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John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.
and does not shew the precise order in that respect of the Apostolic church every man is left to judge for himself.

Chapter 14

Chap 14
Smiths charge to the elders. Their return. Gathering continues. Mormons leave Clay county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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and settle in Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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. In debt. Pride. Merchantdizing. Banking. Dissentions and its effects. Elders go to England.
At the Close of the solem assembly meetings in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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Smith told the elders that they were now endowed with power to go forth and build up the Kingdom, that they must now call upon God for themselves, and do that which the spirit directed them to do, and every man was accountable to God for his own doings, and he charged them to be careful and avoid contention; not to meddle with other orders of Christians, nor proclaim against their doctrines, but to preach the Gospel in its simplicity, and let others alone. The elders that lived in Upper Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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returned to their homes in Clay county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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in the spring of 1836, but had not been there long before a portion of the people who had been peacable during their absence, began now to be uneasy. The church also continued to gather in Clay county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
, till the appearance was that they would sooner or later be overun by the Mormons, and this uneasy portion of the people, either because they hated our religion, or were afraid we [p. 44]
and does not shew the precise order  in that respect of the Apostolic church  every man is left to judge for himself.

Chapter 14

Chap 14
Smiths charge to the elders. Their return. Gathering  continues. Mormons leave Clay counties county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
and settle in Cald well

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
. In debt. Pride. Merchantdizing. Banking.  Dissentions and its effects. Elders go to England.
At the Close of the solem assembly  meetings <in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
> Smith told the elders that  they were now endowed with power  to go forth and build up the Church Kingdom,  that they must now call upon God for  themselves, and do that which the spirit  directed them to do, and every man  was accountable to God for his own  doings, and he charged them to be care ful and avoid contention; not to meddle  with other orders of Christians, nor  proclaim against their doctrines, but  to preach the Gospel in its simplicity,  and let others alone. The elders that  lived in Upper Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
returned to their  homes in Clay county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
in the spring of  1836, but had not been there long  before a portion of the people who had  been peacable during their absence,  began now to be uneasy. The church  also continued to gather in Clay  county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
, till the appearance was that they  would sooner or later be overun by  the Mormons, and this uneasy por tion of the people, either because they  hated our religion, or were afraid we [p. 44]
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John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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, “Brief History,” Manuscript, ca. 6 April 1838– ca. 26 January 1839; handwriting of John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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and an unidentified scribe; seventy pages numbered 20–90, plus three unnumbered pages; John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.

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