53992717

History, circa June 1839–circa 1841 [Draft 2]

tance, baptism for the remission of sins, and laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost &c &c, amongst our audience were those who had torn down our dam and who seemed wishful to give us trouble, but did not untill after the meeting was dismissed, when they immediately commenced talking to those whom they considered our friends, to try to turn them against us and our doctrines.
Amongst the many present at this meeting was one Emily Coburn

Jan. 1813–after 1900. Milliner, teacher, nurse. Born in Tioga Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Amariah Coburn and Rose Linda Lyon. Moved to Unadilla River area of Otsego Co., New York, 1818; to Greene, Chenango Co., New York, by 1820; to Guilford, Chenango ...

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sister to the wife

1804–15 Sept. 1834. Born in Oxford (later in Guilford), Chenango Co., New York. Daughter of Amariah Coburn and Rose Linda Lyon. Resided in Oxford, Chenango Co., by 1810. Moved to Greene, Chenango Co., by 1820. Moved to Colesville, Broome Co., New York, by...

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109

Sarah (Sally) Coburn Knight.  


of Newel Knight

13 Sept. 1800–11 Jan. 1847. Miller, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Knight Sr. and Polly Peck. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, ca. 1809. Moved to Windsor (later in Colesville), Broome Co., New...

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. The Revd Mr John Shearer, a divine of the presbyterian faith, who had considered himself her pastor,110

John Shearer served as pastor for the Sanford and Colesville Presbyterian churches from 1830 to 1831 with funding from the American Home Missionary Society. Shearer reported Emily Coburn’s defection from the Presbyterian church to the society’s New York office. (Hotchkin, History of the Purchase and Settlement of Western New York, 303; John Shearer, Colesville, NY, to Absalom Peters, New York City, NY, 18 Nov. 1830, in American Home Missionary Society Papers.)  


came to understand that she was likely to believe our doctrine, and had a short time previous to this, meeting, came to labor with her, but having spent some time with her without being able to persuade her against us, he endeavored to have her leave her sister

1804–15 Sept. 1834. Born in Oxford (later in Guilford), Chenango Co., New York. Daughter of Amariah Coburn and Rose Linda Lyon. Resided in Oxford, Chenango Co., by 1810. Moved to Greene, Chenango Co., by 1820. Moved to Colesville, Broome Co., New York, by...

View Full Bio
s house, and go with him to her father’s,111

Amariah Coburn.  


who lived at a distance of at least [blank] miles off: For this purpose he had recourse to stratagem; he told her that one of her brothers was waiting at a certain place, wishful to have her go home with him; he succeeded thus to get her a little distance from the house when, seeing that her brother was not in waiting for her, She refused to go any further with him; upon which he got hold of her by the arm to force her along; but her sister

1804–15 Sept. 1834. Born in Oxford (later in Guilford), Chenango Co., New York. Daughter of Amariah Coburn and Rose Linda Lyon. Resided in Oxford, Chenango Co., by 1810. Moved to Greene, Chenango Co., by 1820. Moved to Colesville, Broome Co., New York, by...

View Full Bio
, was soon with them; and the two women were too many for him and he was forced to sneak off without his errand, after all his labor and ingenuity. Nothing daunted however he went to her Father, represented to him something or other, which induced the Old Gentleman to give him a power of Attorney, which, as soon as our meeting was over, on the above named sunday evening, he immediately served upon her and carried her off to her father’s residence, by open violence, against her will. All his labor was in vain however, for the said Emily Coburn

Jan. 1813–after 1900. Milliner, teacher, nurse. Born in Tioga Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Amariah Coburn and Rose Linda Lyon. Moved to Unadilla River area of Otsego Co., New York, 1818; to Greene, Chenango Co., New York, by 1820; to Guilford, Chenango ...

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, in a short time afterwards, was baptized and confirmed, a member of the “Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.”112

Emily Coburn’s later account of these events varied from JS’s history on numerous details. According to Coburn, prior to her extended visit with Sally and Newel Knight at Colesville, she had been living at the home of her brother Esick Lyon Coburn at Sanford, about twelve miles from Colesville. An unnamed messenger found Emily among the congregation assembled at the home of Newel Knight and told her that her brother was waiting nearby to talk with her. During Coburn’s conversation with her brother, Shearer joined them and attempted to take her to her uncle, who was apparently waiting to escort her back to Sanford. After her father, who was living at Guilford, Chenango County, New York, signed a power of attorney, Coburn was returned to the home of her brother Esick at Sanford. In autumn 1830 Newel and Sally Knight obtained permission from Coburn’s parents to take her home to Colesville for another visit. Within a week of her arrival there, Coburn was baptized and confirmed. (Austin, Life among the Mormons, 30–31, 40–46, 57.)  


However, early on Monday morning we were on the alert, and before our enemies were aware we had repaired the dam, and proceeded to baptize, when the following thirteen persons were baptized under the hands of Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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viz: Emma Smith

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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, Hezekiah Peck

19 Jan. 1782–25 Aug. 1850. Millwright. Born at Guilford, Cumberland Co., New York (later in Windham Co., Vermont). Son of Joseph Peck and Elizabeth Read. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, by 1812. Married Martha Long, by 1812. Baptized...

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and wife, Joseph Knight Sr.

3 Nov. 1772–2 Feb. 1847. Farmer, miller. Born at Oakham, Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Son of Benjamin Knight and Sarah Crouch. Lived at Marlboro, Windham Co., Vermont, by 1780. Married first Polly Peck, 1795, in Windham Co. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge...

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and wife

16 Apr. 1774–7 Aug. 1831. Born in Guilford, Cumberland Co., New York (later in Windham Co., Vermont). Daughter of Joseph Peck and Elizabeth Read. Married Joseph Knight Sr., 1795, in Windham Co. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, ...

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—William Stringham and wife—Joseph Knight Jr

21 June 1808–4 Nov. 1866. Miller, carder, millwright. Born at Halifax, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Knight Sr. and Polly Peck. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, 1808. Moved to Windsor (later in Colesville), Broome Co., New...

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Aarron Aaron Culver and wife—Levi Hale Hall—Polly Knight

7 Mar. 1811–28 Apr. 1844. Born in Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York. Daughter of Joseph Knight and Polly Peck. Moved to Windsor (later in Colesville), Broome Co., New York, 1811. Baptized into LDS church by Oliver Cowdery, 28 June 1830, in...

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and Julia Stringham.—113

The women mentioned are, respectively, Martha Long Peck, Polly Peck Knight, Esther Knight Stringham, and Esther Peck Culver. These baptisms were performed on 28 June 1830 in a stream that flowed from Pickerel Pond, on the farm of Joseph Knight Sr., to the Susquehanna River. Anna Knight DeMille may also have been baptized at this time. (Berrett, Sacred Places, 2:124–125; Porter, “Colesville Branch and the Coming Forth of the Book of Mormon,” 372–373.)  


Before the baptism was entirely finished, the mob began again to collect, and shortly after we had retired, they amounted to about fifty men. They surrounded the house of Mr Knight Joseph Knight Sr.

3 Nov. 1772–2 Feb. 1847. Farmer, miller. Born at Oakham, Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Son of Benjamin Knight and Sarah Crouch. Lived at Marlboro, Windham Co., Vermont, by 1780. Married first Polly Peck, 1795, in Windham Co. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge...

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(where we had retired to) raging with anger and apparently wishful to commit violence upon us. Some asked us questions, others threatened us, so that we thought it wisdom to leave and go to the house of Newel Knight

13 Sept. 1800–11 Jan. 1847. Miller, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Knight Sr. and Polly Peck. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, ca. 1809. Moved to Windsor (later in Colesville), Broome Co., New...

View Full Bio
.
There also they followed us, and it was only by the exercise of great prudence on our part, and reliance on our heavenly Father that they were kept [p. 43]
tance, baptism for the remission of sins, and laying on of hands for the gift of the  Holy Ghost &c &c, amongst our audience were those who had torn down our dam  and who seemed wishful to give us trouble, but did not untill after the meeting was  dismissed, when they immediately commenced talking to those whom they con sidered our friends, to try to turn them against us and our doctrines.
Amongst the many present at this meeting was one Emily Coburn

Jan. 1813–after 1900. Milliner, teacher, nurse. Born in Tioga Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Amariah Coburn and Rose Linda Lyon. Moved to Unadilla River area of Otsego Co., New York, 1818; to Greene, Chenango Co., New York, by 1820; to Guilford, Chenango ...

View Full Bio
 sister to the wife

1804–15 Sept. 1834. Born in Oxford (later in Guilford), Chenango Co., New York. Daughter of Amariah Coburn and Rose Linda Lyon. Resided in Oxford, Chenango Co., by 1810. Moved to Greene, Chenango Co., by 1820. Moved to Colesville, Broome Co., New York, by...

View Full Bio
109

Sarah (Sally) Coburn Knight.  


of Newel Knight

13 Sept. 1800–11 Jan. 1847. Miller, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Knight Sr. and Polly Peck. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, ca. 1809. Moved to Windsor (later in Colesville), Broome Co., New...

View Full Bio
. The Revd Mr [John] Shearer, a divine of the  presbyterian faith, who had considered himself her pastor,110

John Shearer served as pastor for the Sanford and Colesville Presbyterian churches from 1830 to 1831 with funding from the American Home Missionary Society. Shearer reported Emily Coburn’s defection from the Presbyterian church to the society’s New York office. (Hotchkin, History of the Purchase and Settlement of Western New York, 303; John Shearer, Colesville, NY, to Absalom Peters, New York City, NY, 18 Nov. 1830, in American Home Missionary Society Papers.)  


came to understand  that she was likely to believe our doctrine, and had a short <time> previous to this,  our meeting, came to labor with her, but having spent some time with her  without being able to persuade her against us, he endeavored to have her leave  her sister

1804–15 Sept. 1834. Born in Oxford (later in Guilford), Chenango Co., New York. Daughter of Amariah Coburn and Rose Linda Lyon. Resided in Oxford, Chenango Co., by 1810. Moved to Greene, Chenango Co., by 1820. Moved to Colesville, Broome Co., New York, by...

View Full Bio
s house, and go with him to her father’s,111

Amariah Coburn.  


who lived at a distance of  at least [blank] miles off: For this purpose he had recourse to stratagem; he  told her that one of her brothers was waiting at a certain place, wishful to have  her go home with him; he succeeded thus to get her a little distance from the house  when, seeing that her brother was not in waiting for her, She refused to go any  further with him; upon which he got hold of her by the arm to force her along;  but her sister

1804–15 Sept. 1834. Born in Oxford (later in Guilford), Chenango Co., New York. Daughter of Amariah Coburn and Rose Linda Lyon. Resided in Oxford, Chenango Co., by 1810. Moved to Greene, Chenango Co., by 1820. Moved to Colesville, Broome Co., New York, by...

View Full Bio
, was soon with them; and the two women were too many for him  and he was forced to sneak off without his errand, after all his labor and in genuity. Nothing daunted however he went to her Father, represented to him  something or other, which induced the Old Gentleman to give him a power of  Attorney, which, as soon as our meeting was over, on the above named sunday  evening, he immediately served upon her and carried her off to her father’s  residence, by open violence, against her will. All his labor was in vain how ever, for the said Emily Coburn

Jan. 1813–after 1900. Milliner, teacher, nurse. Born in Tioga Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Amariah Coburn and Rose Linda Lyon. Moved to Unadilla River area of Otsego Co., New York, 1818; to Greene, Chenango Co., New York, by 1820; to Guilford, Chenango ...

View Full Bio
, in a short time afterwards, was baptized  and confirmed, a member of the “Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.”112

Emily Coburn’s later account of these events varied from JS’s history on numerous details. According to Coburn, prior to her extended visit with Sally and Newel Knight at Colesville, she had been living at the home of her brother Esick Lyon Coburn at Sanford, about twelve miles from Colesville. An unnamed messenger found Emily among the congregation assembled at the home of Newel Knight and told her that her brother was waiting nearby to talk with her. During Coburn’s conversation with her brother, Shearer joined them and attempted to take her to her uncle, who was apparently waiting to escort her back to Sanford. After her father, who was living at Guilford, Chenango County, New York, signed a power of attorney, Coburn was returned to the home of her brother Esick at Sanford. In autumn 1830 Newel and Sally Knight obtained permission from Coburn’s parents to take her home to Colesville for another visit. Within a week of her arrival there, Coburn was baptized and confirmed. (Austin, Life among the Mormons, 30–31, 40–46, 57.)  


However, early on Monday morning we were on the alert, and  before our enemies were aware we had repaired the dam, and proceeded to  baptize, when the following thirteen persons were baptized under the hands of  Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
viz: Emma Smith

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
, Hezekiah Peck

19 Jan. 1782–25 Aug. 1850. Millwright. Born at Guilford, Cumberland Co., New York (later in Windham Co., Vermont). Son of Joseph Peck and Elizabeth Read. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, by 1812. Married Martha Long, by 1812. Baptized...

View Full Bio
and wife,  Joseph Knight [Sr.]

3 Nov. 1772–2 Feb. 1847. Farmer, miller. Born at Oakham, Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Son of Benjamin Knight and Sarah Crouch. Lived at Marlboro, Windham Co., Vermont, by 1780. Married first Polly Peck, 1795, in Windham Co. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge...

View Full Bio
and wife

16 Apr. 1774–7 Aug. 1831. Born in Guilford, Cumberland Co., New York (later in Windham Co., Vermont). Daughter of Joseph Peck and Elizabeth Read. Married Joseph Knight Sr., 1795, in Windham Co. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, ...

View Full Bio
—William Stringham and wife—Joseph Knight Jr

21 June 1808–4 Nov. 1866. Miller, carder, millwright. Born at Halifax, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Knight Sr. and Polly Peck. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, 1808. Moved to Windsor (later in Colesville), Broome Co., New...

View Full Bio
 Aarron [Aaron] Culver and wife—Levi Hale [Hall]—Polly Knight

7 Mar. 1811–28 Apr. 1844. Born in Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York. Daughter of Joseph Knight and Polly Peck. Moved to Windsor (later in Colesville), Broome Co., New York, 1811. Baptized into LDS church by Oliver Cowdery, 28 June 1830, in...

View Full Bio
and Julia String ham.—113

The women mentioned are, respectively, Martha Long Peck, Polly Peck Knight, Esther Knight Stringham, and Esther Peck Culver. These baptisms were performed on 28 June 1830 in a stream that flowed from Pickerel Pond, on the farm of Joseph Knight Sr., to the Susquehanna River. Anna Knight DeMille may also have been baptized at this time. (Berrett, Sacred Places, 2:124–125; Porter, “Colesville Branch and the Coming Forth of the Book of Mormon,” 372–373.)  


Before the baptism was entirely finished, the mob began  again to collect, and shortly after we had retired, they amounted to about  fifty men. They surrounded the house of Mr Knight [Joseph Knight Sr.]

3 Nov. 1772–2 Feb. 1847. Farmer, miller. Born at Oakham, Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Son of Benjamin Knight and Sarah Crouch. Lived at Marlboro, Windham Co., Vermont, by 1780. Married first Polly Peck, 1795, in Windham Co. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge...

View Full Bio
(where we had  retired to) raging with anger and apparently wishful to commit vio lence upon us. Some asked us questions, others threatened us, so that  we thought it wisdom to leave and go to the house of Newel Knight

13 Sept. 1800–11 Jan. 1847. Miller, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Knight Sr. and Polly Peck. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, ca. 1809. Moved to Windsor (later in Colesville), Broome Co., New...

View Full Bio
.
There also they followed us, and it was only by the exercise of great  prudence on our part, and reliance on our heavenly Father that they were kept [p. 43]
PreviousNext
JS, History, [ca. June 1839–ca. 1841]; handwriting of James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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and Robert B. Thompson

1 Oct. 1811–27 Aug. 1841. Clerk, editor. Born in Great Driffield, Yorkshire, England. Member of Methodist church. Immigrated to Upper Canada, 1834. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt, May 1836, in Upper Canada. Ordained an elder by John Taylor, 22...

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; sixty-one pages; in JS History, 1838–1856, vol. A-1, CHL. Includes redactions, use marks, and archival marking.
Large blank book composed of ruled paper printed with forty horizontal lines in (now faint) blue ink. The text block includes thirty gatherings of various sizes, each about a dozen leaves per gathering, and originally had 384 interior leaves cut to measure 13⅝ × 9 inches (35 × 23 cm). The text block, which was conserved in the late twentieth century, was probably originally sewn on recessed cords and was apparently also glued on leather tapes. The binding features false bands. The endpapers were single-sided marbled leaves featuring a traditional Spanish pattern with slate blue body and veins of black and red. The block was bound to pasteboard covers, probably with a hollow-back ledger binding, making a book measuring 14¼ × 9½ × 2½ inches (36 × 24 × 6 cm). The boards were bound in brown suede calfskin. At some point, blind-tooled decorations were made around the outside border and along the board edges and the turned-in edges of the inside covers.
The volume was originally used for JS’s 1834–1836 history, comprising 154 pages.1

See Source Note for 1834–1836 history.  


It was subsequently turned upside down so the back cover became the front cover, and on the new first page, James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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began copying the history that had been begun by the church presidency in 1838. He left the first seventeen lines blank, presumably to create a large title when the work was complete, although a title was never added. Because the volume had been turned upside down, the unlined top margin became the bottom margin and there was no longer any top margin. Mulholland inscribed pages 2–19 beginning at the head of the page; then, beginning with page 20, he left the line at the top of the page blank, effectively creating a top margin. He also inscribed one line of text below the lowest printed line at the foot of the page, in the original top margin. Starting on page 13, he penciled in a horizontal line at the bottom of each page to ensure straight text on this last line. Mulholland inscribed 59 pages in all. Robert B. Thompson

1 Oct. 1811–27 Aug. 1841. Clerk, editor. Born in Great Driffield, Yorkshire, England. Member of Methodist church. Immigrated to Upper Canada, 1834. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt, May 1836, in Upper Canada. Ordained an elder by John Taylor, 22...

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, who replaced Mulholland as scribe, commenced on page 60 and wrote for sixteen pages, the first two pages of which are included in the transcript herein. Thompson maintained the blank upper margin, but instead of filling in the lower margin as Mulholland had done, he left the space blank. In addition, he created a left margin on each page by penciling in a vertical line. Both Mulholland and Thompson numbered the pages as they inscribed them. At a later time, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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inserted headings giving the year, or the month and year, narrated on each page.2

Of the excerpt transcribed here, manuscript pages 1–9, 18, 19, and 36 do not have a heading.  


The volume includes 553 pages of the history inscribed beginning in 1839, followed by sixteen pages of addenda that were recorded by Charles Wandell and Thomas Bullock. Four blank pages separate the addenda from the end of the 1834–1836 history. Multiple layers of emendations and other later marks accumulated as the history was created, revised, and published. The transcript here presents the initial text, along with only those revisions made to it by the first two scribes, Mulholland and Thompson.
With the later history’s side of the book upward, the spine of the book was at some point in time labeled as volume “A | 1” of the multivolume history. Archival stickers were also added at some point to the spine and inside front cover. Two interior leaves are now missing from the initial gathering of the volume and one leaf is missing from the final gathering. The original flyleaves and pastedowns were also removed.3

See JS History, vol. A-1, microfilm, Dec. 1971, CHL. Only one leaf of the original pastedowns and flyleaves is extant. The pastedowns were replaced with undecorated paper in 1994, according to a conservation note on the verso of the extant marbled leaf archived with the volume.  


The volume shows moderate wear, browning, water staining, and brittleness. It has been resewn, rebound, and otherwise conserved.
In the first half of the 1840s, the volume was in the possession of church scribes and printers while JS’s history was updated and prepared for publication, which was begun in the church newspaper in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, in the 15 March 1842 issue. JS maintained custody of the volume through his later life, as indicated by a note he inscribed memorializing his deceased brother Alvin Smith

11 Feb. 1798–19 Nov. 1823. Farmer, carpenter. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; returned to Tunbridge, before May 1803. Moved to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804, and to...

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, which was attached to the verso of the front flyleaf. The volume is listed in the first extant Historian’s Office inventory, made in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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in February 1846 by clerk Thomas Bullock, and it is listed in inventories of church records made in Salt Lake City in the second half of the nineteenth century.4

“Schedule of Church Records. Nauvoo 1846,” [1]; “Historian’s Office Catalogue 1858,” 2, Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


These and later archival records, as well as archival marking on the volume, indicate continuous institutional custody.

Facts