31765

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

it was reported in Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

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that the time was set for them to burn that place, and many left it for a short time; but this, I think, was incorrect.136

Albert P. Rockwood wrote that a company of ten Latter-day Saint men were employed as spies. Austin A. King reported to Governor Lilburn W. Boggs that in addition to the Danites, “there is another band of twelve, called the destructives, whose duty it is to watch the movements of men and of communities, & to avenge themselves for supposed wrongful movements against them, by privately burning houses, property, & even laying in ashes towns &c.” Other Missourians informed General John B. Clark that the Mormons intended to burn Richmond. (Rockwood, Journal, 22 Oct. 1838; Austin A. King, Richmond, MO, to [Lilburn W. Boggs], 24 Oct. 1838, copy; Wiley C. Williams and Amos Rees, to John B. Clark, 25 Oct. 1838; Sashel Woods and Joseph Dickson, Carrollton, MO, to [John B. Clark], 24 Oct. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


Shortly after the Mormon troops came from Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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, they received news that a company was gathered on Crooked river

Located in northwest Missouri. Rises in Clinton Co. and flows about sixty miles southeast through Caldwell and Ray counties; drains into Missouri River. Saints settled mainly on northwestern and southeastern sections of river, by 1835; main settlement also...

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, and that some of them had been to some houses on Log creek, in Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, and ordered off the families, with severe threats if they were not off by sunrise the next morning. They took away their arms, and, it was said, also burnt a wagon and a house, and took three men prisoners. On receiving this news, a company was fitted out to disperse them. Capt. Fear-not (David W. Pattent Patten

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

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) commanded them. They went in the night to the house of Fields John Field,137

Baugh, “Call to Arms,” 229.  


on Crooked river

Located in northwest Missouri. Rises in Clinton Co. and flows about sixty miles southeast through Caldwell and Ray counties; drains into Missouri River. Saints settled mainly on northwestern and southeastern sections of river, by 1835; main settlement also...

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, but not finding the company there they proceeded to another place, and had not proceeded far till they met with a centinel, who hailed them, and after a word or two shot one of them138

Patrick (or Patterson) Obanion. (Young, “Lorenzo Dow Young’s Narrative,” 51; John P. Greene, Affidavit, Quincy, IL, 17 Mar. 1840, Mormon Redress Petitions, 1839–1845, CHL; John L. Lockhart, Testimony, Richmond, MO, Nov. 1838, State of Missouri v. JS et al. for Treason and Other Crimes [Mo. 5th Cir. Ct. 1838], in State of Missouri, “Evidence.”)  


down, and then ran to his company; but they followed him up in a hurry, and after a fire or two, charged on the company, and soon dispersed them, and supposed they had killed several. They then gathered up a part of the plunder, and about thirty horses, and returned, leaving one of their men139

Gideon Carter. (Rockwood, Journal, 28 Oct. 1838; Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 36 [also in “History, of the Persecution,” June 1840, 1:114].)  


dead on the ground, though they did not miss him till they had got home. Three or four others were badly wounded, and Pattent

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

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and one other died soon. One of the opposite party was killed and others wounded.
This battle produced great excitement among the people, and the Mormons found in a day or two that it was militia instead of a mob that they had assailed. Captain Bogard Samuel Bogart

2 Apr. 1797–11 Mar. 1861. Preacher, military officer, farmer. Born in Carter Co., Tennessee. Son of Cornelius Bogart and Elizabeth Moffett. Served in War of 1812. Married Rachel Hammer, 19 May 1818, in Washington Co., Tennessee. Moved to Illinois and became...

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had collected a company and got permission to guard Buncum,140

Citing the need to protect Buncombe, a settlement in the noncounty area between Caldwell and Ray counties, Bogart requested and obtained orders from Major General David R. Atchison to patrol the border area between Ray and Caldwell. Bogart later testified that he read his orders from Atchison to several Mormons on the evening of 24 October. (Samuel Bogart, Elkhorn, MO, to David R. Atchison, [Liberty, MO], 23 Oct. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA; David R. Atchison, Liberty, MO, to Samuel Bogart, 23 Oct. 1838, in Samuel Bogart, Testimony, Richmond, MO, Nov. 1838, State of Missouri v. JS et al. for Treason and Other Crimes [Mo. 5th Cir. Ct. 1838], in State of Missouri, “Evidence.”)  


and was there encamped for that purpose when they fell on him. The excitement increased rapidly, and in a day or two the whole country, seemingly, was in arms. At this I was greatly alarmed, for I expected the people would turn out enmasse against Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, without order or regulation, and massacre and destroy without mercy, and that nothing could stop them. I tried to contrive some plan to get away with my family, but I could not effect it. Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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, Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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, and some others, made their escape in the night, with their families, but were followed the next day by twenty horsemen from Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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without success.141

Contrary to the order of events presented here, Marsh and Hyde left Far West before the 25 October battle at Crooked River. (Thomas B. Marsh and Orson Hyde, Affidavit, Richmond, MO, 24 Oct. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA; Thomas B. Marsh and Orson Hyde, Richmond, MO, to Lewis and Ann Marsh Abbott, 25 Oct. 1838, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 18–19.)  


The Mormons were still collected at Adamondiaman Adam-ondi-Ahman

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

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and at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, and a small company also collected at Hawn’s Mill, who lived in that section of country.142

Corrill’s spelling of Hawn with a w is supported by contemporaneous records.  


General Atchinson David R. Atchison

11 Aug. 1807–26 Jan. 1886. Lawyer, judge, agriculturist, politician, farmer. Born at Frogtown, near Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of William Atchison and Catherine Allen. About 1830, moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Missouri, where he became a prominent...

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seeing the tumult and uproar, called out the militia.143

Atchison and Samuel D. Lucas informed Governor Lilburn W. Boggs on 28 October that in response to recent Mormon “outrages” that made civil war inevitable, they had mobilized about two thousand troops to “keep them in check.” (David R. Atchison and Samuel D. Lucas, Richmond, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 28 Oct. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


The news of this pleased me, for I thought that if they turned out under authority they would of course observe good order; and it was also stated that General Atchinson

11 Aug. 1807–26 Jan. 1886. Lawyer, judge, agriculturist, politician, farmer. Born at Frogtown, near Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of William Atchison and Catherine Allen. About 1830, moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Missouri, where he became a prominent...

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’s object was to investigate the affair, and bring the guilty to punishment, and rescue the innocent. I was informed that the Mormons at Hawn’s mill made a covenant with the other citizens to let each other alone, and the Mormons were to remain at the mill.144

Several such agreements were made between the Latter-day Saints at Hawn’s Mill and settlers nearby in eastern Caldwell County and in Livingston County. (Baugh, “Call to Arms,” 261–262.)  


But in a short time two or three companies of militia came upon them, from what cause I know not.145

In the wake of the Mormon assaults in Daviess County and the Crooked River battle, it was rumored that the Mormons intended to attack a number of communities. Charles H. Ashby, a representative of Livingston County in the Missouri legislature, said that the otherwise unprovoked attack on the Hawn’s Mill settlement was a preemptive move for self-defense. (“Letter from the Editor,” Missouri Republican [St. Louis], 24 Dec. 1838, [2].)  


A battle was the result, and some twenty or thirty Mormons were killed,146

Seventeen Mormons, some of them children, were killed in the one-sided surprise attack on Hawn’s Mill 30 October 1838: Hiram Abbot, Elias Benner, John Byers, Alexander Campbell, Simon Cox, Josiah Fuller, Austin Hammer, John Lee, Benjamin Lewis, Thomas McBride, Charles Merrick, Levi N. Merrick, William Napier, George S. Richards, Sardius Smith, Warren Smith, and John York. (Baugh, “Call to Arms,” appendixes I–J; for eyewitness accounts of the attack, see “History, of the Persecution,” Aug. 1840, 1:145–150.)  


but none of the militia, as I heard, but some wounded. There were different reports about the number killed, but [p. 39]
it was reported in Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

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that the time was set for them to burn  that place, and many left it for a short time; but this, I think, was  incorrect.136

Albert P. Rockwood wrote that a company of ten Latter-day Saint men were employed as spies. Austin A. King reported to Governor Lilburn W. Boggs that in addition to the Danites, “there is another band of twelve, called the destructives, whose duty it is to watch the movements of men and of communities, & to avenge themselves for supposed wrongful movements against them, by privately burning houses, property, & even laying in ashes towns &c.” Other Missourians informed General John B. Clark that the Mormons intended to burn Richmond. (Rockwood, Journal, 22 Oct. 1838; Austin A. King, Richmond, MO, to [Lilburn W. Boggs], 24 Oct. 1838, copy; Wiley C. Williams and Amos Rees, to John B. Clark, 25 Oct. 1838; Sashel Woods and Joseph Dickson, Carrollton, MO, to [John B. Clark], 24 Oct. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


Shortly after the Mormon troops came from Davies[s]

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
, they received  news that a company was gathered on Crooked river

Located in northwest Missouri. Rises in Clinton Co. and flows about sixty miles southeast through Caldwell and Ray counties; drains into Missouri River. Saints settled mainly on northwestern and southeastern sections of river, by 1835; main settlement also...

More Info
, and that some  of them had been to some houses on Log creek, in Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
, and or dered off the families, with severe threats if they were not off by sun rise the next morning. They took away their arms, and, it was said,  also burnt a wagon and a house, and took three men prisoners. On  receiving this news, a company was fitted out to disperse them. Capt.  Fear-not (David W. Pattent [Patten]

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

View Full Bio
) commanded them. They went in the  night to the house of Fields [John Field],137

Baugh, “Call to Arms,” 229.  


on Crooked river

Located in northwest Missouri. Rises in Clinton Co. and flows about sixty miles southeast through Caldwell and Ray counties; drains into Missouri River. Saints settled mainly on northwestern and southeastern sections of river, by 1835; main settlement also...

More Info
, but not finding the  company there they proceeded to another place, and had not pro ceeded far till they met with a centinel, who hailed them, and after  a word or two shot one of them138

Patrick (or Patterson) Obanion. (Young, “Lorenzo Dow Young’s Narrative,” 51; John P. Greene, Affidavit, Quincy, IL, 17 Mar. 1840, Mormon Redress Petitions, 1839–1845, CHL; John L. Lockhart, Testimony, Richmond, MO, Nov. 1838, State of Missouri v. JS et al. for Treason and Other Crimes [Mo. 5th Cir. Ct. 1838], in State of Missouri, “Evidence.”)  


down, and then ran to his company;  but they followed him up in a hurry, and after a fire or two, charged  on the company, and soon dispersed them, and supposed they had  killed several. They then gathered up a part of the plunder, and  about thirty horses, and returned, leaving one of their men139

Gideon Carter. (Rockwood, Journal, 28 Oct. 1838; Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 36 [also in “History, of the Persecution,” June 1840, 1:114].)  


dead on  the ground, though they did not miss him till they had got home.  Three or four others were badly wounded, and Pattent

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

View Full Bio
and one other  died soon. One of the opposite party was killed and others wound ed.
This battle produced great excitement among the people, and the  Mormons found in a day or two that it was militia instead of a mob that  they had assailed. Captain Bogard [Samuel Bogart]

2 Apr. 1797–11 Mar. 1861. Preacher, military officer, farmer. Born in Carter Co., Tennessee. Son of Cornelius Bogart and Elizabeth Moffett. Served in War of 1812. Married Rachel Hammer, 19 May 1818, in Washington Co., Tennessee. Moved to Illinois and became...

View Full Bio
had collected a company and got  permission to guard Buncum,140

Citing the need to protect Buncombe, a settlement in the noncounty area between Caldwell and Ray counties, Bogart requested and obtained orders from Major General David R. Atchison to patrol the border area between Ray and Caldwell. Bogart later testified that he read his orders from Atchison to several Mormons on the evening of 24 October. (Samuel Bogart, Elkhorn, MO, to David R. Atchison, [Liberty, MO], 23 Oct. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA; David R. Atchison, Liberty, MO, to Samuel Bogart, 23 Oct. 1838, in Samuel Bogart, Testimony, Richmond, MO, Nov. 1838, State of Missouri v. JS et al. for Treason and Other Crimes [Mo. 5th Cir. Ct. 1838], in State of Missouri, “Evidence.”)  


and was there encamped for that pur pose when they fell on him. The excitement increased rapidly, and  in a day or two the whole country, seemingly, was in arms. At this  I was greatly alarmed, for I expected the people would turn out en masse against Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, without order or regulation, and massacre  and destroy without mercy, and that nothing could stop them. I tried  to contrive some plan to get away with my family, but I could not  effect it. T[homas] B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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, O[rson] Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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, and some others, made their escape  in the night, with their families, but were followed the next day by  twenty horsemen from Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
without success.141

Contrary to the order of events presented here, Marsh and Hyde left Far West before the 25 October battle at Crooked River. (Thomas B. Marsh and Orson Hyde, Affidavit, Richmond, MO, 24 Oct. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA; Thomas B. Marsh and Orson Hyde, Richmond, MO, to Lewis and Ann Marsh Abbott, 25 Oct. 1838, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 18–19.)  


The Mormons were still collected at Adamondiaman [Adam-ondi-Ahman]

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

More Info
and at Far  West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, and a small company also collected at Hawn’s Mill, who lived  in that section of country.142

Corrill’s spelling of Hawn with a w is supported by contemporaneous records.  


General Atchinson [David R. Atchison]

11 Aug. 1807–26 Jan. 1886. Lawyer, judge, agriculturist, politician, farmer. Born at Frogtown, near Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of William Atchison and Catherine Allen. About 1830, moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Missouri, where he became a prominent...

View Full Bio
seeing the tumult and  uproar, called out the militia.143

Atchison and Samuel D. Lucas informed Governor Lilburn W. Boggs on 28 October that in response to recent Mormon “outrages” that made civil war inevitable, they had mobilized about two thousand troops to “keep them in check.” (David R. Atchison and Samuel D. Lucas, Richmond, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 28 Oct. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


The news of this pleased me, for I  thought that if they turned out under authority they would of course  observe good order; and it was also stated that General Atchinson

11 Aug. 1807–26 Jan. 1886. Lawyer, judge, agriculturist, politician, farmer. Born at Frogtown, near Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of William Atchison and Catherine Allen. About 1830, moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Missouri, where he became a prominent...

View Full Bio
’s  object was to investigate the affair, and bring the guilty to punish ment, and rescue the innocent. I was informed that the Mormons at  Hawn’s mill made a covenant with the other citizens to let each other  alone, and the Mormons were to remain at the mill.144

Several such agreements were made between the Latter-day Saints at Hawn’s Mill and settlers nearby in eastern Caldwell County and in Livingston County. (Baugh, “Call to Arms,” 261–262.)  


But in a short  time two or three companies of militia came upon them, from what  cause I know not.145

In the wake of the Mormon assaults in Daviess County and the Crooked River battle, it was rumored that the Mormons intended to attack a number of communities. Charles H. Ashby, a representative of Livingston County in the Missouri legislature, said that the otherwise unprovoked attack on the Hawn’s Mill settlement was a preemptive move for self-defense. (“Letter from the Editor,” Missouri Republican [St. Louis], 24 Dec. 1838, [2].)  


A battle was the result, and some twenty or thir ty Mormons were killed,146

Seventeen Mormons, some of them children, were killed in the one-sided surprise attack on Hawn’s Mill 30 October 1838: Hiram Abbot, Elias Benner, John Byers, Alexander Campbell, Simon Cox, Josiah Fuller, Austin Hammer, John Lee, Benjamin Lewis, Thomas McBride, Charles Merrick, Levi N. Merrick, William Napier, George S. Richards, Sardius Smith, Warren Smith, and John York. (Baugh, “Call to Arms,” appendixes I–J; for eyewitness accounts of the attack, see “History, of the Persecution,” Aug. 1840, 1:145–150.)  


but none of the militia, as I heard, but some  wounded. There were different reports about the number killed, but [p. 39]
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John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, (Commonly Called Mormons;) Including an Account of Their Doctrine and Discipline; with the Reasons of the Author for Leaving the Church, St. Louis, MO: “Printed for the Author,” 1839; two preliminary leaves, 7–50 pp.; includes typeset signature marks. The copy used for transcription is held at CHL; includes handwritten underscoring, notes, and other marks, as well as archival stamps.
This booklet was printed in octavo format on three sheets cut and folded into seven gatherings. The interior gatherings were made from half sheets folded into four leaves, and the initial and final gatherings were made from quarter sheets folded into two leaves, making a total of twenty-four leaves in the booklet. The text block measures 8½ x 5½ x ⅛ inches (22 x 14 x 0.3 cm). Examination of the copies at CHL and BYU, as well as images of a third copy,1

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints, microfilm (New Haven, CT: Research Publications, 1967).  


indicate that the booklet was originally side stitched. The binding of the copy at CHL has been altered.2

Needle holes along the center folds suggest that the CHL copy of the booklet was once bound with other similar-size works. The first page of the booklet bears the faded and now faint pencil notation “No 2.” on the upper right corner, a possible indication of the booklet’s arrangement in a collection of tracts. The first page of the booklet also bears a handwritten “20” in ink below the title. A photocopy made in 1971 or earlier shows that the CHL copy was not intact at that time. The copy at CHL is currently sewn through a new set of holes in the center folds. (Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


It appears to have been in church custody since at least the early 1880s.3

A circa 1881–1884 inventory of printed works at the Church Historian’s Office includes Corrill’s booklet. The copy held at CHL bears the extremely faded inscription “Historian’s Office” and includes purple Historian’s Office stamps, which were in use as early as the late nineteenth century. A circa 1971 photocopy shows a “Historian’s Office Library” adhesive label (since removed) on page 2 of the CHL copy. These archival records and marks indicate continuous church custody since the early 1880s. (“Church Works, Periodicals, and Pamphlets, Alphabetically Arranged,” 22, Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


Facts