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History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

17 November 1841 • Wednesday

November 17 Wednesday 17. Elders Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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and Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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went to La Harpe

18 November 1841 • Thursday

18 Thursday 18.
“Proceedings of a meeting of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, held at Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

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, November 18, 1841 opened by singing, and prayer by Elder Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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. The object of the meeting was then stated by the President

23 Mar. 1802–24 Sept. 1882. Miller, farmer, merchant. Born at Grafton, Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Son of Ezekiel Johnson and Julia Hills. Moved to Newport, Campbell Co., Kentucky, 1813. Moved to Pomfret, Chautauque Co., New York, 1815. Baptized into Baptist...

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which was for the purpose of taking into consideration the cases of Alanson Brown — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — James B. T. Page, and William H. Edwards, who stand indicted for Larceny, &c After the evidence was brought forward, it was unanimously resolved that said persons be expelled from the Church. Appropriate remarks were then made by Elders Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, [Willard] Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, Savage, Gurley and others, for the occasion. A charge was then preferred against Thomas S. Edwards for Assault and Battery, with evidence that a warrant was issued for his apprehension, and against William W. Edwards for being accessory to the same. [blank] Unanimously resolved that Thomas S. Edwards, and William W. Edwards also, be expelled from the Church. [blank] and that the proceedings of this meeting be published in the Times and Seasons. .
Joel H. Johnson

23 Mar. 1802–24 Sept. 1882. Miller, farmer, merchant. Born at Grafton, Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Son of Ezekiel Johnson and Julia Hills. Moved to Newport, Campbell Co., Kentucky, 1813. Moved to Pomfret, Chautauque Co., New York, 1815. Baptized into Baptist...

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— President. J. E. Johnson, Church Recorder”—

20 November 1841 • Saturday

20 See Addenda book page 44

21 November 1841 • Sunday

21

22 November 1841 • Monday

22 Monday 22. The following letter from Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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is from the Millenial Star.
“Alexandria Novr. 22, 1841— Dear Brother [Parley P.] Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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— A few minutes now offer for me to write, and I improve them in writing to you. I have only time to say that I have seen Jerusalem

Capital city of ancient Judea. Holy city of Christians, Jews, and Muslims. Population in 1835 about 11,000; in 1840 about 13,000; and in 1850 about 15,000. Described in 1836 as “greatly reduced from its ancient size and importance.” Occupied and governed ...

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precisely according to the vision which I had. I saw no one with me in the vision; and although Elder [John E.] Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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was appointed to accompany me there, yet I found myself there alone. The Lord knows that I have had a hard time, and suffered much, but I have great reason to thank him that I enjoy good health at present, and have a prospect before me of soon going to a civilized country, where I shall see no more turbans or camels. The heat is most oppressive, and has been all through Syria. I have not time to tell you how many days I have been at sea, without food, or how many snails I have eaten; but if I had had plenty of them I should have done very well. All this is contained in a former letter to you written from Jaffa. I have been at Cairo, on the Nile, because I could not get a passage direct. Syria is in a dreadful state— a war of extermination is going on between the Druses and Catholics. At the time I was at Beyroote a battle was fought in the mountains of Lebanon, near that place, and about 800 killed. Robberies, thefts, and murders, are daily being committed. It is no uncommon thing to find persons in the Street without heads. An English Officer in going from St. Jean d’Acre to Beyroote, found ten persons murdered in the Street, and was himself taken prisoner, but was rescued by the timely interference of the Pacha. The particulars of all these things are contained in a former letter.
See Margin
An American traveler, by the name of Gager who was a licensed minister of the Congregational or Presbyterian Church, left Jerusalem

Capital city of ancient Judea. Holy city of Christians, Jews, and Muslims. Population in 1835 about 11,000; in 1840 about 13,000; and in 1850 about 15,000. Described in 1836 as “greatly reduced from its ancient size and importance.” Occupied and governed ...

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in company with me. He was very unwell with the Jaundice when we left, and at Damietta we had to perform six day’s quarantine before we ascended the Nile. On our passage up he was taken very ill with a fever, and became helpless. I waited and tended upon him as well as our circumstances would allow; and when we landed at Bulock, I got four men to take him to the American Consuls, in Cairo, on a litter; I also took all his baggage there, and assisted in putting him upon a good bed— employed a good faithful Arabian nurse, and the English Doctor. After the physician had examined him, he told me that he was very low with a typhus fever, and that it would be doubtful whether he recovered. Under these circumstances I left him to obtain a passage to this place. After I had gone aboard a boat, and was just about pushing off, a letter came from the doctor, stating that poor Mr. Gager died in about two hours after I left him. He told me before we arrived at Cairo that he was 27 years of age, and his friends lived in Norwich, Connecticut; near New London, I think. There are many particulars concerning his death which would be interesting to his friends, but I have no time to write them now.
On Sunday morning, October 24, a good while before day, I arose from sleep and went out of the City

Capital city of ancient Judea. Holy city of Christians, Jews, and Muslims. Population in 1835 about 11,000; in 1840 about 13,000; and in 1850 about 15,000. Described in 1836 as “greatly reduced from its ancient size and importance.” Occupied and governed ...

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as soon as the Gates were opened, crossed the brook Cedron, and went upon the Mount of Olives, and there, in solemn silence, with pen, ink, and paper, just as I saw in the vision, offered up the following prayer to Him who lives for ever and ever:—
“O Thou! who art from everlasting to everlasting, [p. 1250]

17 November 1841 • Wednesday

<November 17> Wednesday 17. Elders Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

View Full Bio
and Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
went to La Harpe

18 November 1841 • Thursday

<18> Thursday 18.
“Proceedings of a meeting of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter  Day Saints, held at Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

More Info
, November 18, 1841 opened by singing, and prayer  by Elder Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

View Full Bio
. The object of the meeting was then stated by the President

23 Mar. 1802–24 Sept. 1882. Miller, farmer, merchant. Born at Grafton, Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Son of Ezekiel Johnson and Julia Hills. Moved to Newport, Campbell Co., Kentucky, 1813. Moved to Pomfret, Chautauque Co., New York, 1815. Baptized into Baptist...

View Full Bio
 which was for the purpose of taking into consideration the cases of Alanson Brown  — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — James B. T. Page, and William H. Edwards,  who stand indicted for Larceny, &c After the evidence was brought forward,  it was unanimously resolved that said <persons> be expelled from the  Church. Appropriate remarks were then made by Elders Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

View Full Bio
, [Willard] Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
,  Savage, Gurley and others, for the occasion. A charge was then preferred  against Thomas S. Edwards for Assault and Battery, with evidence that  a warrant was issued for his apprehension, and against William W. Edwards  for being accessory to the same. [blank] Unanimously resolved  that Thomas S. Edwards, and William W. Edwards also, be expelled from  the Church. [blank] <and> that the proceedings of this meeting be published  in the Times and Seasons. Resolved that all other church business be  laid over to conference. Resolved that this meeting be adjourned.
Joel H. Johnson

23 Mar. 1802–24 Sept. 1882. Miller, farmer, merchant. Born at Grafton, Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Son of Ezekiel Johnson and Julia Hills. Moved to Newport, Campbell Co., Kentucky, 1813. Moved to Pomfret, Chautauque Co., New York, 1815. Baptized into Baptist...

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— President. J. E. Johnson, Church Recorder”—

20 November 1841 • Saturday

<20> <See Addenda book page 44>

21 November 1841 • Sunday

<21> [illegible]

22 November 1841 • Monday

<22> Monday 22. <The following letter from Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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is from the Millenial Star.>
“Alexandria Novr. 22, 1841— Dear Brother [Parley P.] Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
— A few minutes now offer for  me to write, and I improve them in writing to you. I have only time to say  that I have seen Jerusalem

Capital city of ancient Judea. Holy city of Christians, Jews, and Muslims. Population in 1835 about 11,000; in 1840 about 13,000; and in 1850 about 15,000. Described in 1836 as “greatly reduced from its ancient size and importance.” Occupied and governed ...

More Info
precisely according to the vision which I had. I saw  no one with me in the vision; and although Elder [John E.] Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

View Full Bio
was appointed to accompany  me there, yet I found myself there alone. The Lord knows that I have had a  hard time, and suffered much, but I have great reason to thank him that I  enjoy good health at present, and have a prospect before me of soon going to a  civilized country, where I shall see no more turbans or camels. The heat is most  oppressive, and has been all through Syria. I have not time to tell you how  many days I have been at sea, without food, or how many snails I have eaten;  but if I had had plenty of them I should have done very well. All this is  contained in a former letter to you written from Jaffa. I have been at Cairo,  on the Nile, because I could not get a passage direct. Syria is in a dreadful state—  a war of extermination is going on between the Druses and Catholics. At the time  I was at Beyroote a battle was fought in the mountains of Lebanon, near that place,  and about 800 killed. Robberies, thefts, and murders, are daily being committed.  It is no uncommon thing to find persons in the Street without heads. An English  Officer in going from St. Jean d’Acre to Beyroote, found ten persons murdered in the  Street, and was himself taken prisoner, but was rescued by the timely interference  of the Pacha. The particulars of all these things are contained in a former letter.
<See Margin>
<An American traveler, by the name of Gager who was a licensed minister of the Congregational or Presbyterian Church, left Jerusalem

Capital city of ancient Judea. Holy city of Christians, Jews, and Muslims. Population in 1835 about 11,000; in 1840 about 13,000; and in 1850 about 15,000. Described in 1836 as “greatly reduced from its ancient size and importance.” Occupied and governed ...

More Info
in company with me. He was very unwell with the Jaundice when we left, and at Damietta we had to perform six day’s quarantine before we  ascended the Nile. On our passage up he was taken very ill with a fever, and became helpless. I waited and tended upon him as well as our circumstances would allow; and when we landed at Bulock, I got four men to take him to the American Consuls, in Cairo, on a litter; I also took all  his baggage there, and assisted in putting him upon a good bed— employed a good faithful Arabian nurse, and the English Doctor. After the physician had examined him, he told me that he was very low with a typhus fever, and that it would be doubtful whether he recovered.  Under these circumstances I left him to obtain a passage to this place. After I had gone aboard a boat, and was just about pushing off, a letter came from the doctor, stating that poor Mr. Gager died in about two hours after I left him. He told me before we arrived at  Cairo that he was 27 years of age, and his friends lived in Norwich, Connecticut; near New London, I think. There are many particulars concerning his death which would be interesting to his friends, but I have no time to write them now.>
On Sunday morning, October 24, a good while before day, I arose from sleep and  went out of the City

Capital city of ancient Judea. Holy city of Christians, Jews, and Muslims. Population in 1835 about 11,000; in 1840 about 13,000; and in 1850 about 15,000. Described in 1836 as “greatly reduced from its ancient size and importance.” Occupied and governed ...

More Info
as soon as the Gates were opened, crossed the brook Cedron,  and went upon the Mount of Olives, and there, in solemn silence, with pen,  ink, and paper, just as I saw in the vision, offered up the following prayer to Him  who lives for ever and ever:—
“O Thou! who art from everlasting to everlasting, [p. 1250]
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JS, History, 1838–1856, vol. C-1, created 24 Feb. 1845–3 July 1845; handwriting of Thomas Bullock, Franklin D. Richards

2 Apr. 1821–9 Dec. 1899. Carpenter, businessman, newspaper editor. Born at Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Phinehas Richards and Wealthy Dewey. Raised Congregationalist. Baptized into LDS church by Phinehas Richards, 3 June 1838, at Richmond...

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, Jonathan Grimshaw, and Leo Hawkins; 512 pages, plus 24 pages of addenda; CHL. This is the third volume of a six-volume manuscript history of the church. This third volume covers the period from 2 November 1838 to 31 July 1842; the remaining five volumes, labeled A-1, B-1, D-1, E-1 and F-1, continue through 8 August 1844.

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