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John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

the members of the Church with a spirit of consecration and voluntary offering. Some have thus been led to give up all, while others have been backward, which has caused the leaders, at times, to resort to other means of obtaining money to carry on their operations. From some they would borrow, promising to pay again, others they would stimulate to liberality by promising them blessings and prosperity in the name of the Lord, in their business and future prospects: thus, many, from time to time, have lost their property and become dissatisfied, until a great many have lost confidence in their leaders. Shortly after the Danites became organized, they set out to enforce the law of consecration; but this did not amount to much. Then they undertook another plan, in which Doctor Arverd [Sampson Avard]

23 Oct. 1800–15 Apr. 1869. Physician. Born at St. Peter, Isle of Guernsey, Channel Islands, Great Britain. Migrated to U.S., by 1830. Married Eliza, a native of Virginia. Located at North Carolina, 1830. Moved to Virginia, by 1831. Moved to Freedom, Beaver...

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was very officious and forward, viz.: to constitute large firms, so that every male member of the Church could become a member of the firm. Every man was to put in all his property by leasing it to the firm for a term of years; overseers or managers were to be chosen from time to time, by the members of the firm, to manage the concerns of the same, and the rest were to labor under their direction. In the division of the profits, more regard was to be paid towards the needs and wants of the members, than to the amount of stock put in. Many joined these firms, while many others were much dissatisfied with them, which caused considerable feeling and excitement in the Church. Smith said every man must act his own feelings, whether to join or not, yet great exertions were used, and especially by Doctor Arverd

23 Oct. 1800–15 Apr. 1869. Physician. Born at St. Peter, Isle of Guernsey, Channel Islands, Great Britain. Migrated to U.S., by 1830. Married Eliza, a native of Virginia. Located at North Carolina, 1830. Moved to Virginia, by 1831. Moved to Freedom, Beaver...

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, to persuade all to join.

Chapter 27

CHAPTER XXVII.
 
Healing the Sick—Blessing Children—Age of Accountability—Patriarchs—Words of Wisdom—Sacrament—Resurrection and Future State—Matter Eternal—War Law—Cause of Difficulty—Remarks to the Church.
 
The Mormons believe in, and constantly practice the laying on of hands and praying for the healing of the sick: sometimes they have been healed, sometimes partly healed, and sometimes not benefitted at all. If they are healed they say it was because of their faith, as the Saviour promised, “According to thy faith be it unto thee; thy faith hath made thee whole,” &c.—Matt. viii. 13, and ix. 22. If partly healed, it is still according to their faith, as it was said of some in old times “And they began to amend from that very hour;” but if they are not healed, or benefitted at all, then it is for the want of faith, as when the lunatic was brought to the disciples and they could not heal him because of their unbelief—Matt. xvii. 20, and xiii. 58. But they think in this as in many other cases, practice makes perfect, and it is necessary to an increase in faith, confidence and the power of God.
The members of the Church are required to bring their children under eight years old, into meeting, and have the elders lay hands [p. 46]
the members of the Church with a spirit of consecration and voluntary  offering. Some have thus been led to give up all, while others have  been backward, which has caused the leaders, at times, to resort to  other means of obtaining money to carry on their operations. From  some they would borrow, promising to pay again, others they would  stimulate to liberality by promising them blessings and prosperity in  the name of the Lord, in their business and future prospects: thus,  many, from time to time, have lost their property and become dissa tisfied, until a great many have lost confidence in their leaders. Short ly after the Danites became organized, they set out to enforce the  law of consecration; but this did not amount to much. Then they  undertook another plan, in which Doctor Arverd [Sampson Avard]

23 Oct. 1800–15 Apr. 1869. Physician. Born at St. Peter, Isle of Guernsey, Channel Islands, Great Britain. Migrated to U.S., by 1830. Married Eliza, a native of Virginia. Located at North Carolina, 1830. Moved to Virginia, by 1831. Moved to Freedom, Beaver...

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was very officious  and forward, viz.: to constitute large firms, so that every male mem ber of the Church could become a member of the firm.188

According to JS’s account, three agricultural companies were established among the Latter-day Saints at Far West on 20 and 21 August 1838. Reed Peck recounted that there were four companies and that a revelation commanded church members to consecrate all of their land and property to the companies. JS’s journal links the Danites and enforcement of consecration. (JS, Journal, 27 July and 20–21 Aug. 1838; Reed Peck, Quincy, IL, to “Dear Friends,” 18 Sept. 1839, pp. 51–53, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA.)  


Every man  was to put in all his property by leasing it to the firm for a term of  years;189

Albert P. Rockwood reported that church members leased all their land except city lots to the firms. (Rockwood, Journal, 6 Oct. 1838.)  


overseers or managers were to be chosen from time to time,  by the members of the firm, to manage the concerns of the same, and  the rest were to labor under their direction. In the division of the  profits, more regard was to be paid towards the needs and wants of  the members, than to the amount of stock put in. Many joined these  firms, while many others were much dissatisfied with them, which  caused considerable feeling and excitement in the Church. Smith  said every man must act his own feelings, whether to join or not, yet  great exertions were used, and especially by Doctor Arverd

23 Oct. 1800–15 Apr. 1869. Physician. Born at St. Peter, Isle of Guernsey, Channel Islands, Great Britain. Migrated to U.S., by 1830. Married Eliza, a native of Virginia. Located at North Carolina, 1830. Moved to Virginia, by 1831. Moved to Freedom, Beaver...

View Full Bio
, to per suade all to join.

Chapter 27

CHAPTER XXVII.
 
Healing the Sick—Blessing Children—Age of Accountability—Patriarchs—Words  of Wisdom—Sacrament—Resurrection and Future State—Matter Eternal—War  Law—Cause of Difficulty—Remarks to the Church.
 
The Mormons believe in, and constantly practice the laying on of  hands and praying for the healing of the sick: sometimes they have  been healed, sometimes partly healed, and sometimes not benefitted at  all. If they are healed they say it was because of their faith, as the  Saviour promised, “According to thy faith be it unto thee; thy faith  hath made thee whole,” &c.—Matt. viii. 13, and ix. 22. If partly  healed, it is still according to their faith, as it was said of some in  old times “And they began to amend from that very hour;” but if  they are not healed, or benefitted at all, then it is for the want of  faith, as when the lunatic was brought to the disciples and they could  not heal him because of their unbelief—Matt. xvii. 20, and xiii. 58.190

See also Revelation, 9 Feb. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 13:12–13, 1835 ed. [D&C 42:43–52].  


 But they think in this as in many other cases, practice makes per fect, and it is necessary to an increase in faith, confidence and the  power of God.
The members of the Church are required to bring their children  under eight years old, into meeting, and have the elders lay hands [p. 46]
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John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, (Commonly Called Mormons;) Including an Account of Their Doctrine and Discipline; with the Reasons of the Author for Leaving the Church, St. Louis, MO: “Printed for the Author,” 1839; two preliminary leaves, 7–50 pp.; includes typeset signature marks. The copy used for transcription is held at CHL; includes handwritten underscoring, notes, and other marks, as well as archival stamps.
This booklet was printed in octavo format on three sheets cut and folded into seven gatherings. The interior gatherings were made from half sheets folded into four leaves, and the initial and final gatherings were made from quarter sheets folded into two leaves, making a total of twenty-four leaves in the booklet. The text block measures 8½ x 5½ x ⅛ inches (22 x 14 x 0.3 cm). Examination of the copies at CHL and BYU, as well as images of a third copy,1

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints, microfilm (New Haven, CT: Research Publications, 1967).  


indicate that the booklet was originally side stitched. The binding of the copy at CHL has been altered.2

Needle holes along the center folds suggest that the CHL copy of the booklet was once bound with other similar-size works. The first page of the booklet bears the faded and now faint pencil notation “No 2.” on the upper right corner, a possible indication of the booklet’s arrangement in a collection of tracts. The first page of the booklet also bears a handwritten “20” in ink below the title. A photocopy made in 1971 or earlier shows that the CHL copy was not intact at that time. The copy at CHL is currently sewn through a new set of holes in the center folds. (Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


It appears to have been in church custody since at least the early 1880s.3

A circa 1881–1884 inventory of printed works at the Church Historian’s Office includes Corrill’s booklet. The copy held at CHL bears the extremely faded inscription “Historian’s Office” and includes purple Historian’s Office stamps, which were in use as early as the late nineteenth century. A circa 1971 photocopy shows a “Historian’s Office Library” adhesive label (since removed) on page 2 of the CHL copy. These archival records and marks indicate continuous church custody since the early 1880s. (“Church Works, Periodicals, and Pamphlets, Alphabetically Arranged,” 22, Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


Facts