31765

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

goods, and, shortly after, some fifty or sixty thousand more, as I was informed;77

Complete records of purchases and debts of church entities in Kirtland are not extant. Debts incurred during this period that were subsequently litigated included at least $34,000 for which JS was defendant and at least $13,000 for which members of the temple committee were defendants. (Madsen, “Impact of Litigation against Joseph Smith and Others on the Kirtland Economy.”)  


but they did not fully understand the mercantile business, and, withal, they suffered pride to arise in their hearts, and became desirous of fine houses, and fine clothes, and indulged too much in these things, supposing for a few months that they were very rich.78

In June 1837, Warren Cowdery wrote in the Messenger and Advocate, “The starting up, as if by magic, of buildings in every direction around us, were evincive to us of buoyant hope, lively anticipation, and a firm confidence that our days of pinching adversity had passed by.” He indicated that land prices increased eight hundred percent in one year “and in many cases more.” Heber C. Kimball later echoed Corrill’s observations about the changed outlook in Kirtland, recalling circumstances before and after his June–October 1836 mission to New York and Vermont: “We were much grieved to see the spirit of speculation that was prevailing in the church; trade and traffic seemed to engross the time and attention of the Saints: when we left Kirtland a City lot was worth about 150 dollars but on our return to our astonishment the same lot was said to be worth from 500 to 1000 dollars according to location; and some men who when I left could hardly get food to eat, I found on my return to be men of supposed great wealth; in fact every thing in the place seemed to be moving in great prosperity, and all seemed determined to become rich.” ([Warren Cowdery], Editorial, LDS Messenger and Advocate, June 1837, 3:520–522; Kimball, “History,” 47.)  


They also spent some thousands of dollars in building a steam mill, which never profited them anything.79

Joel Johnson built a sawmill just off Stony Brook in November 1833; after the House of the Lord was largely completed, the mill was modified to operate by steam power. Existing records do not disclose the cost of the modifications. (Johnson, Reminiscences and Journals, vol. 1, p. 18; [Warren Cowdery], “To the Saints Abroad,” LDS Messenger and Advocate, July 1836, 2:349; see also Staker, Hearken, O Ye People, 421–422, 426–428.)  


They also bought many farms at extravagant prices, and made part payments, which they afterwards lost, by not being able to meet the remaining payments. They also got up a bank, for which they could get no charter, so they issued their paper without a charter, and, of course, they could not collect their pay on notes received for loans, and, after struggling with it awhile, they broke down.80

The failure of the Kirtland Safety Society, which JS promoted as a catalyst for local development, hampered growth of the Kirtland economy in advance of the nationwide panic of 1837. The “anti-bank” (as it was called after failing to secure a charter) was established in January 1837 and suspended payments in specie later that month. It essentially failed long before its official closure in November. (See Hill et al., Kirtland Economy Revisited, 41–70; and Adams, “Chartering the Kirtland Bank,” 467–482.)  


During their mercantile and banking operations they not only indulged in pride, but also suffered jealousies to arise among them, and several persons dissented from the church, and accused the leaders of the church with bad management, selfishness, seeking for riches, honor, and dominion, tyranising over the people, and striving constantly after power and property. On the other hand, the leaders of the church accused the dissenters with dishonesty, want of faith, and righteousness, wicked in their intentions, guilty of crimes, such as stealing, lying, encouraging the making of counterfeit money, &c.; and this strife or opposition arose to a great height, so that, instead of pulling together as brethren, they tried every way in their power, seemingly, to destroy each other; their enemies from without rejoiced at this, and assisted the dissenters what they could, until Smith and Rigden Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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finally were obliged to leave Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, and, with their families, came to Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, in March or April, 1838.81

JS arrived in Far West 14 March; Rigdon was delayed until 4 April. (JS, Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838, [undated entry]; JS History, vol. B-1, 786; for a close analysis of this period of turmoil and dissent in Kirtland, see Esplin, “Emergence of Brigham Young,” chaps. 5–6; and Parkin, “Conflict at Kirtland,” chap. 10.)  


During this strife some of the elders became tired of this scene, and left Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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; Parley P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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went to the city of New York

Dutch founded New Netherland colony, 1625. Incorporated under British control and renamed New York, 1664. Harbor contributed to economic and population growth of city; became largest city in American colonies. British troops defeated Continental Army under...

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, where he built up a church.82

The incomplete phrase “and published” appears at this point in the manuscript version of Corrill’s history. The remainder of the sentence was cut from the top of the next manuscript page to allow for the pasting in of the heading to chapter 15. Pratt left Kirtland for Missouri, but en route he was persuaded by Thomas B. Marsh and David W. Patten to return to Kirtland, where he and JS were reconciled prior to Pratt’s departure on a proselytizing mission to New York. While in New York, Pratt published the first edition of A Voice of Warning and Instruction to All People: Containing a Declaration of the Faith and Doctrine of the Church of the Latter Day Saints, Commonly Called Mormons (New York : W. Sandford, 1837). (Pratt, Autobiography, 183–184; Mary Fielding, Kirtland, OH, to Mercy Fielding Thompson, 8 July 1837, Mary Fielding Smith Collection, CHL; see also Esplin, “Emergence of Brigham Young,” 283–288.)  


Chapter 15

CHAPTER XV.
 
Debts, how paid—Difficulty in the church—Smith and Rigden

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
visit the church—Presidency changed—Dissenters withdraw—Removal to Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
—New town commenced, called Adamondiawman

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

More Info
—Feelings produced—Boasting—Settlement of Dewit

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

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.
 
In order to pay the debts in New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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, and elsewhere, many of the church in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
turned out their farms and stripped themselves of property, took orders on the bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
,83

Between February and April 1838, at least twenty church members transferred their Ohio property to William Marks as agent of JS and Sidney Rigdon. In exchange, these church members received notes ordering Missouri bishop Edward Partridge to compensate them with money or land. (“List of Demands on J Smith & S. Rigdon,” 1 Feb.–19 Apr. 1838, JS Collection, CHL; see also, for example, Draft, JS and Sidney Rigdon per William Marks, Kirtland, OH, to Edward Partridge, 21 Feb. 1838, JS Collection, CHL.)  


and, in their poverty followed Smith and Rigden Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
to Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
as soon as practicable. Some of the dissenters came also, and, notwithstanding they affected a sort of reconciliation of their difficulties, yet it was plain that hard feelings existed. William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

View Full Bio
and John Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

View Full Bio
had served as presidents of the church, in the upper country, from the time they came from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
, but some time in the winter of 1836 [p. 27]
goods, and, shortly after, some fifty or sixty thousand more, as I was  informed;77

Complete records of purchases and debts of church entities in Kirtland are not extant. Debts incurred during this period that were subsequently litigated included at least $34,000 for which JS was defendant and at least $13,000 for which members of the temple committee were defendants. (Madsen, “Impact of Litigation against Joseph Smith and Others on the Kirtland Economy.”)  


but they did not fully understand the mercantile business,  and, withal, they suffered pride to arise in their hearts, and became  desirous of fine houses, and fine clothes, and indulged too much in  these things, supposing for a few months that they were very rich.78

In June 1837, Warren Cowdery wrote in the Messenger and Advocate, “The starting up, as if by magic, of buildings in every direction around us, were evincive to us of buoyant hope, lively anticipation, and a firm confidence that our days of pinching adversity had passed by.” He indicated that land prices increased eight hundred percent in one year “and in many cases more.” Heber C. Kimball later echoed Corrill’s observations about the changed outlook in Kirtland, recalling circumstances before and after his June–October 1836 mission to New York and Vermont: “We were much grieved to see the spirit of speculation that was prevailing in the church; trade and traffic seemed to engross the time and attention of the Saints: when we left Kirtland a City lot was worth about 150 dollars but on our return to our astonishment the same lot was said to be worth from 500 to 1000 dollars according to location; and some men who when I left could hardly get food to eat, I found on my return to be men of supposed great wealth; in fact every thing in the place seemed to be moving in great prosperity, and all seemed determined to become rich.” ([Warren Cowdery], Editorial, LDS Messenger and Advocate, June 1837, 3:520–522; Kimball, “History,” 47.)  


 They also spent some thousands of dollars in building a steam mill,  which never profited them anything.79

Joel Johnson built a sawmill just off Stony Brook in November 1833; after the House of the Lord was largely completed, the mill was modified to operate by steam power. Existing records do not disclose the cost of the modifications. (Johnson, Reminiscences and Journals, vol. 1, p. 18; [Warren Cowdery], “To the Saints Abroad,” LDS Messenger and Advocate, July 1836, 2:349; see also Staker, Hearken, O Ye People, 421–422, 426–428.)  


They also bought many farms  at extravagant prices, and made part payments, which they after wards lost, by not being able to meet the remaining payments. They  also got up a bank, for which they could get no charter, so they is sued their paper without a charter, and, of course, they could not col lect their pay on notes received for loans, and, after struggling with  it awhile, they broke down.80

The failure of the Kirtland Safety Society, which JS promoted as a catalyst for local development, hampered growth of the Kirtland economy in advance of the nationwide panic of 1837. The “anti-bank” (as it was called after failing to secure a charter) was established in January 1837 and suspended payments in specie later that month. It essentially failed long before its official closure in November. (See Hill et al., Kirtland Economy Revisited, 41–70; and Adams, “Chartering the Kirtland Bank,” 467–482.)  


During their mercantile and banking operations they not only in dulged in pride, but also suffered jealousies to arise among them, and  several persons dissented from the church, and accused the leaders of  the church with bad management, selfishness, seeking for riches,  honor, and dominion, tyranising over the people, and striving con stantly after power and property. On the other hand, the leaders of  the church accused the dissenters with dishonesty, want of faith, and  righteousness, wicked in their intentions, guilty of crimes, such as  stealing, lying, encouraging the making of counterfeit money, &c.; and  this strife or opposition arose to a great height, so that, instead of pul ling together as brethren, they tried every way in their power, seem ingly, to destroy each other; their enemies from without rejoiced at  this, and assisted the dissenters what they could, until Smith and Rig den [Sidney Rigdon]

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
finally were obliged to leave Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
, and, with their families,  came to Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, in March or April, 1838.81

JS arrived in Far West 14 March; Rigdon was delayed until 4 April. (JS, Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838, [undated entry]; JS History, vol. B-1, 786; for a close analysis of this period of turmoil and dissent in Kirtland, see Esplin, “Emergence of Brigham Young,” chaps. 5–6; and Parkin, “Conflict at Kirtland,” chap. 10.)  


During this strife some of the elders became tired of this scene, and  left Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
; P[arley] P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
went to the city of New York

Dutch founded New Netherland colony, 1625. Incorporated under British control and renamed New York, 1664. Harbor contributed to economic and population growth of city; became largest city in American colonies. British troops defeated Continental Army under...

More Info
, where he  built up a church.82

The incomplete phrase “and published” appears at this point in the manuscript version of Corrill’s history. The remainder of the sentence was cut from the top of the next manuscript page to allow for the pasting in of the heading to chapter 15. Pratt left Kirtland for Missouri, but en route he was persuaded by Thomas B. Marsh and David W. Patten to return to Kirtland, where he and JS were reconciled prior to Pratt’s departure on a proselytizing mission to New York. While in New York, Pratt published the first edition of A Voice of Warning and Instruction to All People: Containing a Declaration of the Faith and Doctrine of the Church of the Latter Day Saints, Commonly Called Mormons (New York : W. Sandford, 1837). (Pratt, Autobiography, 183–184; Mary Fielding, Kirtland, OH, to Mercy Fielding Thompson, 8 July 1837, Mary Fielding Smith Collection, CHL; see also Esplin, “Emergence of Brigham Young,” 283–288.)  


Chapter 15

CHAPTER XV.
 
Debts, how paid—Difficulty in the church—Smith and Rigden

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
visit the church— Presidency changed—Dissenters withdraw—Removal to Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
—New town  commenced, called Adamondiawman

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

More Info
—Feelings produced—Boasting—Settlement  of Dewit

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

More Info
.
 
In order to pay the debts in New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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, and elsewhere, many of the  church in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
turned out their farms and stripped themselves of  property, took orders on the bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
,83

Between February and April 1838, at least twenty church members transferred their Ohio property to William Marks as agent of JS and Sidney Rigdon. In exchange, these church members received notes ordering Missouri bishop Edward Partridge to compensate them with money or land. (“List of Demands on J Smith & S. Rigdon,” 1 Feb.–19 Apr. 1838, JS Collection, CHL; see also, for example, Draft, JS and Sidney Rigdon per William Marks, Kirtland, OH, to Edward Partridge, 21 Feb. 1838, JS Collection, CHL.)  


and, in their po verty followed Smith and Rigden [Sidney Rigdon]

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
to Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
as soon as practi cable. Some of the dissenters came also, and, notwithstanding they  affected a sort of reconciliation of their difficulties, yet it was plain  that hard feelings existed. W[illiam] W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

View Full Bio
and John Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

View Full Bio
had  served as presidents of the church, in the upper country, from the  time they came from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
, but some time in the winter of 1836 [p. 27]
PreviousNext
John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, (Commonly Called Mormons;) Including an Account of Their Doctrine and Discipline; with the Reasons of the Author for Leaving the Church, St. Louis, MO: “Printed for the Author,” 1839; two preliminary leaves, 7–50 pp.; includes typeset signature marks. The copy used for transcription is held at CHL; includes handwritten underscoring, notes, and other marks, as well as archival stamps.
This booklet was printed in octavo format on three sheets cut and folded into seven gatherings. The interior gatherings were made from half sheets folded into four leaves, and the initial and final gatherings were made from quarter sheets folded into two leaves, making a total of twenty-four leaves in the booklet. The text block measures 8½ x 5½ x ⅛ inches (22 x 14 x 0.3 cm). Examination of the copies at CHL and BYU, as well as images of a third copy,1

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints, microfilm (New Haven, CT: Research Publications, 1967).  


indicate that the booklet was originally side stitched. The binding of the copy at CHL has been altered.2

Needle holes along the center folds suggest that the CHL copy of the booklet was once bound with other similar-size works. The first page of the booklet bears the faded and now faint pencil notation “No 2.” on the upper right corner, a possible indication of the booklet’s arrangement in a collection of tracts. The first page of the booklet also bears a handwritten “20” in ink below the title. A photocopy made in 1971 or earlier shows that the CHL copy was not intact at that time. The copy at CHL is currently sewn through a new set of holes in the center folds. (Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


It appears to have been in church custody since at least the early 1880s.3

A circa 1881–1884 inventory of printed works at the Church Historian’s Office includes Corrill’s booklet. The copy held at CHL bears the extremely faded inscription “Historian’s Office” and includes purple Historian’s Office stamps, which were in use as early as the late nineteenth century. A circa 1971 photocopy shows a “Historian’s Office Library” adhesive label (since removed) on page 2 of the CHL copy. These archival records and marks indicate continuous church custody since the early 1880s. (“Church Works, Periodicals, and Pamphlets, Alphabetically Arranged,” 22, Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


Facts