27467

Journal, 1835–1836

on monday the 9th Mr. Beeman Alvah Beman

22 May 1775–15 Nov. 1837. Farmer. Born at New Marlboro, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Reuben Beman and Mariam. Married Sarah (Sally) Burt, 18 Aug. 1796. Moved to what became Livonia, Ontario Co., New York, 1799. Moved to Avon, Livingston Co., New York...

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of [blank] N.Y

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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came here to ask advice of me concerning purchasing lands, whether it is best for him to purchase in this vicinity and move into this church, or not, he says that he cannot arrange his buisness so as to go to the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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next spring; I advised him to come here, and settle untill he could move to Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

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11 November 1835 • Wednesday

Wednesday Morning 11th. at home attended School

A term occasionally used to refer to a Protestant seminary; specifically used by JS to refer to a school to prepare elders of the church for their ministry. A December 1832 revelation directed JS and the elders of the church in Kirtland, Ohio, to establish...

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during school Hours, returned home and spent the evening, around my fire-side, teaching my family the science of grammar; it commensed snowing this afternon, the wind is verry heavy indeed

12 November 1835 • Thursday

Thursday 12th attended school

A term occasionally used to refer to a Protestant seminary; specifically used by JS to refer to a school to prepare elders of the church for their ministry. A December 1832 revelation directed JS and the elders of the church in Kirtland, Ohio, to establish...

View Glossary
again, during school Hours, rain & snow is still falling, it is about one inch in depth, the wind is verry heavy, and the weather extremly unpleasant, the labours laborers who commenced finishing the out side of the Chappel

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

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were oblieged to brake off from their buisness at the commencement of this storm viz on the 11th.. they commenced plasturing and finishing the out side on Monday the 2. Inst. this job is let to Artemus Millet

11 Sept. 1790–19 Nov. 1874. Farmer, lumberman, merchant, builder, stonemason. Born at Westmoreland, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of Ebenezer Millet and Catherine Dryden. Moved to Stockbridge, Windsor Co., Vermont, fall 1800; to Shelburn, Chittendon Co...

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& L[orenzo ] Young

19 Oct. 1807–21 Nov. 1895. Farmer, plasterer, gardener, blacksmith, nurseryman. Born at Smyrna, Chenango Co., New York. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Married Persis Goodall, 6 June 1826, at Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York. Baptized into LDS...

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, at $1,000 they have progressed rapidly since they commenced93

Millet, a stonemason, was baptized by Lorenzo Young’s brother Brigham. Apparently at Brigham Young’s suggestion, Hyrum Smith, a member of the temple committee, wrote to Millet instructing him to move to Kirtland to work on the House of the Lord. Millet’s son Joseph later recounted that his father was also asked to donate one thousand dollars toward construction. The contract to plaster the exterior may have functioned as something of a repayment. (See Erekson and Newell, “Conversion of Artemus Millet,” 79–81, 91–92.)  


Jacob Bump

1791–by 10 Oct. 1865. Brickmason, plasterer, carpenter, mechanic, farmer, craftsman. Born at Butternuts, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Asa Bump and Lydia Dandley. Married Abigail Pettingill, ca. 1811. Moved to Meadville, Crawford Co., Pennsylvania, by 1826...

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has the job of plastering the inside of the house

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

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through, out at $15.00.94

Bump received fifteen hundred dollars for his labor on the House of the Lord. (JS History, vol. B-1, 684.)  


he commenced on Monday the 9th. and is continueing it notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather. This evening viz the 12th at 6 oclock meet with the council of 12

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

View Glossary
. by their request, 9 of them were present [p. 30]
on monday th[e] 9th Mr. Beeman [Alvah Beman]

22 May 1775–15 Nov. 1837. Farmer. Born at New Marlboro, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Reuben Beman and Mariam. Married Sarah (Sally) Burt, 18 Aug. 1796. Moved to what became Livonia, Ontario Co., New York, 1799. Moved to Avon, Livingston Co., New York...

View Full Bio
of [blank]  N.Y

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

More Info
came here to ask advice of me concerning  purchasing lands, whether it is best for him to  purchase in this vicinity and move into this  church, or not, he says that he cannot arrange  his buisness so as to go to the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
next  spring; I advised him to come here, and  settle untill he could move to Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary

11 November 1835 • Wednesday

Wednesday Morning 11th. at home  attended School

A term occasionally used to refer to a Protestant seminary; specifically used by JS to refer to a school to prepare elders of the church for their ministry. A December 1832 revelation directed JS and the elders of the church in Kirtland, Ohio, to establish...

View Glossary
during school Hours, returned  home and spent the evening, around my  fire-side, teaching my family the science of  grammar; it commensed snowing this after non, the wind is verry heavy indeed

12 November 1835 • Thursday

Thursday 12th attended school

A term occasionally used to refer to a Protestant seminary; specifically used by JS to refer to a school to prepare elders of the church for their ministry. A December 1832 revelation directed JS and the elders of the church in Kirtland, Ohio, to establish...

View Glossary
 again, during school Hours, rain & snow is  still falling, it is about one inch in dept[h], the  wind is verry heavy, and the weather extremly  unpleasant, the labours [laborers] who commenced finis hing the out side of the house Chappel

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
were  oblieged to brake off from their buisness at  the commencement of this storm viz on the 11th..  they commenced plasturing and finishing the  out side on Monday the 2. Inst. this job is let  to A[rtemus] Millet

11 Sept. 1790–19 Nov. 1874. Farmer, lumberman, merchant, builder, stonemason. Born at Westmoreland, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of Ebenezer Millet and Catherine Dryden. Moved to Stockbridge, Windsor Co., Vermont, fall 1800; to Shelburn, Chittendon Co...

View Full Bio
& L[orenzo ] Young

19 Oct. 1807–21 Nov. 1895. Farmer, plasterer, gardener, blacksmith, nurseryman. Born at Smyrna, Chenango Co., New York. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Married Persis Goodall, 6 June 1826, at Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York. Baptized into LDS...

View Full Bio
, <at $1,000> they have progressed  rapidly since they commenced93

Millet, a stonemason, was baptized by Lorenzo Young’s brother Brigham. Apparently at Brigham Young’s suggestion, Hyrum Smith, a member of the temple committee, wrote to Millet instructing him to move to Kirtland to work on the House of the Lord. Millet’s son Joseph later recounted that his father was also asked to donate one thousand dollars toward construction. The contract to plaster the exterior may have functioned as something of a repayment. (See Erekson and Newell, “Conversion of Artemus Millet,” 79–81, 91–92.)  


J[acob] Bump

1791–by 10 Oct. 1865. Brickmason, plasterer, carpenter, mechanic, farmer, craftsman. Born at Butternuts, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Asa Bump and Lydia Dandley. Married Abigail Pettingill, ca. 1811. Moved to Meadville, Crawford Co., Pennsylvania, by 1826...

View Full Bio
has the job of plastering  the inside of the house

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
through, out at  $15.00.94

Bump received fifteen hundred dollars for his labor on the House of the Lord. (JS History, vol. B-1, 684.)  


he commenced on Monday the 9th.  and is continueing it notwithstanding the  inclemency of the weather. This evening viz  the 12th at 6 oclock meet with the council of  12

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

View Glossary
. by their request, 9 of them were present [p. 30]
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JS, “Sketch Book for the use of Joseph Smith, jr.,” Journal, Sept. 1835–Apr. 1836; handwriting of Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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, an unidentified scribe, Sylvester Smith

25 Mar. 1806–22 Feb. 1880. Farmer, carpenter, lawyer, realtor. Born at Tyringham, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Chileab Smith and Nancy Marshall. Moved to Amherst, Lorain Co., Ohio, ca. 1815. Married Elizabeth Frank, 27 Dec. 1827, likely in Chautauque...

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, Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, Warren Cowdery

17 Oct. 1788–23 Feb. 1851. Physician, druggist, farmer, editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Married Patience Simonds, 22 Sept. 1814, in Pawlet, Rutland Co. Moved to Freedom, Cattaraugus Co., New York, 1816...

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, JS, and Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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; 195 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
The text block consists of 114 leaves—including single flyleaves and pastedowns in the front and back—measuring 12¼ x 8 inches (31 x 20 cm). The 110 interior leaves are ledger paper with thirty-four lines in faint—and now faded—black ink that has turned brown. There are nine gatherings of various sizes—each about a dozen leaves per gathering. The text block is sewn all along over cloth tapes. The front and back covers of the journal are pasteboard. The ledger has a tight-back case binding with a brown calfskin quarter-leather binding. The outside covers are adorned in shell marbled paper, with dark green body and veins of light green. The bound volume measures 12⅜ x 8¼ inches (31 x 21 cm) and is 13/16 inches (2 cm) thick. One cover of the book is labeled “Repentence.” in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains eight lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to Repentince”. The spine has “No 8” inscribed upside up when the book is standing upright for this side. When the volume is turned upside down and flipped front to back, the other cover is titled “Sabbath Day” with “No 9” written beneath in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains two lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to the Sabbath day”. Thus the book was used to simultaneously house two volumes of topical notes on biblical passages. This book was apparently part of a larger series that included at least two other extant volumes—one bearing “Faith” and “10” on the cover, and the other bearing “Second Comeing of Christ” and “No 3” on one cover and “Gift of the Holy Ghost” on the other cover.1

“Grammar & Aphabet of the Egyptian Language,” Kirtland Egyptian Papers, ca. 1835–1836, CHL; Kirtland Elders Quorum, “Record”.  


In late 1835, JS and scribes began using the book to record his journal for 1835–1836, which begins on the recto of the second leaf of ledger paper. Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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added the title “Sketch Book” to the cover, beneath “Repentence.”.
The entire journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown. Pages 25, 51, 77, 103, 129, and 154 bear the marks of adhesive wafers that were probably used to attach manuscripts until they were copied into the journal. The journal was used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, in 1843 as a major source in composing JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. At this time, redactions were made in ink and in graphite pencil, and use marks were made in graphite. Also, apparently in Nauvoo, the cover of the journal side of the book was marked with a “D” and then with a larger, stylized “D”. At some point a white paper spine label was added with “1835–6 <Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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> JOURNAL” hand printed or stenciled in black ink that later turned brown. The insertion “Kirtland” is written in graphite. Also, in the “Repentence” side of the volume, the rectos of the third through eighth leaves of ledger paper are numbered on the upper right-hand corners as 195, 197, 199, 201, 203, and 205—all written in graphite and apparently redactions. Except with regard to the title “Sketch Book”, none of the authors of the inscriptions mentioned previously have been identified. This volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.2

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [1], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


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