31765

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

I heard one of the militia tell General John B. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

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, that a well twenty or thirty feet deep, was filled up with their dead bodies to within three feet of the top. These troops, I was told, were from Davies

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
and Livingston

Organized 1837. Population in 1840 about 4,300. Hawn’s Mill Massacre planned by mob in eastern part of county.

More Info
, and some from Carroll, but by what authority they fell upon these Mormons I never could learn.147

Thomas Jennings, a militia officer from Livingston County, led a force of two to three hundred mounted men, most of them from Livingston County but also some from Daviess, Caldwell, and Carroll counties. There is no evidence that the attack was in response to orders from any higher military authority. (Baugh, “Call to Arms,” 266–267.)  


Chapter 23

CHAPTER XXIII.
 
Peace sought for—Militia encamp at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
—Correspondence with the officers—Breast-work—Governor

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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’s order.
 
On Sunday the fourth of November, we heard that Generals Atchinson David R. Atchison

11 Aug. 1807–26 Jan. 1886. Lawyer, judge, agriculturist, politician, farmer. Born at Frogtown, near Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of William Atchison and Catherine Allen. About 1830, moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Missouri, where he became a prominent...

View Full Bio
and Alexander Doniphan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

View Full Bio
, with an army, were encamped on Crooked river

Located in northwest Missouri. Rises in Clinton Co. and flows about sixty miles southeast through Caldwell and Ray counties; drains into Missouri River. Saints settled mainly on northwestern and southeastern sections of river, by 1835; main settlement also...

More Info
.148

Corrill’s dating is inaccurate. The Saints at Far West heard about the approaching army on Monday, 29 October 1838, the same day militia forces under the command of Samuel D. Lucas and David R. Atchison departed from the vicinity of Richmond, Ray County. (Brigadier General Alexander Doniphan served under Atchison’s command at the time.) That night the militia encamped sixteen miles from Far West at “Linville’s Creek,” apparently a tributary of Crooked River. (Reed Peck, Quincy, IL, to “Dear Friends,” 18 Sept. 1839, pp. 102–103, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA; Samuel D. Lucas, “near Far West,” to Lilburn W. Boggs, 2 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


On Sunday evening Smith came to me to have me accompany Reed Peck

1814–23 Aug. 1894. Millwright, farmer. Born in Bainbridge Township, Chenango Co., New York. Son of Hezekiah Peck and Martha Long. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Moved from New York to Ohio and then to Kaw Township, Jackson Co., Missouri, Apr.–July 1831...

View Full Bio
the next day to meet their army with a white flag, in order to open a correspondence, if possible, and agree upon some terms of peace.149

Peck wrote that his and Corrill’s all-day efforts to meet with the militia took place Tuesday, 30 October. (Reed Peck, Quincy, IL, to “Dear Friends,” 18 Sept. 1839, p. 103, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA.)  


We went in company with Colonel George M. Hinkle

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

View Full Bio
and about one hundred and sixty horsemen. When we got near Crooked river

Located in northwest Missouri. Rises in Clinton Co. and flows about sixty miles southeast through Caldwell and Ray counties; drains into Missouri River. Saints settled mainly on northwestern and southeastern sections of river, by 1835; main settlement also...

More Info
we learned that the army had moved on to Log creek, and were making their way to Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
.150

Samuel D. Lucas and David R. Atchison rendezvoused at Log Creek with Doniphan and his troops Tuesday morning, 30 October. In response to orders from Governor Lilburn W. Boggs that arrived at this time, Atchison left his troops the same day and returned to Liberty, Clay County. (Samuel D. Lucas, “near Far West,” to Lilburn W. Boggs, 2 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


We thought proper to return, and it was with difficulty that we got back, for the militia had come between us and town. When we arrived, we saw a line of battle drawn up by the militia, and the Mormons also arrayed to meet them, but the militia, for some cause, withdrew to their camp on Goose creek. About dark, Reed Peck

1814–23 Aug. 1894. Millwright, farmer. Born in Bainbridge Township, Chenango Co., New York. Son of Hezekiah Peck and Martha Long. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Moved from New York to Ohio and then to Kaw Township, Jackson Co., Missouri, Apr.–July 1831...

View Full Bio
took a white flag, and went into their camp. He saw General Doniphan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

View Full Bio
and others. General Samuel D. Lucas

19 July 1799–23 Feb. 1868. Store owner, recorder of deeds. Born at Washington Co., Kentucky. Son of Samuel Lucas Sr. Married Theresa Bartlett Allen, ca. Nov. 1823, in Harrison Co., Kentucky. Member of Presbyterian church. Lived at Independence, Jackson Co...

View Full Bio
, with his troops from Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
, had joined the army, and they were about thirteen hundred strong.151

Lucas reported that he was in command of a combined force of about eighteen hundred troops at this time. (Samuel D. Lucas, “near Far West,” MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 2 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


When Peck

1814–23 Aug. 1894. Millwright, farmer. Born in Bainbridge Township, Chenango Co., New York. Son of Hezekiah Peck and Martha Long. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Moved from New York to Ohio and then to Kaw Township, Jackson Co., Missouri, Apr.–July 1831...

View Full Bio
returned he said that General Doniphan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

View Full Bio
had appointed the next morning at eight o’clock to meet a committee of Mormons and make proposals of peace. He promised that no harm should befal us that night; he stated that their object was to bring the guilty to punishment, but the innocent should have an opportunity to escape before they would attack the place.
That night, the Mormons built a sort of breastwork of rails, house-logs, boards, &c. on that side of town next to the army,152

That is, on the south side of Far West.  


but it was about as good a defence as a common fence would be. Much has been said abroad about the Mormons building forts, entrenchments, &c., but this breast-work spoken of above is all that they ever had. In the night both armies were alarmed more or less, each being afraid of an attack from the other.
Next morning, at the time appointed, Reed Peck

1814–23 Aug. 1894. Millwright, farmer. Born in Bainbridge Township, Chenango Co., New York. Son of Hezekiah Peck and Martha Long. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Moved from New York to Ohio and then to Kaw Township, Jackson Co., Missouri, Apr.–July 1831...

View Full Bio
, Colonel Hinkle

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

View Full Bio
, and myself, went with the white flag,153

According to Peck, the Mormon delegation also included William W. Phelps, John Cleminson, and Seymour Brunson. (Reed Peck, Quincy, IL, to “Dear Friends,” 18 Sept. 1839, pp. 108–109, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA.)  


and met generals Lucas

19 July 1799–23 Feb. 1868. Store owner, recorder of deeds. Born at Washington Co., Kentucky. Son of Samuel Lucas Sr. Married Theresa Bartlett Allen, ca. Nov. 1823, in Harrison Co., Kentucky. Member of Presbyterian church. Lived at Independence, Jackson Co...

View Full Bio
, Doniphan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

View Full Bio
, and some other officers, who informed us that they were waiting for General John B. Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
, whom they expected soon with the Governor

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

View Full Bio
’s order; that they were not prepared to make proposals of peace until it arrived, for they knew not what it would require of them or us. They agreed to let us know as soon as they received it. At the same [p. 40]
I heard one of the militia tell General [John B.] Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
, that a well twenty or  thirty feet deep, was filled up with their dead bodies to within three  feet of the top. These troops, I was told, were from Davies

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
and Liv ingston

Organized 1837. Population in 1840 about 4,300. Hawn’s Mill Massacre planned by mob in eastern part of county.

More Info
, and some from Carroll, but by what authority they fell upon  these Mormons I never could learn.147

Thomas Jennings, a militia officer from Livingston County, led a force of two to three hundred mounted men, most of them from Livingston County but also some from Daviess, Caldwell, and Carroll counties. There is no evidence that the attack was in response to orders from any higher military authority. (Baugh, “Call to Arms,” 266–267.)  


Chapter 23

CHAPTER XXIII.
 
Peace sought for—Militia encamp at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
—Correspondence with the officers— Breast-work—Governor

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

View Full Bio
’s order.
 
On Sunday the fourth of November, we heard that Generals At chinson [David R. Atchison]

11 Aug. 1807–26 Jan. 1886. Lawyer, judge, agriculturist, politician, farmer. Born at Frogtown, near Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of William Atchison and Catherine Allen. About 1830, moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Missouri, where he became a prominent...

View Full Bio
and [Alexander] Doniphan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

View Full Bio
, with an army, were encamped on Crooked  river

Located in northwest Missouri. Rises in Clinton Co. and flows about sixty miles southeast through Caldwell and Ray counties; drains into Missouri River. Saints settled mainly on northwestern and southeastern sections of river, by 1835; main settlement also...

More Info
.148

Corrill’s dating is inaccurate. The Saints at Far West heard about the approaching army on Monday, 29 October 1838, the same day militia forces under the command of Samuel D. Lucas and David R. Atchison departed from the vicinity of Richmond, Ray County. (Brigadier General Alexander Doniphan served under Atchison’s command at the time.) That night the militia encamped sixteen miles from Far West at “Linville’s Creek,” apparently a tributary of Crooked River. (Reed Peck, Quincy, IL, to “Dear Friends,” 18 Sept. 1839, pp. 102–103, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA; Samuel D. Lucas, “near Far West,” to Lilburn W. Boggs, 2 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


On Sunday evening Smith came to me to have me accompany  Reed Peck

1814–23 Aug. 1894. Millwright, farmer. Born in Bainbridge Township, Chenango Co., New York. Son of Hezekiah Peck and Martha Long. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Moved from New York to Ohio and then to Kaw Township, Jackson Co., Missouri, Apr.–July 1831...

View Full Bio
the next day to meet their army with a white flag, in order  to open a correspondence, if possible, and agree upon some terms of  peace.149

Peck wrote that his and Corrill’s all-day efforts to meet with the militia took place Tuesday, 30 October. (Reed Peck, Quincy, IL, to “Dear Friends,” 18 Sept. 1839, p. 103, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA.)  


We went in company with Colonel [George M.] Hinkle

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

View Full Bio
and about one  hundred and sixty horsemen. When we got near Crooked river

Located in northwest Missouri. Rises in Clinton Co. and flows about sixty miles southeast through Caldwell and Ray counties; drains into Missouri River. Saints settled mainly on northwestern and southeastern sections of river, by 1835; main settlement also...

More Info
we  learned that the army had moved on to Log creek, and were making  their way to Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
.150

Samuel D. Lucas and David R. Atchison rendezvoused at Log Creek with Doniphan and his troops Tuesday morning, 30 October. In response to orders from Governor Lilburn W. Boggs that arrived at this time, Atchison left his troops the same day and returned to Liberty, Clay County. (Samuel D. Lucas, “near Far West,” to Lilburn W. Boggs, 2 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


We thought proper to return, and it was  with difficulty that we got back, for the militia had come between us  and town. When we arrived, we saw a line of battle drawn up by  the militia, and the Mormons also arrayed to meet them, but the mili tia, for some cause, withdrew to their camp on Goose creek. About  dark, Reed Peck

1814–23 Aug. 1894. Millwright, farmer. Born in Bainbridge Township, Chenango Co., New York. Son of Hezekiah Peck and Martha Long. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Moved from New York to Ohio and then to Kaw Township, Jackson Co., Missouri, Apr.–July 1831...

View Full Bio
took a white flag, and went into their camp. He  saw General Doniphan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

View Full Bio
and others. General [Samuel D.] Lucas

19 July 1799–23 Feb. 1868. Store owner, recorder of deeds. Born at Washington Co., Kentucky. Son of Samuel Lucas Sr. Married Theresa Bartlett Allen, ca. Nov. 1823, in Harrison Co., Kentucky. Member of Presbyterian church. Lived at Independence, Jackson Co...

View Full Bio
, with his troops  from Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
, had joined the army, and they were about thir teen hundred strong.151

Lucas reported that he was in command of a combined force of about eighteen hundred troops at this time. (Samuel D. Lucas, “near Far West,” MO, to Lilburn W. Boggs, 2 Nov. 1838, copy, Mormon War Papers, MSA.)  


When Peck

1814–23 Aug. 1894. Millwright, farmer. Born in Bainbridge Township, Chenango Co., New York. Son of Hezekiah Peck and Martha Long. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Moved from New York to Ohio and then to Kaw Township, Jackson Co., Missouri, Apr.–July 1831...

View Full Bio
returned he said that General  Doniphan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

View Full Bio
had appointed the next morning at eight o’clock to meet a  committee of Mormons and make proposals of peace. He promised  that no harm should befal us that night; he stated that their object was  to bring the guilty to punishment, but the innocent should have an op portunity to escape before they would attack the place.
That night, the Mormons built a sort of breastwork of rails, house- logs, boards, &c. on that side of town next [to] the army,152

That is, on the south side of Far West.  


but it was about  as good a defence as a common fence would be. Much has been said  abroad about the Mormons building forts, entrenchments, &c., but  this breast-work spoken of above is all that they ever had. In the  night both armies were alarmed more or less, each being afraid of an  attack from the other.
Next morning, at the time appointed, Reed Peck

1814–23 Aug. 1894. Millwright, farmer. Born in Bainbridge Township, Chenango Co., New York. Son of Hezekiah Peck and Martha Long. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Moved from New York to Ohio and then to Kaw Township, Jackson Co., Missouri, Apr.–July 1831...

View Full Bio
, Colonel Hinkle

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

View Full Bio
,  and myself, went with the white flag,153

According to Peck, the Mormon delegation also included William W. Phelps, John Cleminson, and Seymour Brunson. (Reed Peck, Quincy, IL, to “Dear Friends,” 18 Sept. 1839, pp. 108–109, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA.)  


and met generals Lucas

19 July 1799–23 Feb. 1868. Store owner, recorder of deeds. Born at Washington Co., Kentucky. Son of Samuel Lucas Sr. Married Theresa Bartlett Allen, ca. Nov. 1823, in Harrison Co., Kentucky. Member of Presbyterian church. Lived at Independence, Jackson Co...

View Full Bio
, Doni phan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

View Full Bio
, and some other officers, who informed us that they were wait ing for General [John B.] Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
, whom they expected soon with the Governor

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

View Full Bio
’s  order; that they were not prepared to make proposals of peace until  it arrived, for they knew not what it would require of them or us.  They agreed to let us know as soon as they received it. At the same [p. 40]
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John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, (Commonly Called Mormons;) Including an Account of Their Doctrine and Discipline; with the Reasons of the Author for Leaving the Church, St. Louis, MO: “Printed for the Author,” 1839; two preliminary leaves, 7–50 pp.; includes typeset signature marks. The copy used for transcription is held at CHL; includes handwritten underscoring, notes, and other marks, as well as archival stamps.
This booklet was printed in octavo format on three sheets cut and folded into seven gatherings. The interior gatherings were made from half sheets folded into four leaves, and the initial and final gatherings were made from quarter sheets folded into two leaves, making a total of twenty-four leaves in the booklet. The text block measures 8½ x 5½ x ⅛ inches (22 x 14 x 0.3 cm). Examination of the copies at CHL and BYU, as well as images of a third copy,1

John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints, microfilm (New Haven, CT: Research Publications, 1967).  


indicate that the booklet was originally side stitched. The binding of the copy at CHL has been altered.2

Needle holes along the center folds suggest that the CHL copy of the booklet was once bound with other similar-size works. The first page of the booklet bears the faded and now faint pencil notation “No 2.” on the upper right corner, a possible indication of the booklet’s arrangement in a collection of tracts. The first page of the booklet also bears a handwritten “20” in ink below the title. A photocopy made in 1971 or earlier shows that the CHL copy was not intact at that time. The copy at CHL is currently sewn through a new set of holes in the center folds. (Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


It appears to have been in church custody since at least the early 1880s.3

A circa 1881–1884 inventory of printed works at the Church Historian’s Office includes Corrill’s booklet. The copy held at CHL bears the extremely faded inscription “Historian’s Office” and includes purple Historian’s Office stamps, which were in use as early as the late nineteenth century. A circa 1971 photocopy shows a “Historian’s Office Library” adhesive label (since removed) on page 2 of the CHL copy. These archival records and marks indicate continuous church custody since the early 1880s. (“Church Works, Periodicals, and Pamphlets, Alphabetically Arranged,” 22, Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Corrill, Brief History, photocopy, ca. 1971, CHL.)  


Facts