27466

Journal, 1832–1834


Editorial Note
Ten months passed before JS wrote another entry. In that period he dictated several revelations as he continued revising the Bible, completing his work in July 1833. Organizing and meeting with the School of the Prophets occupied much of his time from January through April. In June, JS and the presidency developed plans for temples in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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and Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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and for expanded Mormon settlement in each city. In August, JS learned that during the previous month vigilantes had destroyed the church’s printing office and store in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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and that the Missouri Latter-day Saints had signed an agreement to evacuate Jackson County by spring 1834. In September, JS helped organize efforts in Kirtland to resume the church’s printing operations. JS renewed his journal keeping in October 1833 as he prepared to proselytize in northeastern Pennsylvania, western New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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, and Upper Canada

British colony of Canada divided into Upper Canada and Lower Canada, 1791; reunited 1841. Upper Canada’s boundaries corresponded roughly to portion of present-day Ontario south of Hudson Bay watershed. Population in 1840 about 430,000. Immigrants mainly from...

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. After he returned to Kirtland a month later, journal entries continued for several weeks.

4 October 1833 • Friday

Making preparation to go east with Freeman Nickerson

5 Feb. 1779–22 Jan. 1847. Seaman. Born at South Dennis, Barnstable Co., Massachusetts. Son of Eleazer Nickerson and Thankful Chase. Moved to Cavendish, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1800. Married Huldah Chapman, 19 Jan. 1801, at Cavendish. Served as officer in Vermont...

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.14

New York Latter-day Saint Freeman Nickerson had traveled to Kirtland, Ohio, and persuaded JS and Sidney Rigdon to accompany him to Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada, to preach to members of his family. Frederick G. Williams explained that JS and Sidney Rigdon had “gone down the Lake to Niagara from thence expect to go into Canada as far as Long point U C and to preach in all the most noted places on the way.” (Gates, Lydia Knight’s History, 16–23; Berrett, Sacred Places, 2:249–250; Frederick G. Williams, Kirtland, OH, to “Dear Brethren,” Independence, MO, 10 Oct. 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, p. 57.)  


A request of brother David Elliott

18 Nov. 1799–2 Dec. 1855. Blacksmith. Born at Charleston, Montgomery Co., New York. Son of Peter Elliott and Phebe Holley. Married first Almira Holliday of Solon, Cortland Co., New York, ca. 1821. Married second Margery Quick. Lived at Ithaca, Tompkins Co...

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to call on his brother-in-law Peter Worrin, St. Catharines

Founded 1790. Incorporated as town, 1845. Population in 1826 about 600. Population in 1846 about 3,500.

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, Upper Canada.
Cobourg

First settled, 1790s. Located on York-Kingston Stagecoach Road. Population in 1832 over 1,000. Incorporated as village, 1837.

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. Richard Lyman request of Uncle John Smith

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational Church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

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.16

Richard Lyman, the brother of John Smith’s wife, Clarissa Lyman Smith, was apparently residing in Cobourg, Hamilton Township, Upper Canada.  


5 October 1833 • Saturday

This day started on a journey

5 Oct. 1833

JS departed Kirtland, Ohio, on proselytizing mission to Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada.

to the East. Came to Ashtabula

Located on southern shore of Lake Erie, about thirty-five miles northeast of Kirtland, Ohio. Settled by New Englanders, ca. 1801. Organized 1808. Ashtabula borough incorporated, 1828. Ashtabula village incorporated, 1831. Important transportation and economic...

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. Stayed at Lamb’s tavern

One of two taverns that existed in Ashtabula Township in 1833. Located either in Ashtabula borough or in Ashtabula East village. Likely located on main road through Ashtabula Township. JS and Freeman Nickerson stayed in tavern, 5 Oct. 1833, while traveling...

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.

6–12 October 1833 • Sunday–Saturday

6th. Arrived at Springfield

Settled 1796. Incorporated 1800. Population in 1830 about 1,500. Population in 1840 about 2,300. Latter-day Saint missionaries passed through area when traveling between Ohio and New York. JS traveled through Springfield on missions, 1833 and 1834. Branch...

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on the Sabbath. Found the brethren in meeting. Brother Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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spoke to the people, etc.17

This meeting may have been held in the home of Andrews and Elizabeth Comins Tyler. (Tyler, “Recollections of the Prophet,” 93; see also Hales, Windows, 101.)  


and in the [p. 5]

Editorial Note
Ten months passed before JS wrote another entry. In that period he dictated several revelations as he continued revising the Bible, completing his work in July 1833. Organizing and meeting with the School of the Prophets occupied much of his time from January through April. In June, JS and the presidency developed plans for temples in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
and Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
and for expanded Mormon settlement in each city. In August, JS learned that during the previous month vigilantes had destroyed the church’s printing office and store in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
and that the Missouri Latter-day Saints had signed an agreement to evacuate Jackson County by spring 1834. In September, JS helped organize efforts in Kirtland to resume the church’s printing operations. JS renewed his journal keeping in October 1833 as he prepared to proselytize in northeastern Pennsylvania, western New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

More Info
, and Upper Canada

British colony of Canada divided into Upper Canada and Lower Canada, 1791; reunited 1841. Upper Canada’s boundaries corresponded roughly to portion of present-day Ontario south of Hudson Bay watershed. Population in 1840 about 430,000. Immigrants mainly from...

More Info
. After he returned to Kirtland a month later, journal entries continued for several weeks.

4 October 1833 • Friday

October 4th <1833> makeing prep eration to go East with  Freeman Nickerson

5 Feb. 1779–22 Jan. 1847. Seaman. Born at South Dennis, Barnstable Co., Massachusetts. Son of Eleazer Nickerson and Thankful Chase. Moved to Cavendish, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1800. Married Huldah Chapman, 19 Jan. 1801, at Cavendish. Served as officer in Vermont...

View Full Bio
14

New York Latter-day Saint Freeman Nickerson had traveled to Kirtland, Ohio, and persuaded JS and Sidney Rigdon to accompany him to Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada, to preach to members of his family. Frederick G. Williams explained that JS and Sidney Rigdon had “gone down the Lake to Niagara from thence expect to go into Canada as far as Long point U C and to preach in all the most noted places on the way.” (Gates, Lydia Knight’s History, 16–23; Berrett, Sacred Places, 2:249–250; Frederick G. Williams, Kirtland, OH, to “Dear Brethren,” Independence, MO, 10 Oct. 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, p. 57.)  


15

TEXT: The first part of the entry for 4 October 1833 was initially inscribed in graphite and then retraced in ink—apparently by JS. The following material, written in heavier ink, was apparently inserted at a different time.  


A request of Brother Da vid Elliott

18 Nov. 1799–2 Dec. 1855. Blacksmith. Born at Charleston, Montgomery Co., New York. Son of Peter Elliott and Phebe Holley. Married first Almira Holliday of Solon, Cortland Co., New York, ca. 1821. Married second Margery Quick. Lived at Ithaca, Tompkins Co...

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to call on  his Brother in Law Peter  Worrin St; kathrine [St. Catharines]

Founded 1790. Incorporated as town, 1845. Population in 1826 about 600. Population in 1846 about 3,500.

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up per Cannada
Cob[o]urg

First settled, 1790s. Located on York-Kingston Stagecoach Road. Population in 1832 over 1,000. Incorporated as village, 1837.

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Richard Lyman  request of Uncle John [Smith]

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational Church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

View Full Bio
16

Richard Lyman, the brother of John Smith’s wife, Clarissa Lyman Smith, was apparently residing in Cobourg, Hamilton Township, Upper Canada.  


5 October 1833 • Saturday

5th this day started on a  Journy

5 Oct. 1833

JS departed Kirtland, Ohio, on proselytizing mission to Mount Pleasant, Upper Canada.

to the East came to  Ashtibuly [Ashtabula]

Located on southern shore of Lake Erie, about thirty-five miles northeast of Kirtland, Ohio. Settled by New Englanders, ca. 1801. Organized 1808. Ashtabula borough incorporated, 1828. Ashtabula village incorporated, 1831. Important transportation and economic...

More Info
<stayed> Lambs tavern

One of two taverns that existed in Ashtabula Township in 1833. Located either in Ashtabula borough or in Ashtabula East village. Likely located on main road through Ashtabula Township. JS and Freeman Nickerson stayed in tavern, 5 Oct. 1833, while traveling...

More Info

6–12 October 1833 • Sunday–Saturday

6th arrived at Springfield [Pennsylvania]

Settled 1796. Incorporated 1800. Population in 1830 about 1,500. Population in 1840 about 2,300. Latter-day Saint missionaries passed through area when traveling between Ohio and New York. JS traveled through Springfield on missions, 1833 and 1834. Branch...

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 <on the sabbath> found the Brotheren in mee ting Brother Sidney [Rigdon]

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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spake to  the people &c—17

This meeting may have been held in the home of Andrews and Elizabeth Comins Tyler. (Tyler, “Recollections of the Prophet,” 93; see also Hales, Windows, 101.)  


and in the [p. 5]
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JS, “Joseph Smith Jrs Book for Record,” Journal, Nov. 1832–Dec. 1834; handwriting of Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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, JS, Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, Parley P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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, Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
, Freeman Nickerson

2/12 Apr. 1806–16/14 Sept. 1862. Merchant, farmer. Born at Cavendish, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Freeman Nickerson and Huldah Chapman. Moved to Dayton, Cattaraugus Co., New York, mid 1820s. Moved to Mount Pleasant, Brantford Township, Wentworth Co. (later...

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, and six unidentified scribes; ninety-three pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes redactions, use marks, and archival marking.
Pocket-size memorandum book, 5⅞ × 3¾ × ¼ inches (15 × 10 × 1 cm). The text block consists of fifty-four leaves measuring 5⅞ × 3⅝ inches (15 × 9 cm). There are four gatherings of six sheets each of ledger paper. Each sheet is folded so that each gathering has twelve leaves (twenty-four pages). These pages are ruled with sixteen blue horizontal lines—now almost entirely faded—as well as with red vertical lines for recording financial information. The endpapers consist of pastedowns on the inside covers and two free flyleaves in both the front and back. The gatherings are sewn all along on sawn-in cords. The front and back covers of the journal are pasteboard. The ledger has a tight-back case binding with a black calfskin quarter-leather binding. The outside covers are adorned in Schrottel marbled paper, with gray body and veins of black and blue. The volume originally had three leather loops—two in the back and one in the front—that were tipped in between the inside covers and the pastedowns. The former presence of the front cover loop, no longer extant, is evident from creasing and staining on the pastedown, which is now detached. The leather loops and their spacing allowed for the book to be fastened by inserting a pencil between all three loops. The vibrant blue veins and the grain of the marbling, now greatly diminished by water damage, are also visible under the now loose front pastedown.
JS wrote “Joseph Smith 1832.<3–4>” on the front cover in brown ink. On the front pastedown, “Joseph Smith” is written sideways, running upward near the bottom of the outer edge. Also, “Joseph” is written sideways, running downward, near the top of the inside of the same page. The handwriting of these inscriptions has not been identified. The journal entries begin on the recto of the second leaf (the first flyleaf) and end on the recto of the back pastedown, making 105 numbered pages. Regular journal entries, inscribed in various shades of brown ink, continue through page 93. Pages 94 to 102 are blank except for page 98, which has JS’s name in graphite pencil at the top in JS’s handwriting. Pages 103–105 record subscriptions, which were evidently solicited during JS’s 26 February–28 March 1834 New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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mission, as well as a note apparently inscribed on 20 April 1834 in preparation for the conference held 20–21 April 1834 at Norton

Area first settled, 1814. Formed from Wolf Creek Township, 1818. Reported location of “great Mormon excitement,” 1832–1838. Population in 1830 about 650. Primarily populated by immigrants from New England states. Increased German Pennsylvanian immigration...

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, Ohio. The book has suffered from water and mud damage, evidenced in part by some extremely faded ink on page 2. Glue from tipping in a damaged leaf has also obscured several characters in the gutter of page 2.
The journal’s textual redactions and use marks, in graphite pencil, were made by later scribes who used the journal to produce the multivolume manuscript history of the church. This occurred in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, indicating the journal remained in JS’s possession. The journal is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.1

“Schedule of Church Records. Nauvoo 1846,” [1]; Historian’s Office, [7] “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


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