31765

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

was sent to Adamondiaman Adam-ondi-Ahman

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

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, where were about one hundred and fifty armed Mormons, who surrendered to him and gave up their arms.168

This surrender occurred on 9 November 1838.  


The five prisoners who first surrendered, together with Amasa Lyman

30 Mar. 1813–4 Feb. 1877. Boatman, gunsmith, farmer. Born at Lyman, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Son of Boswell Lyman and Martha Mason. Baptized into LDS church by Lyman E. Johnson, 27 Apr. 1832. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, May–June 1832. Ordained an...

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and Hiram Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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, who had been added to them, remained in the camp until Friday morning,169

2 November 1838.  


when Gen. Moses Wilson

1795–ca. 1868. Farmer, merchant, land developer, postmaster. Born in Virginia. Moved to Greene Co., Tennessee, by Dec. 1818. Married first Margaret Guin, 23 Dec. 1829, in Greene Co. Moved to Pike Co., Illinois, by Apr. 1832. Served in Black Hawk War, 1832...

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, of Jackson

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, started with the prisoners and arms to Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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.170

Lucas ordered Wilson to escort the prisoners to Lucas’s headquarters at Independence. (Samuel D. Lucas, “near Far West,” to Lilburn W. Boggs, 2 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


The troops were then discharged, except a guard around town.

Chapter 25

CHAPTER XXV.
 
Arrival of Gen. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
—Number of his troops—Prisoners selected—Marched to Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

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—Investigation—Prisoners retained—Charges against them—Conduct of the soldiers—Prisoner killed—Property taken by citizens—Appropriation—Petition of Mormons.
 
On Saturday evening or Sunday morning, Gen. John B. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
arrived with fourteen hundred mounted men, and said there were six thousand more within a day’s march, but they were turned back.171

Clark arrived at Far West on Sunday, 4 November 1838. He led a force of approximately sixteen hundred. (John B. Clark, Richmond, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 10 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA; History of Caldwell and Livingston Counties, Missouri, 140.)  


Previous to the arrival of Gen. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
, the Mormons were gathered together and about five hundred made to sign a deed of trust, in which five commissioners were appointed,172

The commissioners were William Collins of Jackson County, G. W. Woodward of Ray County, Elisha Cameron of Clay County, and John Corrill and Morris Phelps of Far West, Caldwell County. (Samuel D. Lucas, Independence, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 5 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


to whom they deeded all their property in trust for the use of all the creditors of the church, and also to pay all the damages done by the Danites, and the overplus, if any, was to be refunded. Gen. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
ratified what Gen. Samuel D. Lucas

19 July 1799–23 Feb. 1868. Store owner, recorder of deeds. Born at Washington Co., Kentucky. Son of Samuel Lucas Sr. Married Theresa Bartlett Allen, ca. Nov. 1823, in Harrison Co., Kentucky. Member of Presbyterian church. Lived at Independence, Jackson Co...

View Full Bio
had done, and kept the town

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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well guarded, and permitted none to go out, except now and then one to see their families and then return again. However, in a day or two, he gathered up all the Mormon prisoners and selected forty or fifty, such as he thought, from the best information he could get, ought to be punished, and put them in a store and had them guarded over night. He then withdrew the guard from town and let the remainder go free, but the next day marched with the prisoners to Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
, where Gen. Lucas

19 July 1799–23 Feb. 1868. Store owner, recorder of deeds. Born at Washington Co., Kentucky. Son of Samuel Lucas Sr. Married Theresa Bartlett Allen, ca. Nov. 1823, in Harrison Co., Kentucky. Member of Presbyterian church. Lived at Independence, Jackson Co...

View Full Bio
had been previously ordered to return the prisoners and arms he had taken to Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

More Info
.173

Clark reported that he arrived at Richmond with forty-six prisoners on 9 November. (John B. Clark, Richmond, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 10 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


In Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

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, they guarded the prisoners, seven of whom (the leaders) they put in irons,174

JS, Sidney Rigdon, Hyrum Smith, Parley P. Pratt, George W. Robinson, Lyman Wight, and Amasa Lyman. (JS, Richmond, MO, to Emma Smith, Far West, MO, 12 Nov. 1838, JS, Materials, CCLA; [Rigdon], Appeal to the American People, 65 [also in “History, of the Persecution,” Sept. 1840, 1:164].)  


and held a court of enquiry before Judge Austin A. King

21 Sept. 1802–22 Apr. 1870. Attorney, judge, politician, farmer. Born at Sullivan Co., Tennessee. Son of Walter King and Nancy Sevier. Married first Nancy Harris Roberts, 13 May 1828, at Jackson, Madison Co., Tennessee. In 1830, moved to Missouri, where he...

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over them;175

Sixty-four defendants were named in the criminal court of inquiry, the equivalent of a preliminary hearing. King presided over the proceedings 12–29 November. (See [Rigdon], Appeal to the American People, 66–68 [also in “History, of the Persecution,” Sept. 1840, 1:161–164].)  


after which they retained thirty-six for trial, and let the rest, between twenty and thirty, go free. Those retained for trial were charged with various crimes—treason, murder, arson, burglary, robbery, and larceny.176

According to the printed transcript, thirty-four Latter-day Saints were bound over to stand trial in the counties where charges were brought: JS, Lyman Wight, Hyrum Smith, Alexander McRae, and Caleb Baldwin were to be tried for treason in Daviess County 7 March 1839; Sidney Rigdon was to be tried for treason in Caldwell County 1 April 1839; Darwin Chase, Luman Gibbs, Morris Phelps, Parley P. Pratt, and Norman Shearer were to be tried for murder in Ray County 11 March 1839; and twenty-three others were to be tried for arson, burglary, robbery, and larceny in Daviess County 28 March 1839. (Document Containing the Correspondence, 150; see also Madsen, “Joseph Smith and the Missouri Court of Inquiry,” 126–127.)  


Gen. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
, before leaving Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, sent Gen. Robert Wilson

Nov. 1800–10 May 1870. Politician, Lawyer, Farmer. Born near Staunton, Augusta Co., Virginia. Moved to Franklin, Howard Co., Missouri Territory, by 1820. Married Margaret (Peggie) Snoddy, 18 May 1826. Served as clerk of circuit and county courts in Randolph...

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to Adamondiaman Adam-ondi-Ahman

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

More Info
with a sufficient force, and he so regulated matters there as to have all the Mormons leave Daviess county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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except a very few, who were to see to the property, &c.177

Wilson promised the Mormons military protection for ten days, after which it was understood they would be subject to retribution from their enemies. The members of the committee responsible to gather, sell, and exchange Mormon assets were William Earl, Elijah B. Gaylor, William Hale, Henry Herriman, Mayhew Hillman, Henry Humphrey, William Huntington, John Reed, Oliver Snow, Daniel Stanton, Benjamin S. Wilbur, and Z. Wilson. Huntington, foreman of the committee, reported that they were allowed to remain in Daviess County for one month. (Robert Wilson, Keytesville, MO, to John B. Clark, 25 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA; Huntington, Diaries of William Huntington, 6–7.)  


The Mormons from Davies

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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mostly went to Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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.
The prisoners charged with treason and murder were confined in jail, in Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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and Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

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, and the rest let to bail.178

Sidney Rigdon was charged with treason in Caldwell County, but because there was no “sufficient jail” in Caldwell, he was jailed at Liberty with those facing treason charges in Daviess County. The men charged with murder in Ray County were held at Richmond, the county seat. Those charged with lesser offenses in Daviess County who were unable to post bail were also incarcerated in Richmond, there being no adequate holding facility in Daviess. (Document Containing the Correspondence, 150.)  


During this campaign, many reports were circulated concerning the misconduct of the soldiers, but how far they were true I am not able to say, but I thought at the time, the officers tried to keep good order among the [p. 43]
was sent to Adamondiaman [Adam-ondi-Ahman]

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

More Info
, where were about one hundred and fifty  armed Mormons, who surrendered to him and gave up their arms.168

This surrender occurred on 9 November 1838.  


 The five prisoners who first surrendered, together with Amasa Lyman

30 Mar. 1813–4 Feb. 1877. Boatman, gunsmith, farmer. Born at Lyman, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Son of Boswell Lyman and Martha Mason. Baptized into LDS church by Lyman E. Johnson, 27 Apr. 1832. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, May–June 1832. Ordained an...

View Full Bio
 and Hiram [Hyrum] Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
, who had been added to them, remained in the camp  until Friday morning,169

2 November 1838.  


when Gen. M[oses] Wilson

1795–ca. 1868. Farmer, merchant, land developer, postmaster. Born in Virginia. Moved to Greene Co., Tennessee, by Dec. 1818. Married first Margaret Guin, 23 Dec. 1829, in Greene Co. Moved to Pike Co., Illinois, by Apr. 1832. Served in Black Hawk War, 1832...

View Full Bio
, of Jackson

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
, started with  the prisoners and arms to Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

More Info
.170

Lucas ordered Wilson to escort the prisoners to Lucas’s headquarters at Independence. (Samuel D. Lucas, “near Far West,” to Lilburn W. Boggs, 2 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


The troops were then dis charged, except a guard around town.

Chapter 25

CHAPTER XXV.
 
Arrival of Gen. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
—Number of his troops—Prisoners selected—Marched to Rich mond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
—Investigation—Prisoners retained—Charges against them—Conduct of the  soldiers—Prisoner killed—Property taken by citizens—Appropriation—Petition  of Mormons.
 
On Saturday evening or Sunday morning, Gen. [John B.] Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
arrived with  fourteen hundred mounted men, and said there were six thousand more  within a day’s march, but they were turned back.171

Clark arrived at Far West on Sunday, 4 November 1838. He led a force of approximately sixteen hundred. (John B. Clark, Richmond, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 10 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA; History of Caldwell and Livingston Counties, Missouri, 140.)  


Previous to the  arrival of Gen. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
, the Mormons were gathered together and about  five hundred made to sign a deed of trust, in which five commissioners  were appointed,172

The commissioners were William Collins of Jackson County, G. W. Woodward of Ray County, Elisha Cameron of Clay County, and John Corrill and Morris Phelps of Far West, Caldwell County. (Samuel D. Lucas, Independence, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 5 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


to whom they deeded all their property in trust for  the use of all the creditors of the church, and also to pay all the dam ages done by the Danites, and the overplus, if any, was to be refunded.  Gen. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
ratified what Gen. [Samuel D.] Lucas

19 July 1799–23 Feb. 1868. Store owner, recorder of deeds. Born at Washington Co., Kentucky. Son of Samuel Lucas Sr. Married Theresa Bartlett Allen, ca. Nov. 1823, in Harrison Co., Kentucky. Member of Presbyterian church. Lived at Independence, Jackson Co...

View Full Bio
had done, and kept the town

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
well  guarded, and permitted none to go out, except now and then one to  see their families and then return again. However, in a day or two,  he gathered up all the Mormon prisoners and selected forty or fifty,  such as he thought, from the best information he could get, ought to be  punished, and put them in a store and had them guarded over night.  He then withdrew the guard from town and let the remainder go free,  but the next day marched with the prisoners to Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
, where Gen.  Lucas

19 July 1799–23 Feb. 1868. Store owner, recorder of deeds. Born at Washington Co., Kentucky. Son of Samuel Lucas Sr. Married Theresa Bartlett Allen, ca. Nov. 1823, in Harrison Co., Kentucky. Member of Presbyterian church. Lived at Independence, Jackson Co...

View Full Bio
had been previously ordered to return the prisoners and arms  he had taken to Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

More Info
.173

Clark reported that he arrived at Richmond with forty-six prisoners on 9 November. (John B. Clark, Richmond, MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 10 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


In Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
, they guarded the priso ners, seven of whom (the leaders) they put in irons,174

JS, Sidney Rigdon, Hyrum Smith, Parley P. Pratt, George W. Robinson, Lyman Wight, and Amasa Lyman. (JS, Richmond, MO, to Emma Smith, Far West, MO, 12 Nov. 1838, JS, Materials, CCLA; [Rigdon], Appeal to the American People, 65 [also in “History, of the Persecution,” Sept. 1840, 1:164].)  


and held a court  of enquiry before Judge [Austin A.] King

21 Sept. 1802–22 Apr. 1870. Attorney, judge, politician, farmer. Born at Sullivan Co., Tennessee. Son of Walter King and Nancy Sevier. Married first Nancy Harris Roberts, 13 May 1828, at Jackson, Madison Co., Tennessee. In 1830, moved to Missouri, where he...

View Full Bio
over them;175

Sixty-four defendants were named in the criminal court of inquiry, the equivalent of a preliminary hearing. King presided over the proceedings 12–29 November. (See [Rigdon], Appeal to the American People, 66–68 [also in “History, of the Persecution,” Sept. 1840, 1:161–164].)  


after which they retained  thirty-six for trial, and let the rest, between twenty and thirty, go  free. Those retained for trial were charged with various crimes— treason, murder, arson, burglary, robbery, and larceny.176

According to the printed transcript, thirty-four Latter-day Saints were bound over to stand trial in the counties where charges were brought: JS, Lyman Wight, Hyrum Smith, Alexander McRae, and Caleb Baldwin were to be tried for treason in Daviess County 7 March 1839; Sidney Rigdon was to be tried for treason in Caldwell County 1 April 1839; Darwin Chase, Luman Gibbs, Morris Phelps, Parley P. Pratt, and Norman Shearer were to be tried for murder in Ray County 11 March 1839; and twenty-three others were to be tried for arson, burglary, robbery, and larceny in Daviess County 28 March 1839. (Document Containing the Correspondence, 150; see also Madsen, “Joseph Smith and the Missouri Court of Inquiry,” 126–127.)  


Gen. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
,  before leaving Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, sent Gen. [Robert] Wilson

Nov. 1800–10 May 1870. Politician, Lawyer, Farmer. Born near Staunton, Augusta Co., Virginia. Moved to Franklin, Howard Co., Missouri Territory, by 1820. Married Margaret (Peggie) Snoddy, 18 May 1826. Served as clerk of circuit and county courts in Randolph...

View Full Bio
to Adamondiaman [Adam-ondi-Ahman]

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

More Info
with a  sufficient force, and he so regulated matters there as to have all the  Mormons leave Davies[s] county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
except a very few, who were to see  to the property, &c.177

Wilson promised the Mormons military protection for ten days, after which it was understood they would be subject to retribution from their enemies. The members of the committee responsible to gather, sell, and exchange Mormon assets were William Earl, Elijah B. Gaylor, William Hale, Henry Herriman, Mayhew Hillman, Henry Humphrey, William Huntington, John Reed, Oliver Snow, Daniel Stanton, Benjamin S. Wilbur, and Z. Wilson. Huntington, foreman of the committee, reported that they were allowed to remain in Daviess County for one month. (Robert Wilson, Keytesville, MO, to John B. Clark, 25 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA; Huntington, Diaries of William Huntington, 6–7.)  


The Mormons from Davies

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
mostly went to  Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
.
The prisoners charged with treason and murder were confined in  jail, in Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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and Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
, and the rest let to bail.178

Sidney Rigdon was charged with treason in Caldwell County, but because there was no “sufficient jail” in Caldwell, he was jailed at Liberty with those facing treason charges in Daviess County. The men charged with murder in Ray County were held at Richmond, the county seat. Those charged with lesser offenses in Daviess County who were unable to post bail were also incarcerated in Richmond, there being no adequate holding facility in Daviess. (Document Containing the Correspondence, 150.)  


During this  campaign, many reports were circulated concerning the misconduct  of the soldiers, but how far they were true I am not able to say, but  I thought at the time, the officers tried to keep good order among the [p. 43]
PreviousNext
John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, (Commonly Called Mormons;) Including an Account of Their Doctrine and Discipline; with the Reasons of the Author for Leaving the Church, St. Louis, MO: “Printed for the Author,” 1839; two preliminary leaves, 7–50 pp.; includes typeset signature marks. The copy used for transcription is held at CHL; includes handwritten underscoring, notes, and other marks, as well as archival stamps.
This booklet was printed in octavo format on three sheets cut and folded into seven gatherings. The interior gatherings were made from half sheets folded into four leaves, and the initial and final gatherings were made from quarter sheets folded into two leaves, making a total of twenty-four leaves in the booklet. The text block measures 8½ x 5½ x ⅛ inches (22 x 14 x 0.3 cm). Examination of the copies at CHL and BYU, as well as images of a third copy,1

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints, microfilm (New Haven, CT: Research Publications, 1967).  


indicate that the booklet was originally side stitched. The binding of the copy at CHL has been altered.2

Needle holes along the center folds suggest that the CHL copy of the booklet was once bound with other similar-size works. The first page of the booklet bears the faded and now faint pencil notation “No 2.” on the upper right corner, a possible indication of the booklet’s arrangement in a collection of tracts. The first page of the booklet also bears a handwritten “20” in ink below the title. A photocopy made in 1971 or earlier shows that the CHL copy was not intact at that time. The copy at CHL is currently sewn through a new set of holes in the center folds. (Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


It appears to have been in church custody since at least the early 1880s.3

A circa 1881–1884 inventory of printed works at the Church Historian’s Office includes Corrill’s booklet. The copy held at CHL bears the extremely faded inscription “Historian’s Office” and includes purple Historian’s Office stamps, which were in use as early as the late nineteenth century. A circa 1971 photocopy shows a “Historian’s Office Library” adhesive label (since removed) on page 2 of the CHL copy. These archival records and marks indicate continuous church custody since the early 1880s. (“Church Works, Periodicals, and Pamphlets, Alphabetically Arranged,” 22, Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


Facts