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History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

1842 Jan 20. to Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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and was ordained an Elder in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints at the first conference held at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
in October 1839: removed to Ambrosia, Lee County Iowa, where he was appointed Post Master and Deputy County Surveyor; he surveyed the city plats of Nashville

Settled by Isaac Galland, 1829. Undeveloped town site purchased by LDS church, 1839. Laid out and incorporated, 1841, but charter never adopted. Featured one of nine branches within Iowa Stake (later Zarahemla Stake). Branch consisted of eighty members, Aug...

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and Zarahemla

Located about one mile west of Mississippi River; area settled, by May 1839. Site for town selected by JS, 2 July 1839, and later confirmed by revelation, Mar. 1841. Iowa stake of LDS church organized by JS, by Oct. 1839. Stake name changed to Zarahemla, ...

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, under the direction of President Joseph Smith: was sent by the fall Conference in 1841 to Pittsburgh

Also spelled Pittsbourg, Pittsbourgh, and Pittsburg. Major industrial port city in southwestern Pennsylvania. Near location where Monongahela and Allegheny rivers converge to form Ohio River. French established Fort DuQuesne, 1754. British captured fort, ...

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. Penn. where he died Jan 20. 1842 while in the discharge of his duties having won the affections of all the Saints with whom he had become acquainted by his integrity and perseverance. His opportunity for schooling had been limited, but by his own exertion he attained to an excellent education, and collected quite a respectable library

Addenda • 29 January 1842

29
“Manchester Jan 29. 1842
To Prest. [Brigham] Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Elders [Heber C.] Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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and [Willard] Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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. Beloved Brethren, Page 1273 Soon after your departure a clergyman of the Church of England called upon my employer, to request that he might have an interview with me, as he had a wish to propound certain questions to me; upon his request being complied with, we retired to a private room, when he produced a long list of questions written down, opposite to which he wrote my answers. The rise of the church, priesthood, doctrines, offices, sacraments &c. were the principle queries he advanced. When he demurred to any of our principles I was proceeding to explain, but he cut my discourse short by saying he would not hold any controversy, his object being only to obtain information. After the disposal of his queries he wished to be informed where he could obtain the whole of the publications of the Latter Day Saints as he wished to be in possession of them; I informed him at 47 Oxford Street, and he promised to send for them. Soon after the visit of this reverend gentleman, I had reason to suspect that undermining operations were in progress against me, I therefore tendered my resignation to the directors, but they would not accept it, and very soon afterwards a public accountant was employed by them to investigate their accounts for several years back, and I was happy to be enabled to answer satisfactorily every question that was asked of me respecting them.
After this another minister sent a lengthy article extracted from an American paper, purporting to be the production of a Mr Anthony, with a request that I would “read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest” the same. I replied to the statements of Mr A. and after disposing of them paragraph for paragraph. I told him that I was obliged by his favoring me with it, inasmuch as it satisfied my mind, and was confirmatory [p. 52]
<1842  Jan 20.> to Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
and was ordained an Elder in the Church of Jesus Christ  of Latter Day Saints at the first conference held at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
in October  1839: removed to Ambrosia, Lee County Iowa, where he was appointed  Post Master and Deputy County Surveyor; he surveyed the city plats  of Nashville

Settled by Isaac Galland, 1829. Undeveloped town site purchased by LDS church, 1839. Laid out and incorporated, 1841, but charter never adopted. Featured one of nine branches within Iowa Stake (later Zarahemla Stake). Branch consisted of eighty members, Aug...

More Info
and Zarahemla

Located about one mile west of Mississippi River; area settled, by May 1839. Site for town selected by JS, 2 July 1839, and later confirmed by revelation, Mar. 1841. Iowa stake of LDS church organized by JS, by Oct. 1839. Stake name changed to Zarahemla, ...

More Info
, under the direction of President Joseph  Smith: was sent by the fall Conference in 1841 to Pittsburgh

Also spelled Pittsbourg, Pittsbourgh, and Pittsburg. Major industrial port city in southwestern Pennsylvania. Near location where Monongahela and Allegheny rivers converge to form Ohio River. French established Fort DuQuesne, 1754. British captured fort, ...

More Info
. Penn. where he  died Jan 20. 1842 while in the discharge of his duties having won the affections  of all the Saints with whom he had become acquainted by his integrity  and perseverance. His opportunity for schooling had been limited, but  by his own exertion he attained to an excellent education, and collected  quite a respectable library

Addenda • 29 January 1842

<29>
“Manchester Jan 29. 1842
To Prest. [Brigham] Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

View Full Bio
, Elders [Heber C.] Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

View Full Bio
and [Willard] Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
. Beloved Brethren,  <Page 1273> Soon after your departure a clergyman of the Church of England called  upon my employer, to request that he might have an interview with me,  as he had a wish to propound certain questions to me; upon his request  being complied with, we retired to a private room, when he produced a  long list of questions written down, opposite to which he wrote my answers.  The rise of the church, priesthood, doctrines, offices, sacraments &c. were the  principle queries he advanced. When he demurred to any of our principles  I was proceeding to explain, but he cut my discourse short by saying  he would not hold any controversy, his object being only to obtain  information. After the disposal of his queries he wished to be informed  where he could obtain the whole of the publications of the Latter Day  Saints as he wished to be in possession of them; I informed him  at 47 Oxford Street, and he promised to send for them. Soon after  the visit of this reverend gentleman, I had reason to suspect that under mining operations were in progress against me, I therefore tendered my  resignation to the directors, but they would not accept it, and very  soon afterwards a public accountant was employed by them to  investigate their accounts for several years back, and I was happy  to be enabled to answer satisfactorily every question that was asked  of me respecting them.
After this another minister sent a lengthy article extracted  from an American paper, purporting to be the production of a Mr Anthony,  with a request that I would “read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest”  the same. I replied to the statements of Mr A. and after disposing of them  paragraph for paragraph. I told him that I was obliged by his favoring  me with it, inasmuch as it satisfied my mind, and was confirmatory [p. 52]
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JS, History, 1838–1856, vol. C-1, addenda, created 18 Oct.–ca. 20 Nov. 1854; 75 pages in volume bearing three labels reading “Historical Notation,” “From 1841 to 1851,” and “Addenda to C1;” handwriting of Leo Hawkins, Jonathan Grimshaw, Robert Campbell, and John L. Smith; CHL.

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