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History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

May 6 themselves our character, kept entirely aloof, but were ready at all times to listen to those who had the “poison of adders under their tongues,” and who sought our overthrow— Let every person who may have imbibed sentiments prejudicial to us, imitate the honorable example of our distinguished visitors (Douglass

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

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and Walker) and I believe they will find much less to condemn than they anticipated, and probably a great deal to commend— What makes the late visit more pleasing, is the fact, that Messrs. Douglass

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
and Walker, have long been held in high estimation as politicians, being champions of the two great parties that exist in the State

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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; but laying aside all party strife, like brothers, citizens and friends, they mingle with us, mutually disposed to extend to us that courtesy, respect, and friendship, which I hope we shall ever be proud to reciprocate— I am, very respectfully, yours &c Joseph Smith.”
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8 May 1841 • Saturday

8 Saturday 8. Brother William Smith

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

View Full Bio
is preaching in Pennsylvania

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

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Accounts of the progress of the Gospel from the Elders abroad are very encouraging.
A magazine of 300 barrels of gunpowder at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina exploded, blowing the Fort, seven other buildings and forty persons to atoms.

12 May 1841 • Wednesday

12 Wednesday 12. The Rochester with the Elders, came in sight of Cape Sable, Nova Scotia.

15 May 1841 • Saturday

15 Good news has recently reached us from Tennessee, New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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, Upper Canada

British colony of Canada divided into Upper Canada and Lower Canada, 1791; reunited 1841. Upper Canada’s boundaries corresponded roughly to portion of present-day Ontario south of Hudson Bay watershed. Population in 1840 about 430,000. Immigrants mainly from...

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& New Orleans

Settled by French, 1717. Acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803. City, port of entry, and parish seat of justice. Population in 1840 about 100,000. Important trade center on Mississippi River. Branch of LDS church established in city, winter 1840–1841...

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.
The Elders are baptizing in all directions.

16 May 1841 • Sunday

16 Sunday 16. I addressed the Saints— The following is a sketch of my Sermon by the Editor of the Times and Seasons,
“At 10 o clock A.M. a large concourse of the Saints assembled on the Meeting Ground, and were addressed by President Joseph Smith, who spoke at considerable length. He commenced his observations by remarking that the kindness of our heavenly Father, called for our heartfelt gratitude. He * then observed that Satan was generally blamed for the evils which we did, but if he was the cause of all our wickedness, men could not be condemned. The devil cannot compel mankind to do evil, all was voluntary. Those who resist the Spirit of God, are liable to be led into temptation, and then the association of heaven is withdrawn from those who refuse to be made partakers of such great glory — God would not exert any compulsory means, and the Devil could not; and such ideas as were entertained by many, were absurd. The creature was made subject to vanity, not willingly, but Christ subjected the same in hope— we are all subject to vanity while we travel through the crooked paths, and difficulties which surround us. Where is the man that is free from vanity? None ever were perfect but Jesus, and why was he perfect? because he was the Son of God, and had the fulness of the Spirit, and greater power than any Man. But, notwithstanding our vanity, we look forward with hope, (because “we are subjected in hope,”) to the time of our deliverance. He then made some observations on the first principles of the gospel, observing that many of the Saints who had come from different states and nations had only a very superficial knowledge of these principles, not having heard them fully investigated. He then briefly stated the principles of faith, repentance and baptism for the remission of sins, which were believed by some of the religious societies of the day, but the doctrine of laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost, was discarded by them. The speaker then referred to the 6th. chap. of Hebrews 1 and 2 verses, “not [p. 1202]
<May 6> themselves our character, kept entirely aloof, but were ready at all times  to listen to those who had the “poison of adders under their tongues,” and  who sought our overthrow— Let every person who may have imbibed  sentiments prejudicial to us, imitate the honorable example of our  distinguished visitors (Douglass

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
and Walker) and I believe they will find  much less to condemn than they anticipated, and probably a great deal  to commend— What makes the late visit more pleasing, is the fact,  that Messrs. Douglass

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

View Full Bio
and Walker, have long been held in high estimation as  politicians, being champions of the two great parties that exist in the State

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

More Info
;  but laying aside all party strife, like brothers, citizens and friends, they  mingle with us, mutually disposed to extend to us <that> courtesy, respect, and  friendship, which I hope we shall ever be proud to reciprocate— I am,  very respectfully, yours &c Joseph Smith.”
[1 line blank]

8 May 1841 • Saturday

<8> Saturday 8. Brother William Smith

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

View Full Bio
is preaching in Pennsylvania

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

More Info
Accounts of the progress of the Gospel  from the Elders abroad are very encouraging.
<A magazine of 300 barrels of gunpowder at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina exploded, blowing the Fort, seven other buildings and forty persons to atoms.>

12 May 1841 • Wednesday

<12> <Wednesday 12. The Rochester with the Elders, came in sight of Cape Sable, Nova Scotia.>

15 May 1841 • Saturday

<15> Good news has recently reached us from Tennessee, New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

More Info
, Upper Canada

British colony of Canada divided into Upper Canada and Lower Canada, 1791; reunited 1841. Upper Canada’s boundaries corresponded roughly to portion of present-day Ontario south of Hudson Bay watershed. Population in 1840 about 430,000. Immigrants mainly from...

More Info
& New Orleans

Settled by French, 1717. Acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803. City, port of entry, and parish seat of justice. Population in 1840 about 100,000. Important trade center on Mississippi River. Branch of LDS church established in city, winter 1840–1841...

More Info
.
<The Elders are baptizing in all directions.>

16 May 1841 • Sunday

<16> Sunday 16. I addressed the Saints— The following <is a sketch> of my Sermon  by the Editor <of the Times and Seasons>,
“At 10 o clock A.M. a large concourse of the Saints assembled on the  Meeting Ground, and were addressed by President Joseph Smith, who spoke at  considerable length. He commenced his observations by remarking that  the kindness of our heavenly Father, called for our heartfelt gratitude. He  <*> then observed that Satan was generally blamed for the evils which we did,  but if he was the cause of all our wickedness, men could not be condemned.  The devil cannot compel mankind to <do> evil, all was voluntary. Those who  resist the Spirit of God, are liable to be led into temptation, and then the  association of heaven is withdrawn from those who refuse to be made partakers  of such great glory — God would not exert any compulsory means, and the  Devil could not; and such ideas as were entertained by many, were absurd.  The creature was made subject to vanity, not willingly, but Christ subjected the  same in hope— we are all subject to vanity while we travel through the crooked  paths, and difficulties which surround us. Where is the man that is free from  vanity? None ever were perfect but Jesus, and why was he perfect? because he  was the Son of God, and had the fulness of the Spirit, and greater power than any  Man. But, notwithstanding our vanity, we look forward with hope, (because “we  are subjected in hope,”) to the time of our deliverance. He then made some  observations on the first principles of the gospel, observing that many of the Saints  who had come from different states and nations had only a very superficial  knowledge of these principles, not having heard them fully investigated. He then  briefly stated the principles of faith, repentance and baptism for the remission  of sins, which were believed by some of the religious societies of the day, but the  doctrine of laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost, was discarded by them.  The speaker then referred to the 6th. chap. of Hebrews 1 and 2 verses, “not [p. 1202]
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This document, volume C-1, is the third of six volumes of the “Manuscript History of the Church.” The collection was compiled over an eighteen-year span from 1838 to 1856 and covers the period from 23 December 1805 to 8 August 1844. The narrative in this volume commences on 2 November 1838 with JS and other church leaders being held prisoner by the “Governor

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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’s forces” at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri, and concludes with the death of Bishop Vinson Knight

14 Mar. 1804–31 July 1842. Farmer, druggist, school warden. Born at Norwich, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Rudolphus Knight and Rispah (Rizpah) Lee. Married Martha McBride, 14 Mar. 1826. Moved to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., New York, by Mar. 1834....

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at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, on 31 July 1842. For a more complete discussion of the entire six-volume work, see the general introduction to this history.
Volume C-1 was created beginning on or just after 24 February 1845 and its narrative completed on 3 May although work continued on the volume through 3 July of that year (Richards, Journal, 24 and 28 Feb. 1845; Historian’s Office, Journal, 3 May 1845; 3 and 4 July 1845). It is in the handwriting of Thomas Bullock and contains 512 pages of primary text, plus 24 pages of addenda. Additional addenda for this volume were created at a later date in a separate volume, and will appear in this collection as a separate document. Compilers Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Thomas Bullock drew heavily from JS’s letters, discourses, and diary entries; meeting minutes; church and other periodicals and journals; and reminiscences, recollections, and letters of church members and other contacts. At JS’s behest, they had maintained the first-person, chronological-narrative format established in previous volumes, as if JS were the author. Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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, George A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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, and others reviewed and modified the manuscript prior to its eventual publication in the Salt Lake City newspaper Deseret News.
The historical narrative recorded in volume C-1 continued the account of JS’s life as prophet and president of the church. Critical events occurring within the forty-five-month period of this volume include the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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Mormon War; subsequent legal trials of church leaders; expulsion of the Saints from Missouri; missionary efforts in England by the Twelve

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

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and others; attempts by JS to obtain federal redress for the Missouri depredations; publication of the LDS Millennial Star in England; the migration of English converts to America; missionary efforts in other nations; the death of church patriarch Joseph Smith Sr.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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; the establishment of the Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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city charter; the commencement of construction of the Nauvoo temple

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

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; the Wisconsin “pinery”

Also known as pinery. Area near Black River where lumbering operation was established to provide timber for construction of Nauvoo temple, Nauvoo House, and other public buildings. Four mills established on Black River, ca. Sept. 1841: three near Black River...

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expedition that facilitated temple construction; the introduction of the doctrine of proxy baptism for deceased persons; the dedicatory prayer by Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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on the Mount of Olives in Palestine; publication of the “Book of Abraham” in the Nauvoo Times and Seasons; publication of the JS history often referred to as the “Wentworth letter;” the organization of the Female Relief Society of Nauvoo; and the inception of Nauvoo-era temple endowment ceremonies.

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