clock P.M.
<When I was at dinner, a man rushed in and said, “which is Jo Smith, I have got a five dollar Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
Bill, and I’ll be darn’d if he don’t take it back, Ill sue him, for his name is to it.” I replied I am the man, took the bill, and paid him the specie,  which he — — took very reluctantly, being anxious to kick up a fuss.>
<The crowd in the Court was so intense, that Judge Douglass [Stephen A. Douglas]

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
ordered the Sheriff of Warren Co. to keep the Spectators back; but he neglected doing so, when the Judge

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
fined him ten dollars; in a few minutes he again ordered the Sheriff to keep the men back,  from crowding the Prisoner and Witnesses, he replied, “I have told a Constable to do it,” when the Judge

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
immediately said “Clerk add ten dollars more to that fine,” the Sheriff finding neglect rather expensive, then attended to his duty.>
<A young Lawyer from Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
volunteered to plead against me, he tried his utmost to convict me, but was so high with liquor, and chewed so much tobacco, that he often called for cold water; before he had spoken many minutes, he turned sick,  requested to be excused by the Court, and went out of the Court house, puking all the way down stairs. (As the Illinoisans call the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
people pukes, this circumstance caused considerable amusement, to the Members of the Bar—) during his plea, his language  was so outrageous, that the Judge

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
was twice under the necessity of ordering him to be silent.>
<Mr. O H. Browning then commenced his plea, and in a short time the puking Lawyer, — — — — — — returned and requested the privilege of finishing his plea, which was allowed.>
<Afterwards Mr. Browning resumed his pleadings which were powerful, and when he gave a recitation of what he himself had seen, at Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

More Info
, and on the Banks of the Mississippi River

Principal U.S. river running southward from Itasca Lake, Minnesota, to Gulf of Mexico. Covered 3,160-mile course, 1839 (now about 2,350 miles). Drains about 1,100,000 square miles. Steamboat travel on Mississippi very important in 1830s and 1840s for shipping...

More Info
, when the Saints were “exterminated from Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
,” where he tracked the  persecuted women and children by their bloody foot marks in the Snow; they were so affecting, that the Spectators were often dissolved in tears, Judge Douglass

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
himself and most of the Officers wept, for they were under the necessity of keeping the Spectators, company.>
<Elder Amasa Lyman

30 Mar. 1813–4 Feb. 1877. Boatman, gunsmith, farmer. Born at Lyman, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Son of Boswell Lyman and Martha Mason. Baptized into LDS church by Lyman E. Johnson, 27 Apr. 1832. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, May–June 1832. Ordained an...

View Full Bio
during the evening preached a brilliant discourse in the Court house, on the first principles of the gospel, which changed the feelings of the people very materially.>
The following Letter is from the Editor of the Times and Seasons
“American Hotel, Monmouth, Warren County, Ill. June 9th., 1841. Wednesday  evening— We have just returned from the Court House, where we have  listened to one of the most eloquent speeches ever uttered by mortal  man in favor of justice and liberty, by O. H. Browning Esqre., who  has done himself immortal honor in the sight of all patriotic  citizens who listened to the same— He occupied the attention of  the court for more than two hours, and showed the falsity of the  arguments of the opposite Council, and laid down principles in  a lucid and able manner, which ought to guide the Court in  admitting testimony for the defendant, Joseph Smith— We have heard Mr.  Browning on former occasions, when he has frequently delighted his audience  by his eloquence; but on this occasion he exceeded our most sanguine  expectations. The sentiments he advanced were just, generous and  exalted, he soared above the petty quibbles which the opposite Council urged,  and triumphantly, in a manner and eloquence peculiar to himself,  avowed himself the friend of humanity, and boldly, nobly, and independently,  stood up for the rights of those who had waded through seas of oppression, and  floods of injustice, and had sought a shelter in the State of Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

More Info
. It was an  effort worthy of a high minded and honorable gentleman, such as we  ever considered him to be, since we have had the pleasure of his acquaintance.  Soon after we came out of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, he sympathized with us in our afflictions  and we are indeed rejoiced to know that he yet maintains the same  principles of benevolence. His was not an effort of a Lawyer anxious  to earn his fee; but the pure and patriotic feelings of christian benevolence  and a sense of justice and of right. While he was answering the monstrous  and ridiculous arguments urged by the opposing Council, that Joseph Smith  might go to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
and have his trial; he stated the circumstances of  our being driven from that State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, and feelingly and emphatically  pointed out the impossibility of our obtaining justice there. There we  were forbidden to enter in consequence of the order of the Executive

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

View Full Bio
[p. 1206]
PreviousNext
This document, volume C-1, is the third of six volumes of the “Manuscript History of the Church.” The collection was compiled over an eighteen-year span from 1838 to 1856 and covers the period from 23 December 1805 to 8 August 1844. The narrative in this volume commences on 2 November 1838 with JS and other church leaders being held prisoner by the “Governor

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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’s forces” at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri, and concludes with the death of Bishop Vinson Knight

14 Mar. 1804–31 July 1842. Farmer, druggist, school warden. Born at Norwich, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Rudolphus Knight and Rispah (Rizpah) Lee. Married Martha McBride, 14 Mar. 1826. Moved to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., New York, by Mar. 1834....

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at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, on 31 July 1842. For a more complete discussion of the entire six-volume work, see the general introduction to this history.
Volume C-1 was created beginning on or just after 24 February 1845 and its narrative completed on 3 May although work continued on the volume through 3 July of that year (Richards, Journal, 24 and 28 Feb. 1845; Historian’s Office, Journal, 3 May 1845; 3 and 4 July 1845). It is in the handwriting of Thomas Bullock and contains 512 pages of primary text, plus 24 pages of addenda. Additional addenda for this volume were created at a later date in a separate volume, and will appear in this collection as a separate document. Compilers Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Thomas Bullock drew heavily from JS’s letters, discourses, and diary entries; meeting minutes; church and other periodicals and journals; and reminiscences, recollections, and letters of church members and other contacts. At JS’s behest, they had maintained the first-person, chronological-narrative format established in previous volumes, as if JS were the author. Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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, George A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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, and others reviewed and modified the manuscript prior to its eventual publication in the Salt Lake City newspaper Deseret News.
The historical narrative recorded in volume C-1 continued the account of JS’s life as prophet and president of the church. Critical events occurring within the forty-five-month period of this volume include the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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Mormon War; subsequent legal trials of church leaders; expulsion of the Saints from Missouri; missionary efforts in England by the Twelve

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

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and others; attempts by JS to obtain federal redress for the Missouri depredations; publication of the LDS Millennial Star in England; the migration of English converts to America; missionary efforts in other nations; the death of church patriarch Joseph Smith Sr.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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; the establishment of the Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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city charter; the commencement of construction of the Nauvoo temple

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

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; the Wisconsin “pinery”

Also known as pinery. Area near Black River where lumbering operation was established to provide timber for construction of Nauvoo temple, Nauvoo House, and other public buildings. Four mills established on Black River, ca. Sept. 1841: three near Black River...

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expedition that facilitated temple construction; the introduction of the doctrine of proxy baptism for deceased persons; the dedicatory prayer by Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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on the Mount of Olives in Palestine; publication of the “Book of Abraham” in the Nauvoo Times and Seasons; publication of the JS history often referred to as the “Wentworth letter;” the organization of the Female Relief Society of Nauvoo; and the inception of Nauvoo-era temple endowment ceremonies.

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