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History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

October 28 are — — — Stone. On the south of the river lies the Borough &c. In addition to these were hundreds of churches, chapels, spires and monuments standing in the midst of one universal dense mass of brick and stone buildings; covering about six miles square of ground. While viewing this scenery in a clear day and beholding the streets and bridges crowded with human beings of every rank and station, and with beasts and vehicles of every kind, and the Thames covered with — — — Shipping from the skiff to the man of war, a Prussian traveller (Citizen of Berlin) who was standing by our side, exclaimed “I have travelled over Europe and Asia and other parts of the world, but I have never before found a spot upon the face of the Earth which — — — presented to my view as grand a scenery as the one now lying before us.” This monument is 24 feet higher than Trajans Pillar at Rome; it cost $75,500 The following is inscribed upon one side of the monument in Latin “In the year of Christ 1666, the second day of September, eastward from hence, at the distance of two hundred and two feet, the height of this column, about midnight, a most terrible fire broke out, which, driven on by a high wind, not only wasted the adjacent part, but also places very remote, with incredible noise and fury: it consumed 89— churches, the gates of the City, Guildhall, many public structures, hospitals, schools, libraries, a vast number of stately edifices, 13,200 dwelling houses, 400 streets; and of 26 wards it utterly destroyed 15 and left 8 others shattered and half burnt. The ruins of the city were 436 acres, from the Tower by the Thames side, to the Temple church: from the North east gate along the City wall to Holborn bridge. To the estates and fortunes of the Citizens it was merciless, but to their lives very favorable, (only eight being lost) That it might in all things resemble the last conflagration of the world, the destruction was sudden, for in a small space of time the same City was seen most flourishing, and reduced to nothing three days after, when the fatal fire had baffled all human councils and endeavors; the opinion of all, as it were by the will of heaven, it stopped, and on every side was extinguished.” On the 1st. day of September we visited the Thames Tunnel, by descending about 80 feet into — — — — — the earth on the south side of the river, and entering the archway on the left which was finished 1120 feet and was beautifully lighted up with gas; we walked through it under the Thames, with the River and British shipping over our heads: in the middle of the tunnel there are only about 15 feet between the top of the arch and the bed of the river— there are two archways each 22 feet high, the whole length of the Tunnel; which affords free communication from one shore to the other. This is — — — — one of the most stupendous works of modern times and truly shows that man hath sought out many inventions. On the 24th. of August we visited St. Pauls — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — Cathedral which was first built by St. Augustine in the year 610. It was destroyed by fire in 961 and rebuilt the following year; it was not till the reign of Athelstan that London became the Metropolis of England and it was to this Prince, more perhaps, than to any of his predecessors, that the Cathedral of St. Paul was indebted for its permanent establishment and pre-eminence. In 1086 this [p. 1120]
<October 28> are — — — Stone. On the south of the river lies the Borough &c. In addition to these  were hundreds of churches, chapels, spires and monuments standing in the  midst of one universal dense mass of brick and stone buildings; covering about  six miles square of ground. While viewing this scenery in a clear day and  beholding the streets and bridges crowded with human beings of every rank  and station, and with beasts and vehicles of every kind, and the Thames  covered with — — — Shipping from the skiff to the man of war, a Prussian  traveller (Citizen of Berlin) who was standing by our side, exclaimed “I have  travelled over Europe and Asia and other parts of the world, but I have never  before found a spot upon the face of the Earth which — — — presented to my  view as grand a scenery as the one now lying before us.” This monument  is 24 feet higher than Trajans Pillar at Rome; it cost $75,500 The following is  inscribed upon one side of the monument in Latin “In the year of Christ  1666, the second day of September, <eastward> from hence, at the distance of two hundred  and two feet, the height of this column, about midnight, a most terrible fire  broke out, which, driven on by a high wind, not only wasted the adjacent part,  but also places very remote, with incredible noise and fury: it consumed 89—  churches, the gates of the City, Guildhall, many public structures, hospitals, schools,  libraries, a vast number of stately edifices, 13,200 dwelling houses, 400 streets; and  <of> 26 wards it utterly destroyed 15 and left 8 others shattered and half burnt.  The ruins of the city were 436 acres, from the Tower by the Thames side, to  the Temple church: from the North east gate along the City wall to Holborn  bridge. To the estates and fortunes of the Citizens it was merciless, but to  their lives very favorable, (only eight being lost) That it might in all things  resemble the last conflagration of the world, the destruction was sudden, for in  a small space of time the same City was seen most flourishing, and reduced  to nothing three days after, when the fatal fire had baffled all human councils  and endeavors; the opinion of all, as it were by the will of heaven, it stopped,  and on every side was extinguished.” On the 1st. day of September we visited  the Thames Tunnel, by descending about 80 feet into — — — — — the earth on the  south side of the river, and entering the archway on the left which was finished  1120 feet and was beautifully lighted up with gas; we walked through it under the  Thames, with the River and British shipping over our heads: in the middle of the  <tunnel> there <are> only about 15 feet between the top of the arch and the bed of  the river— there are two archways <each> 22 feet high, the whole length of the Tunnel;  which afford<s> free communication from one shore to the other. This is — — — —  one of the most stupendous works of modern times and truly shows that man  hath sought out many inventions. On the 24th. of August we visited St. Pauls  — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —  Cathedral <which> was first built by St. Augustine in the year 610. It was  destroyed by fire in 961 and rebuilt the following year; it was not till the reign  of Athelstan that London became the Metropolis of England and it was to this  Prince, more perhaps, than to any of his predecessors, that the Cathedral of St. Paul  was indebted for its permanent establishment and pre-eminence. In 1086 this [p. 1120]
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JS, History, 1838–1856, vol. C-1, created 24 Feb. 1845–3 July 1845; handwriting of Thomas Bullock, Franklin D. Richards

2 Apr. 1821–9 Dec. 1899. Carpenter, businessman, newspaper editor. Born at Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Phinehas Richards and Wealthy Dewey. Raised Congregationalist. Baptized into LDS church by Phinehas Richards, 3 June 1838, at Richmond...

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, Jonathan Grimshaw, and Leo Hawkins; 512 pages, plus 24 pages of addenda; CHL. This is the third volume of a six-volume manuscript history of the church. This third volume covers the period from 2 November 1838 to 31 July 1842; the remaining five volumes, labeled A-1, B-1, D-1, E-1 and F-1, continue through 8 August 1844.

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