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History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

September 14th 1840 with his brother John Smith

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational Church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

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2400 miles in Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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, New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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, Pennsylvania

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

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, Vermont

Area served as early thoroughfare for traveling Indian tribes. French explored area, 1609, and erected fort on island in Lake Champlain, 1666. First settled by Massachusetts emigrants, 1724. Claimed by British colonies of New York and New Hampshire, but during...

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and New Hampshire, visiting the branches of the church in those States and bestowing patriarchal blessings on several hundred persons, preaching the gospel to all who would hear, and baptizing many. They arrived at Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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on the 2nd of Octr 1836. During the persecution in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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in 1837 he was made a prisoner but fortunately obtained his liberty, and after a very tedious journey in the spring and summer of 1838 he arrived at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri. After I and my brother Hyrum

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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were thrown into the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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Jails by the Mob he fled from under the exterminating order of Governor Lilburn W. Boggs

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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and made his escape in midwinter to Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

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Illinois from whence he removed to Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

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in the Spring of 1839. The exposures he suffered brought on consumption of which he died on this fourteenth day of September 1840 aged 69 years 2 months and 2 days
He was 6 feet 2 inches high, was very straight and remarkably well proportioned his ordinary weight was about 200 lbs, and he was very strong and active. In his young days he was famed as a wrestler, and Jacob like, he never wrestled with but one man, whom he could not throw. He was one of the most benevolent of men, opening his house to all who were destitute. While at Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

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, Illinois he fed hundreds of the poor saints who were flying from the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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persecutions although he had arrived there penniless himself. See page 1094. [1 line blank]

Addenda • 3 February 1841, first of two entries

City of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Hancock Co. Ills February 2nd. 1841 To the County Recorder of the County of Hancock

Formed from Pike Co., 1825. Described in 1837 as predominantly prairie and “deficient in timber.” Early settlers came mainly from mid-Atlantic and southern states. Population in 1835 about 3,200; in 1840 about 9,900; and in 1844 at least 15,000. Carthage ...

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. Dear Sir At a meeting of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, at this place, on Saturday the 30th day of January A.D. 1841 I was elected sole Trustee for said Church, to hold my office during life (my Successors to be the first Presidency of said Church) and vested with Plenary Powers, as sole Trustee in Trust for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, to receive, acquire, manage, or convey property, real personal or mixed, for the sole use and benefit of said Church, agreeably to the (see continuation page 24)

Addenda • April 1841

The following is copied from the Millenial Star of April 1841:
Difference between this copied in Addenda book page 20 to 24 the Baptists and Latter-Day Saints. From the “North Staffordshire Mercury.” Sir,— In a late publication, you reported the case of some persons who were taken before T. B. Rose, Esqre. for disturbing a congregation of “Latter-Day Saints”, or believers in the “Book of Mormon”. A teacher of that sect, on being asked by the Magistrate wherein they differed from the Baptists, replied, “in the laying on of hands;” but declined making an honest confession of those pecularities which separate them as widely from the Baptists as from every other denomination of the christian church. This was certainly prudent; but as the Baptists feel themselves dishonoured by such an alliance, they would be unjust to themselves were they to leave unanswered such a libel upon their denomination. The following very prominent marks of difference will enable your readers to judge for themselves.
1.— The Saints admit all persons indiscriminately to baptism, encouraging them to pass through that rite, with the promise that great spiritual improvement will follow. They baptize for remission of sins, without waiting for credible evidence of repentance for sin. But the Baptists admit none to that ordinance who [p. 21 [addenda]]
<September 14th 1840> with his brother John [Smith]

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational Church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

View Full Bio
2400 miles in Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

More Info
, New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

More Info
, Pennsylvania

Area first settled by Swedish immigrants, 1628. William Penn received grant for territory from King Charles II, 1681, and established British settlement, 1682. Philadelphia was center of government for original thirteen U.S. colonies from time of Revolutionary...

More Info
, Vermont

Area served as early thoroughfare for traveling Indian tribes. French explored area, 1609, and erected fort on island in Lake Champlain, 1666. First settled by Massachusetts emigrants, 1724. Claimed by British colonies of New York and New Hampshire, but during...

More Info
and  New Hampshire, visiting the branches of the church in those States and bestowing  patriarchal blessings on several hundred persons, preaching the gospel to all who  would hear, and baptizing many. They arrived at Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
on the 2nd of  Octr 1836. During the persecution in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
in 1837 he was made a prisoner  but fortunately obtained his liberty, and after a very tedious journey in the spring  and summer of 1838 he arrived at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, Missouri. After I and my brother  Hyrum

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
were thrown into the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
Jails by the Mob he fled from under the  exterminating order of Governor Lilburn W. Boggs

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

View Full Bio
and made his escape in  midwinter to Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

More Info
Illinois from whence he removed to Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

More Info
in the  Spring of 1839. The exposures he suffered brought on consumption of which he  died on this fourteenth day of September 1840 aged 69 years 2 months and 2 days
He was 6 feet 2 inches high, was very straight and remarkably well proportioned  his ordinary weight was about 200 lbs, and he was very strong and active. In  his young days he was famed as a wrestler, and Jacob like, he never wrestled with  but one man, whom he could not throw. He was one of the most benevolent  of men, opening his house to all who were destitute. While at Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

More Info
, Illinois  he fed hundreds of the poor saints who were flying from the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
persecutions  although he had arrived there penniless himself. See page 1094. [1 line blank]

Addenda • 3 February 1841, first of two entries

Leo Hawkins handwriting ends; Thomas Bullock begins.  


City of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, Hancock Co. Ills February 2nd. 1841 To the County Recorder of the County of Hancock

Formed from Pike Co., 1825. Described in 1837 as predominantly prairie and “deficient in timber.” Early settlers came mainly from mid-Atlantic and southern states. Population in 1835 about 3,200; in 1840 about 9,900; and in 1844 at least 15,000. Carthage ...

More Info
.  Dear Sir At a meeting of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, at this place, on Saturday the 30th day of  January A.D. 1841 I was elected sole Trustee for said Church, to hold my office during life (my Successors to be the first Presidency of  said Church) and vested with Plenary Powers, as sole Trustee in Trust for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, to receive,  acquire, manage, or convey property, real personal or mixed, for the sole use and benefit of said Church, agreeably to the (see continuation page 24)

Addenda • April 1841

Thomas Bullock handwriting ends; Jonathan Grimshaw begins.  


The following is copied from the Millenial Star of April 1841:
Difference between  <this copied in Addenda book page 20 to 24> the Baptists and Latter-Day Saints. From the “North Staffordshire Mercury.”  Sir,— In a late publication, you reported the case of some persons who were  taken before T. B. Rose, Esqre. for disturbing a congregation of “Latter- Day Saints”, or believers in the “Book of Mormon”. A teacher of that  sect, on being asked by the Magistrate wherein they differed from the  Baptists, replied, “in the laying on of hands;” but declined making an  honest confession of those pecularities which separate them as widely from  the Baptists as from every other denomination of the christian church.  This was certainly prudent; but as the Baptists feel themselves dis honoured by such an alliance, they would be unjust to themselves  were they to leave unanswered such a libel upon their denomination.  The following very prominent marks of difference will enable  your readers to judge for themselves.
1.— The Saints admit all persons indiscriminately to baptism,  encouraging them to pass through that rite, with the promise that  great spiritual improvement will follow. They baptize for  remission of sins, without waiting for credible evidence of repentance  for sin. But the Baptists admit none to that ordinance who [p. 21 [addenda]]
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JS, History, 1838–1856, vol. C-1, created 24 Feb. 1845–3 July 1845; handwriting of Thomas Bullock, Franklin D. Richards

2 Apr. 1821–9 Dec. 1899. Carpenter, businessman, newspaper editor. Born at Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Phinehas Richards and Wealthy Dewey. Raised Congregationalist. Baptized into LDS church by Phinehas Richards, 3 June 1838, at Richmond...

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, Jonathan Grimshaw, and Leo Hawkins; 512 pages, plus 24 pages of addenda; CHL. This is the third volume of a six-volume manuscript history of the church. This third volume covers the period from 2 November 1838 to 31 July 1842; the remaining five volumes, labeled A-1, B-1, D-1, E-1 and F-1, continue through 8 August 1844.

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