31765

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

Each pulpit consisted of four different apartments; the fourth standing on a platform raised a suitable height above the floor; the third stood directly behind and elevated a little above the fourth; the second in rear of and elevated above the third; and so was the first above the second. Each of these apartments was just large enough, and rightly calculated to receive three persons, and the breast-work in front of each of these three last mentioned, was constituted of three semi-circles, joining each other, and finished in good style. The fourth, or lower one, was straight in front, and had a table-leaf attached to it, that could be raised at pleasure, for the convenience of administering the sacrament, &c. These pulpits were alike in each end of the house

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
, and one was for the use of the Malchisedec Melchizedek, or high priesthood, and the other for the Aaronic, or lesser priesthood. The first, or higher apartment, was occupied by the first presidency over all the church; the second apartment, by the President of the high priests, and his two counsellors; the third by three of the High Priests; and the fourth by the President of the Elders, and his two counsellors.54

Heber C. Kimball later gave a largely similar description: “The first or highest apartment was occupied by the First Presidency over the whole church; the second apartment by the Melchisedek high priesthood; the third by the President of the High Priests quorum; and the fourth by the President of the Elders and his two Counsellors.” In practice, the placement of presiding authorities and speakers at the pulpits varied from meeting to meeting as their attendance varied. (Kimball, “History,” 40.)  


The highest apartment of the other pulpit was occupied by the Bishop of the church and his two counsellors; the next by the President of the priests and his two counsellors; the third by the President of the teachers and his two counsellors; and the fourth by the President of the deacons and his two counsellors.55

This arrangement of pulpits corresponded with the church hierarchy prior to the addition of apostles and seventies in February 1835. (See JS, Journal, 27 Mar. 1836.)  


Each of these apartments had curtains hanging from the ceiling, over head, down to the top of the pulpit, which could be rolled up or dropped down at pleasure; and, when dropped down, would completely exclude those within the apartment from the sight of all others.56

When enclosed by the hanging veils, the pulpits functioned as an inner sanctum analogous to the veiled “most holy house” in Solomon’s temple. (See 2 Chronicles 3:8, 14; see also JS, Journal, 29 Mar. and 3 Apr. 1836.)  


The room itself was finished with slips57

“A long seat or narrow pew in churches.” (“Slip,” in American Dictionary, 763.)  


and seats, so calculated that, by slipping the seats a little, the congregation could change their faces towards either pulpit they choose, for in some cases the high priesthood would administer, and in other cases the lesser would. The room was also divided into four apartments, by means of curtains hanging from the ceiling, over head, down to the floor, which could be rolled up at pleasure, so that the room could be used all in one, or divided into four rooms, and used for different purposes. Thus the house was constructed to suit and accommodate the different orders of priesthood and worship peculiar to the church. The first story, or lower room, was dedicated for divine worship alone. The second story was finished similar in form to the first, but was designed, wholly, for instruction, and supplied with tables instead of slips. In the roof were finished five rooms for the convenience of schools, and for the different quorums of the church to meet in, &c.
In the winter of 1834 and 5, all the principal elders in Upper Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
went to Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
. Some of them spent the Summer there, while others travelled and preached in the eastern States, and some went to the south. I was appointed to take charge of the finishing of the Lord’s house

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
.58

This appointment occurred on 15 January 1836. (JS, Journal, 15 Jan. 1836.)  


In the fall, and early part of the winter of ’35, the elders gathered in to Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
, to the number, I should think, of three or four hundred, who remained there through the winter. Schools were instituted for the use of the elders and others. Some studied grammar and other branches: they also employed the celebrated Hebrew teacher, Mr.

4 June 1802–1874. Hebraist, textbook writer, teacher. Probably born at New York City. Son of Gershom Mendez Seixas and Hannah Manuel. Married Henrietta Raphael of Richmond, Henrico Co., Virginia. Taught Hebrew at New York and Charlestown, Massachusetts. His...

View Full Bio
[p. 22]
Each pulpit consisted of four different apartments; the fourth stand ing on a platform raised a suitable height above the floor; the third  stood directly behind and elevated a little above the fourth; the second  in rear of and elevated above the third; and so was the first above  the second. Each of these apartments was just large enough, and  rightly calculated to receive three persons, and the breast-work in  front of each of these three last mentioned, was constituted of three  semi-circles, joining each other, and finished in good style. The  fourth, or lower one, was straight in front, and had a table-leaf at tached to it, that could be raised at pleasure, for the convenience  of administering the sacrament, &c. These pulpits were alike in  each end of the house

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
, and one was for the use of the Malchise dec [Melchizedek], or high priesthood, and the other for the Aaronic, or lesser  priesthood. The first, or higher apartment, was occupied by the first  presidency over all the church; the second apartment, by the Presi dent of the high priests, and his two counsellors; the third by  three of the High Priests; and the fourth by the President of the  Elders, and his two counsellors.54

Heber C. Kimball later gave a largely similar description: “The first or highest apartment was occupied by the First Presidency over the whole church; the second apartment by the Melchisedek high priesthood; the third by the President of the High Priests quorum; and the fourth by the President of the Elders and his two Counsellors.” In practice, the placement of presiding authorities and speakers at the pulpits varied from meeting to meeting as their attendance varied. (Kimball, “History,” 40.)  


The highest apartment of the  other pulpit was occupied by the Bishop of the church and his two  counsellors; the next by the President of the priests and his two coun sellors; the third by the President of the teachers and his two coun sellors; and the fourth by the President of the deacons and his two  counsellors.55

This arrangement of pulpits corresponded with the church hierarchy prior to the addition of apostles and seventies in February 1835. (See JS, Journal, 27 Mar. 1836.)  


Each of these apartments had curtains hanging from the  ceiling, over head, down to the top of the pulpit, which could be roll ed up or dropped down at pleasure; and, when dropped down, would  completely exclude those within the apartment from the sight of all  others.56

When enclosed by the hanging veils, the pulpits functioned as an inner sanctum analogous to the veiled “most holy house” in Solomon’s temple. (See 2 Chronicles 3:8, 14; see also JS, Journal, 29 Mar. and 3 Apr. 1836.)  


The room itself was finished with slips57

“A long seat or narrow pew in churches.” (“Slip,” in American Dictionary, 763.)  


and seats, so calcu lated that, by slipping the seats a little, the congregation could change  their faces towards either pulpit they choose, for in some cases the high  priesthood would administer, and in other cases the lesser would.  The room was also divided into four apartments, by means of curtains  hanging from the ceiling, over head, down to the floor, which could  be rolled up at pleasure, so that the room could be used all in one, or  divided into four rooms, and used for different purposes. Thus the  house was constructed to suit and accommodate the different orders of  priesthood and worship peculiar to the church. The first story, or  lower room, was dedicated for divine worship alone. The second  story was finished similar in form to the first, but was designed, whol ly, for instruction, and supplied with tables instead of slips. In the  roof were finished five rooms for the convenience of schools, and for  the different quorums of the church to meet in, &c.
In the winter of 1834 and 5, all the principal elders in Upper Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
 went to Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
. Some of them spent the Summer there, while others  travelled and preached in the eastern States, and some went to the south.  I was appointed to take charge of the finishing of the Lord’s house

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
.58

This appointment occurred on 15 January 1836. (JS, Journal, 15 Jan. 1836.)  


In the fall, and early part of the winter of ’35, the elders gathered  in to Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
, to the number, I should think, of three or four hundred,  who remained there through the winter. Schools were instituted for  the use of the elders and others. Some studied grammar and other  branches: they also employed the celebrated Hebrew teacher, Mr.

4 June 1802–1874. Hebraist, textbook writer, teacher. Probably born at New York City. Son of Gershom Mendez Seixas and Hannah Manuel. Married Henrietta Raphael of Richmond, Henrico Co., Virginia. Taught Hebrew at New York and Charlestown, Massachusetts. His...

View Full Bio
[p. 22]
PreviousNext
John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

View Full Bio
, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, (Commonly Called Mormons;) Including an Account of Their Doctrine and Discipline; with the Reasons of the Author for Leaving the Church, St. Louis, MO: “Printed for the Author,” 1839; two preliminary leaves, 7–50 pp.; includes typeset signature marks. The copy used for transcription is held at CHL; includes handwritten underscoring, notes, and other marks, as well as archival stamps.
This booklet was printed in octavo format on three sheets cut and folded into seven gatherings. The interior gatherings were made from half sheets folded into four leaves, and the initial and final gatherings were made from quarter sheets folded into two leaves, making a total of twenty-four leaves in the booklet. The text block measures 8½ x 5½ x ⅛ inches (22 x 14 x 0.3 cm). Examination of the copies at CHL and BYU, as well as images of a third copy,1

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints, microfilm (New Haven, CT: Research Publications, 1967).  


indicate that the booklet was originally side stitched. The binding of the copy at CHL has been altered.2

Needle holes along the center folds suggest that the CHL copy of the booklet was once bound with other similar-size works. The first page of the booklet bears the faded and now faint pencil notation “No 2.” on the upper right corner, a possible indication of the booklet’s arrangement in a collection of tracts. The first page of the booklet also bears a handwritten “20” in ink below the title. A photocopy made in 1971 or earlier shows that the CHL copy was not intact at that time. The copy at CHL is currently sewn through a new set of holes in the center folds. (Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


It appears to have been in church custody since at least the early 1880s.3

A circa 1881–1884 inventory of printed works at the Church Historian’s Office includes Corrill’s booklet. The copy held at CHL bears the extremely faded inscription “Historian’s Office” and includes purple Historian’s Office stamps, which were in use as early as the late nineteenth century. A circa 1971 photocopy shows a “Historian’s Office Library” adhesive label (since removed) on page 2 of the CHL copy. These archival records and marks indicate continuous church custody since the early 1880s. (“Church Works, Periodicals, and Pamphlets, Alphabetically Arranged,” 22, Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


Facts