27467

Journal, 1835–1836

30 November 1835 • Monday

Monday morning 30th yet the snow is falling, and is sufficiently deep for sleighing,140

The snow and frozen rivers of winter often made travel easier than did the furrowed, muddy roads of other seasons. Wintertime in agrarian communities provided more leisure time for travel and visiting.  


this is an uncommon storm for this country, at this season of the year
spent the day in writing a letter for the Messenger & Advocate on the Subject of the Gathering

As directed by early revelations, church members “gathered” in communities. A revelation dated September 1830, for instance, instructed elders “to bring to pass the gathering of mine elect” who would “be gathered in unto one place, upon the face of this land...

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;—141

This was the third in a series of three letters written by JS and published in successive issues of the LDS Messenger and Advocate to provide instruction for traveling elders. The third letter contained an exegesis of Jesus’s parables in Matthew 13, which JS applied to the establishment of the kingdom of God in the last days. (JS, “To the Elders of the Church of Latter Day Saints,” LDS Messenger and Advocate, Dec. 1835, 2:225–230; see also Sept. 1835, 1:179–182; and Nov. 1835, 2:209–212.)  


this afternoon, Henry Capron

14 Mar. 1815–18 Jan. 1865. Farmer, town officer. Born in New York. Son of Joseph Capron and Sabra Avery. Moved to Perrinton, Ontario Co., New York, by 1820. Lived next to JS’s family at Manchester, Ontario Co. Visited JS, 30 Nov. 1835, in Kirtland, Geauga...

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called to see me, he is an old acquaintance of mine, from Manchester

Settled 1793. Formed as Burt Township when divided from Farmington Township, 31 Mar. 1821. Name changed to Manchester, 16 Apr. 1822. Included village of Manchester. Population in 1825 about 2,700. Population in 1830 about 2,800. JS reported first vision of...

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New York, shewed him the Egyptian records

1 December 1835 • Tuesday

Tuesday December 1st 1835, at home spent the day in writing, for the Messenger & Advocate, the snow is falling and we have fine sleighing.142

When Warren Parrish copied JS’s journal into the contemporaneous history, he omitted this entry for 1 December and instead copied in a revised version of the journal entry for 2 December. (JS History, 1834–1836, 138–139.)  


2 December 1835 • Wednesday

Wednesday. 2ond a fine morning I made preparation, to ride to Painsvill Painesville

Located on Grand River twelve miles northeast of Kirtland. Created and settled, 1800. Originally named Champion. Flourished economically from harbor on Lake Erie and as major route of overland travel for western emigration. Included Painesville village; laid...

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, with my wife

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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and , family, also my Scribe

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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,143

JS History, 1834–1836, 138, states that he was joined by his family and by “some others of his house hold.”  


we had our sleigh and horses, prepared and set out, when we were passing through Mentor Street

Road running southwest from Painesville to Mentor and on to Willoughby. Intersected at Mentor with road leading south to Kirtland. JS took family on sleigh ride over part of road, 2 Dec. 1835.

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, we overtook a team with two men on the sleigh. I politely asked them to let me pass, they granted my request, and as we passed them, they bawled out, do you get any revelation lately, with an adition of blackguard that I did not understand, this is a fair sample of the character of Mentor Street

Road running southwest from Painesville to Mentor and on to Willoughby. Intersected at Mentor with road leading south to Kirtland. JS took family on sleigh ride over part of road, 2 Dec. 1835.

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inhabitants,144

Mentor Street (now Mentor Avenue) ran northeast from Mentor to Painesville. Before joining with the Latter-day Saints, Sidney Rigdon led the Reformed Baptist congregation in Mentor, some of whom now deeply resented the new religion that had taken Rigdon and many from the neighboring Kirtland congregation. On Mentor-based opposition to the Mormons in 1835, see Adams, “Grandison Newell’s Obsession,” 170–173.  


who are ready to abuse and scandalize, men who never laid a straw in their way, and infact those whos faces they never saw, and cannot, bring an acusation, against, either [p. 53]

30 November 1835 • Monday

Monday morning 30th yet the snow  is falling, and is sufficiently deep for  sleighing,140

The snow and frozen rivers of winter often made travel easier than did the furrowed, muddy roads of other seasons. Wintertime in agrarian communities provided more leisure time for travel and visiting.  


this is an uncommon storm for  this country, at this season of the year
spent the day in writing a letter for the  Messenger & Advocate on the Subject of  the Gathering

As directed by early revelations, church members “gathered” in communities. A revelation dated September 1830, for instance, instructed elders “to bring to pass the gathering of mine elect” who would “be gathered in unto one place, upon the face of this land...

View Glossary
;—141

This was the third in a series of three letters written by JS and published in successive issues of the LDS Messenger and Advocate to provide instruction for traveling elders. The third letter contained an exegesis of Jesus’s parables in Matthew 13, which JS applied to the establishment of the kingdom of God in the last days. (JS, “To the Elders of the Church of Latter Day Saints,” LDS Messenger and Advocate, Dec. 1835, 2:225–230; see also Sept. 1835, 1:179–182; and Nov. 1835, 2:209–212.)  


this afternoon, Henry  Capron

14 Mar. 1815–18 Jan. 1865. Farmer, town officer. Born in New York. Son of Joseph Capron and Sabra Avery. Moved to Perrinton, Ontario Co., New York, by 1820. Lived next to JS’s family at Manchester, Ontario Co. Visited JS, 30 Nov. 1835, in Kirtland, Geauga...

View Full Bio
called to see me, he is an old  acquaintance of mine, from Manchester

Settled 1793. Formed as Burt Township when divided from Farmington Township, 31 Mar. 1821. Name changed to Manchester, 16 Apr. 1822. Included village of Manchester. Population in 1825 about 2,700. Population in 1830 about 2,800. JS reported first vision of...

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 New York, shewed him the Egyptian re cords

1 December 1835 • Tuesday

Tuesday December 1st 1835, at home  spent the day in writing, for the M[essenger] & Advoc ate, the snow is falling and we have fine  sleighing.142

When Warren Parrish copied JS’s journal into the contemporaneous history, he omitted this entry for 1 December and instead copied in a revised version of the journal entry for 2 December. (JS History, 1834–1836, 138–139.)  


2 December 1835 • Wednesday

Wednesday. 2ond a fine morning  I made preparation, to ride to Painsvill [Painesville]

Located on Grand River twelve miles northeast of Kirtland. Created and settled, 1800. Originally named Champion. Flourished economically from harbor on Lake Erie and as major route of overland travel for western emigration. Included Painesville village; laid...

More Info
, with  my wife

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
and children, family, also my Scr ibe

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

View Full Bio
,143

JS History, 1834–1836, 138, states that he was joined by his family and by “some others of his house hold.”  


we had our sleigh and horses, prepared  and set out, when we arived were passing  through Mentor Street

Road running southwest from Painesville to Mentor and on to Willoughby. Intersected at Mentor with road leading south to Kirtland. JS took family on sleigh ride over part of road, 2 Dec. 1835.

More Info
, we overtook a team  with two men on the sleigh. I politely asked  them to let me pass, they granted my req uest, and as we passed them, they bawled  out, do you get any revelation lately, with  an adition of blackguard that I did not  understand, this is a fair sample of the  character of Mentor Street

Road running southwest from Painesville to Mentor and on to Willoughby. Intersected at Mentor with road leading south to Kirtland. JS took family on sleigh ride over part of road, 2 Dec. 1835.

More Info
inhabitants,144

Mentor Street (now Mentor Avenue) ran northeast from Mentor to Painesville. Before joining with the Latter-day Saints, Sidney Rigdon led the Reformed Baptist congregation in Mentor, some of whom now deeply resented the new religion that had taken Rigdon and many from the neighboring Kirtland congregation. On Mentor-based opposition to the Mormons in 1835, see Adams, “Grandison Newell’s Obsession,” 170–173.  


who  are ready to abuse and scandalize, men  who never laid a straw in their way, and  infact those whos faces they never saw, and  cannot, bring an acusation, against, either [p. 53]
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JS, “Sketch Book for the use of Joseph Smith, jr.,” Journal, Sept. 1835–Apr. 1836; handwriting of Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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, an unidentified scribe, Sylvester Smith

25 Mar. 1806–22 Feb. 1880. Farmer, carpenter, lawyer, realtor. Born at Tyringham, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Chileab Smith and Nancy Marshall. Moved to Amherst, Lorain Co., Ohio, ca. 1815. Married Elizabeth Frank, 27 Dec. 1827, likely in Chautauque...

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, Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, Warren Cowdery

17 Oct. 1788–23 Feb. 1851. Physician, druggist, farmer, editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Married Patience Simonds, 22 Sept. 1814, in Pawlet, Rutland Co. Moved to Freedom, Cattaraugus Co., New York, 1816...

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, JS, and Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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; 195 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
The text block consists of 114 leaves—including single flyleaves and pastedowns in the front and back—measuring 12¼ x 8 inches (31 x 20 cm). The 110 interior leaves are ledger paper with thirty-four lines in faint—and now faded—black ink that has turned brown. There are nine gatherings of various sizes—each about a dozen leaves per gathering. The text block is sewn all along over cloth tapes. The front and back covers of the journal are pasteboard. The ledger has a tight-back case binding with a brown calfskin quarter-leather binding. The outside covers are adorned in shell marbled paper, with dark green body and veins of light green. The bound volume measures 12⅜ x 8¼ inches (31 x 21 cm) and is 13/16 inches (2 cm) thick. One cover of the book is labeled “Repentence.” in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains eight lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to Repentince”. The spine has “No 8” inscribed upside up when the book is standing upright for this side. When the volume is turned upside down and flipped front to back, the other cover is titled “Sabbath Day” with “No 9” written beneath in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains two lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to the Sabbath day”. Thus the book was used to simultaneously house two volumes of topical notes on biblical passages. This book was apparently part of a larger series that included at least two other extant volumes—one bearing “Faith” and “10” on the cover, and the other bearing “Second Comeing of Christ” and “No 3” on one cover and “Gift of the Holy Ghost” on the other cover.1

“Grammar & Aphabet of the Egyptian Language,” Kirtland Egyptian Papers, ca. 1835–1836, CHL; Kirtland Elders Quorum, “Record”.  


In late 1835, JS and scribes began using the book to record his journal for 1835–1836, which begins on the recto of the second leaf of ledger paper. Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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added the title “Sketch Book” to the cover, beneath “Repentence.”.
The entire journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown. Pages 25, 51, 77, 103, 129, and 154 bear the marks of adhesive wafers that were probably used to attach manuscripts until they were copied into the journal. The journal was used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, in 1843 as a major source in composing JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. At this time, redactions were made in ink and in graphite pencil, and use marks were made in graphite. Also, apparently in Nauvoo, the cover of the journal side of the book was marked with a “D” and then with a larger, stylized “D”. At some point a white paper spine label was added with “1835–6 <Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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> JOURNAL” hand printed or stenciled in black ink that later turned brown. The insertion “Kirtland” is written in graphite. Also, in the “Repentence” side of the volume, the rectos of the third through eighth leaves of ledger paper are numbered on the upper right-hand corners as 195, 197, 199, 201, 203, and 205—all written in graphite and apparently redactions. Except with regard to the title “Sketch Book”, none of the authors of the inscriptions mentioned previously have been identified. This volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.2

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [1], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


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