43990773

History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

October 9 course in relation to meeting your demands. The “twelve” as they are denominated in the “Times and Seasons” were ordered by the Conference to make arrangements in the Eastern branches of the Church, ordering them to go to you and turn over their property as you and they might agree, and take up our obligations, and bring them here, and receive property here for them; And I have been ordered by the Conference to write this letter to you, informing you of the measures which are about to be taken to make all things right. I would inform you that Dr. Galland

15 May 1791–27 Sept. 1858. Merchant, postmaster, land speculator, doctor. Born at Somerset Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Matthew Galland and Hannah Fenno. Married first Nancy Harris, 22 Mar. 1811, in Madison Co., Ohio. Married second Margaret Knight, by 1816....

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has not returned to the Western Country as yet. He has a considerable amount of money in his hands which was to have been paid to you, as we intended. He is on his way, for aught we know, and is retarded in his journey by some misfortune or other. He may return, however, as yet, and give a just and honorable account of himself. We hope this may be the case. I am sorrowful on account of your disappointments. It is a great disappointment to me as well as to yourselves. As to the growth of our place, it is very rapid, and it would be more so, were it not for sickness and death. There have been many deaths which leave a melancholy reflection, but we cannot help it. When God speaks from the heavens to call us hence, we must submit to his mandates. And as for your sincerity and friendship, Gentlemen, we have not the most distant doubt. We will not have any. We know it is for your interest to do us good, and for our welfare and happiness to be punctual in the fulfilment of all our Vows. And we think for the future you will have no cause for complaint. We intend to struggle with all our misfortunes of life, and shoulder them up handsomely like men. We ask nothing therefore, but what ought to be required between Man and Man, and by those principles which bind man to man, by kindred blood, in bearing our own part in every thing which duty calls us to do, as not inferior to any of the human race; and we will be treated as such, although we differ with some in matters of opinion in things (viz Religious Matters) for which we only feel ourselves amenable to the Eternal God. And may God forbid that pride, ambition, a Want of humanity, or any degree of importance, unjustly, should have any dominion in our bosoms. We are the Sons of Adam. We are the free born sons of America

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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; and having been trampled upon and our rights taken from us, even our Constitutional rights, by a great many who boast themselves of being valiant in freedom’s cause, while their hearts possess not a spark of its benign and enlivening influence, it will afford a sufficient excuse, we hope, for any harsh remarks that may have been dropped by us, when we thought there was an assumption of Superiority designed to gall our feelings. We are very sensitive as a people— we confess it— But we want to be pardoned for our sins, if any we have committed. With regard to the time when the first payment of interest should be called for, it appears that we misunderstood each other, But suffice it to say, that it shall not prevent our making arrangements concerning the whole matter— It is still however my firm conviction that my understanding concerning the interest was correct— I remain Gentlemen, with sentiments of respect— Yours &c Joseph Smith”—

10 October 1841 • Sunday

10. The Twelve met for the purpose of Council, and spent most of the day in visiting the sick.
Elder Erastus Snow

9 Nov. 1818–27 May 1888. Farmer, teacher, merchant, publisher, manufacturer. Born at St. Johnsbury, Caledonia Co., Vermont. Son of Levi Snow and Lucina Streeter. Baptized into LDS church by William Snow, 3 Feb. 1833, at Charleston, Orleans Co., Vermont. Ordained...

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writes from Northbridge, Mass: He had been laboring in Salem and vicinity four weeks, organized a branch of 30 Members, and the prospects are flattering. [p. 1234]
<October 9> course in relation to meeting your demands. The “twelve” as they are denominated  in the “Times and Seasons” were ordered by the Conference to make arrangements  in the Eastern branches of the Church, ordering them to go to you and turn  over their property as you and they might agree, and take up our obligations,  and bring them here, and receive property here for them; And I have been  ordered by the Conference to write this letter to you, informing you of the measures  which are about to be taken to make all things right. I would inform you  that Dr. Galland

15 May 1791–27 Sept. 1858. Merchant, postmaster, land speculator, doctor. Born at Somerset Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Matthew Galland and Hannah Fenno. Married first Nancy Harris, 22 Mar. 1811, in Madison Co., Ohio. Married second Margaret Knight, by 1816....

View Full Bio
has not returned to the Western Country as yet. He has  a considerable amount of money in his hands which was to have been  paid to you, as we intended. He is on his way, for aught we know, and  is retarded in his journey by some misfortune or other. He may return,  however, as yet, and give a just and honorable account of himself. We hope  this may be the case. I am sorrowful on account of your disappointments.  It is a great disappointment to me as well as to yourselves. As to the  growth of our place, it is very rapid, and it would be more so, were it not for  sickness and death. There have been many deaths which leave a melancholy  reflection, but we cannot help it. When God speaks from the heavens to call  us hence, we must submit to his mandates. And as for your sincerity  and friendship, Gentlemen, we have not the most distant doubt. We will  not have any. We know it is for your interest to do us good, and for  our welfare and happiness to be punctual in the fulfilment of all our Vows.  And we think for the future you will have no cause for complaint. We  intend to struggle with all our misfortunes of life, and shoulder them up  handsomely like men. We ask nothing therefore, but what ought to be required  between Man and Man, and by those principles which bind man to man,  by kindred blood, in bearing our own part in every thing which duty calls us  to do, as not inferior to any of the human race; and we will be treated as such,  although we differ with some in matters of opinion in things (viz Religious  Matters) for which we only feel ourselves amenable to the Eternal God. And  may God forbid that pride, ambition, a Want of humanity, or any degree  of importance, unjustly, should have any dominion in our bosoms. We are  the Sons of Adam. We are the free born sons of America

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

More Info
; and having  been trampled upon and our rights taken from us, even our Constitutional  rights, by a great many who boast themselves of being valiant in freedom’s  cause, while their hearts possess not a spark of its benign and enlivening  influence, it will afford a sufficient excuse, we hope, for any harsh remarks  that may have been dropped by us, when we thought there was an assumption  of Superiority designed to gall our feelings. We are very sensitive as a people—  we confess it— But we want to be pardoned for our sins, if any we have committed.  With regard to the time when the first payment of interest should be called  for, it appears that we misunderstood each other, But suffice it to say, that it shall  not prevent our making arrangements concerning the whole matter— It is still  however my firm conviction that my understanding concerning the interest was correct—  I remain Gentlemen, with sentiments of respect— Yours &c Joseph Smith”—

10 October 1841 • Sunday

<10.> <The Twelve met for the purpose of Council, and spent most of the day in visiting the sick.>
<Elder Erastus Snow

9 Nov. 1818–27 May 1888. Farmer, teacher, merchant, publisher, manufacturer. Born at St. Johnsbury, Caledonia Co., Vermont. Son of Levi Snow and Lucina Streeter. Baptized into LDS church by William Snow, 3 Feb. 1833, at Charleston, Orleans Co., Vermont. Ordained...

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writes from Northbridge, Mass: He had been laboring in Salem and vicinity four weeks, organized a branch of 30 Members, and the prospects are flattering.> [p. 1234]
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JS, History, 1838–1856, vol. C-1, created 24 Feb. 1845–3 July 1845; handwriting of Thomas Bullock, Franklin D. Richards

2 Apr. 1821–9 Dec. 1899. Carpenter, businessman, newspaper editor. Born at Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Phinehas Richards and Wealthy Dewey. Raised Congregationalist. Baptized into LDS church by Phinehas Richards, 3 June 1838, at Richmond...

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, Jonathan Grimshaw, and Leo Hawkins; 512 pages, plus 24 pages of addenda; CHL. This is the third volume of a six-volume manuscript history of the church. This third volume covers the period from 2 November 1838 to 31 July 1842; the remaining five volumes, labeled A-1, B-1, D-1, E-1 and F-1, continue through 8 August 1844.

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