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History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

March 1 purchased at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, or from any of our travelling Elders. As soon as the news of this discovery was made known, false reports, misrepresentation, and slander flew as on the wings of the wind in every direction, the house was frequently beset by mobs, and evil designing persons, several times I was shot at, and very narrowly escaped and every device was made use of to get the plates away from me but the power and blessing of God attended me, and several began to believe my testimony. On the sixth of April 1830, the “Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints” was first organized in the Town of should be: Fayette

Located in northern part of county between Seneca and Cayuga lakes. Area settled, by 1790. Officially organized as Washington Township, 14 Mar. 1800. Name changed to Fayette, 6 Apr. 1808. Population in 1830 about 3,200. Population in 1840 about 3,700. Significant...

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, Seneca Co, Manchester

Settled 1793. Formed as Burt Township when divided from Farmington Township, 31 Mar. 1821. Name changed to Manchester, 16 Apr. 1822. Included village of Manchester. Population in 1825 about 2,700. Population in 1830 about 2,800. JS reported first vision of...

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, Ontario County, State of New York. Some few were called and ordained by the Spirit of Revelation, and Prophesy, and began to preach as the Spirit gave them utterance, and though weak yet were they strengthened by the power of God, and many were brought to repentance, were immersed in the water, and were filled with the Holy Ghost by the laying on of hands. They saw visions and prophesied, devils were cast out and the sick healed by the laying on of hands. From that time the work rolled forth with astounding rapidity, and Churches were soon formed in the States of New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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, Pennsylvania

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

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, Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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, Indiana, Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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, and Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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; in the last named state a considerable settlement was formed in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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: numbers joined the Church and we were increasing rapidly; we made large purchases of land, our farms teemed with plenty, and peace and happiness were enjoyed in our domestic circle and throughout our neighborhood; but as we could not associate with our neighbors, who were many of them of the basest of men and had fled from the face of civilized society, to the frontier country to escape the hand of justice, in their midnight revels, their sabbath breaking, horseracing, and gambling, they commenced at first ridicule, then to persecute, and finally an organized mob assembled and burned our houses, tarred and feathered and whipped many of our brethren and finally drove them from their habitations; who houseless, and homeless, contrary to law, justice and humanity, had to wander on the bleak prairies till the children left the tracks of their blood on the prairie, this took place in the month of November, and they had no other covering but the canopy of heaven, in this inclement season of the year; this proceeding was winked at by the Government and although we had warrantee deeds for our land, and had violated no law we could obtain no redress. There were many sick, who were thus inhumanly driven from their houses, and had to endure all this abuse and to seek homes where they could be found. The result was, that a great many of them being deprived of the Comforts of life, and the necessary attendances, died; many children were left orphans; wives, widows; and husbands, widowers; Our farms were taken possession of by the mob, many thousands of cattle, sheep, horses, and hogs, were taken, and our household goods, store goods, and printing press, and type were broken, taken, or otherwise destroyed.
Many of our brethren removed to Clay

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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where they continued until 1836 three years; there was no violence offered but there were threatnings of violence. But in the Summer of 1836, these threatnings began to assume a more serious form; from threats, public meetings were called, resolutions were passed, [p. 1283]
<March 1> purchased at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, or from any of our travelling Elders. As soon  as the news of this discovery was made known, false reports, misrepresentation,  and slander flew as on the wings of the wind in every direction, the house was  frequently beset by mobs, and evil designing persons, several times I was shot at, and very  narrowly escaped and every device was made use of to get the plates away from me  but the power and blessing of God attended me, and several began to believe my  testimony. On the sixth of April 1830, the “Church of Jesus Christ of  Latter Day Saints” was first organized in the Town of <should be: Fayette

Located in northern part of county between Seneca and Cayuga lakes. Area settled, by 1790. Officially organized as Washington Township, 14 Mar. 1800. Name changed to Fayette, 6 Apr. 1808. Population in 1830 about 3,200. Population in 1840 about 3,700. Significant...

More Info
, Seneca Co,> Manchester

Settled 1793. Formed as Burt Township when divided from Farmington Township, 31 Mar. 1821. Name changed to Manchester, 16 Apr. 1822. Included village of Manchester. Population in 1825 about 2,700. Population in 1830 about 2,800. JS reported first vision of...

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, Ontario  County, State of New York. Some few were called and ordained by the Spirit  of Revelation, and Prophesy, and began to preach as the Spirit gave them utterance,  and though weak yet were they strengthened by the power of God, and many  were brought to repentance, were immersed in the water, and were filled with  the Holy Ghost by the laying on of hands. They saw visions and prophesied,  devils were cast out and the sick healed by the laying on of hands. From  that time the work rolled forth with astounding rapidity, and Churches were  soon formed in the States of New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

More Info
, Pennsylvania

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

More Info
, Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

More Info
, Indiana,  Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

More Info
, and Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
; in the last named state a considerable settlement  was formed in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
: numbers joined the Church and we were increasing  rapidly; we made large purchases of land, our farms teemed with plenty, and  peace and happiness were enjoyed in our domestic circle and throughout our  neighborhood; but as we could not associate with our neighbors, who were many  of them of the basest of men and had fled from the face of civilized society, to the  frontier country to escape the hand of justice, in their midnight revels, their  sabbath breaking, horseracing, and gambling, they commenced at first ridicule,  then to persecute, and finally an organized mob assembled and burned our  houses, tarred and feathered and whipped many of our brethren and finally  drove them from their habitations; who houseless, and homeless, contrary to  law, justice and humanity, had to wander on the bleak prairies till the children  left the tracks of their blood on the prairie, this took place in the month of  November, and they had no other covering but the canopy of heaven, in this  inclement season of the year; this proceeding was winked at by the Government  and although we had warrantee deeds for our land, and had violated no law  we could obtain no redress. There were many sick, who were thus  inhumanly driven from their houses, and had to endure all this abuse and  to seek homes where they could be found. The result was, that a great many  of them being deprived of the Comforts of life, and the necessary attendances,  died; many children were left orphans; wives, widows; and husbands, widowers;  Our farms were taken possession of by the mob, many thousands of cattle,  sheep, horses, and hogs, were taken, and our household goods, store goods, and  printing press, and type were broken, taken, or otherwise destroyed.
Many of our brethren removed to Clay

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
where they continued until 1836 three  years; there was no violence offered but there were threatnings of violence.  But in the Summer of 1836, these threatnings began to assume a more  serious form; from threats, public meetings were called, resolutions were passed, [p. 1283]
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JS, History, 1838–1856, vol. C-1, created 24 Feb. 1845–3 July 1845; handwriting of Thomas Bullock, Franklin D. Richards

2 Apr. 1821–9 Dec. 1899. Carpenter, businessman, newspaper editor. Born at Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Phinehas Richards and Wealthy Dewey. Raised Congregationalist. Baptized into LDS church by Phinehas Richards, 3 June 1838, at Richmond...

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, Jonathan Grimshaw, and Leo Hawkins; 512 pages, plus 24 pages of addenda; CHL. This is the third volume of a six-volume manuscript history of the church. This third volume covers the period from 2 November 1838 to 31 July 1842; the remaining five volumes, labeled A-1, B-1, D-1, E-1 and F-1, continue through 8 August 1844.

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