27467

Journal, 1835–1836

upon each others heads, and cursings upon the enimies of Christ who inhabit Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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Missouri continued prophesying and blessing and sealing

To confirm or solemnize. In the early 1830s, revelations often adopted biblical usage of the term seal; for example, “sealed up the testimony” referred to proselytizing and testifying of the gospel as a warning of the approaching end time. JS explained in...

View Glossary
them with Hosanna

A Hebrew cry to God for help also used in the New Testament to give acclaim. An exultant, formulaic “Hosanna Shout,” uttered in unison by all present, occurred several times in the House of the Lord in Kirtland, Ohio, both in meetings leading up to and during...

View Glossary
and Amen until nearly 7 o clock P.M.396

Edward Partridge recorded that “the priests teachers & deacons [were] in one corner the vails having been let down, and the other officers occupied the rest of the lower room.” Stephen Post reported that “the washing was commenced by the presidents who first washed the 12 & the 7 presidents of the seventies the 12 & 7 then commenced washing until the whole were washed.” According to Partridge, “The washing of feet was performed by noon, then they began to prophecy and speak in tongues adding shouts of hosanna, to God and the Lamb with amen and amen this continued till dark.” Similarly, Post recorded that the men “prophesied, spake and sang in tongues” in the four parts of the curtained lower court. (Partridge, Journal, 30 Mar. 1836; Post, Journal, 30 Mar. 1836.)  


the bread & wine

Primarily referred to the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper, or Communion, as opposed to other religious sacraments. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed “that the church meet together often to partake of bread and wine in remembrance of the Lord...

View Glossary
was then brought in, and I observed that we had fasted all the day; and lest we faint; as the Saviour did so shall we do on this occasion, we shall bless the bread and give it to the 12

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

View Glossary
and they to the multitude, after which we shall bless the wine and do likewise;397

An allusion not only to Matthew 15:32–38—when Jesus fed the multitude bread and fish “lest they faint”—but also to the Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 490–491, 496 [3 Nephi 18:1–11; 20:1–9]—when Jesus administered bread and wine as the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper. William W. Phelps wrote that “the sacrament was administered, as the feast of the Passover for the first time in more than 1800 years.”a Most Jews began their weeklong Passover celebrations two days later on the evening of 1 April.b Stephen Post recorded that the men “partook of bread & wine in commemoration of the marriage supper of the Lamb,” a phrase mentioned in Revelation 19:9 as a symbolic representation of the second coming of Jesus Christ.c In November 1835, JS taught that after the completion of the temple, Latter-day Saints would “stand in holy places ready to meet the bride groom when he comes.”d  


aW. Phelps to S. Phelps, Apr. 1836; compare Snow, Journal, [24].

bRicks, “Appearance of Elijah and Moses,” 484–485.

cPost, Journal, 30 Mar. 1836.

dJS, Journal, 12 Nov. 1835.

while waiting I made the following remarks, that the time that we were required to tarry in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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to be endued

The terms endow, endowed, and endowment—as well as endued and enduement—were used to describe the bestowal of spiritual blessings upon the Latter-day Saints. In common usage, these terms meant essentially the same thing: to clothe, to put on, to furnish, ...

View Glossary
would be fulfilled in a few days,398

William W. Phelps wrote that the jubilee and Passover that began at the solemn assembly ended a week later on 6 April, which date was “set apart as a day of prayer, to end The feast of the passover. and in honor of the Jubilee of the church: it being Six years to this day.” However, Phelps also wrote that elders began leaving Kirtland on 1 April. (W. Phelps to S. Phelps, Apr. 1836; see also Partridge, Journal, 6 Apr. 1836.)  


and then the Elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
would go forth and each must stand for himself, that it was not necessary for them to be sent out two by two as in former times;399

John Corrill later explained that now “every man was accountable to God for his own doings.”a Previous revelations instructed Latter-day Saint elders to travel “two by two” according to New Testament pattern,b although some elders, such as Peter Dustin, traveled alone.c In the months following the endowment, William E. McLellin, Erastus Snow, and perhaps others proselytized alone, but this change in practice apparently became neither widespread nor long standing.d  


aCorrill, Brief History, 26.

bRevelation, 9 Feb. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 13:2, 1835 ed. [D&C 42:6]; Revelation, 6 June 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 66:3, 1835 ed. [D&C 52:10]; Mark 6:7; Luke 10:1.

cWilliam W. Phelps, Kirtland Mills, OH, to Sally Phelps, Liberty, MO, 16–18 Sept. 1835, private possession, copy in CHL.

dErastus Snow, Kirtland, OH, 30 Dec. 1836, Letter to the editor, LDS Messenger and Advocate, Jan. 1837, 3:440; McLellin, Journal, Apr.–June 1836.

but to go in all meekness in sobriety and preach Jesus Christ & him crucified not to contend with others on the account of their faith or systems of religion but pursue a steady course, this I delivered by way of commandment, and all that observe them not will pull down persecution upon thier heads, while those who do shall always be filled with the Holy Ghost, this I pronounced as a prophesy, sealed with a Hosanna & amen. Also that the seventies

An office in the Melchizedek Priesthood patterned after the seventy envoys called by Jesus in the New Testament. The first members of the Quorum of the Seventy were called in February 1835. Revelation stipulated that “the seventy are also called to preach...

View Glossary
are not called to serve tables400

That is, to involve themselves in local ministry—see Acts 6:1–4.  


or preside over churches to settle difficulties, but to preach the gospel and build them up, and set others who do not belong to these quorums

An organized group of individuals holding the same office in the Melchizedek priesthood or the Aaronic priesthood. According to the 1835 “Instruction on Priesthood,” the presidency of the church constituted a quorum. The Twelve Apostles also formed a quorum...

View Glossary
to preside over them who are high priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

View Glossary
the twelve

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

View Glossary
also are not to serve tables, but to bear the keys

Authority or knowledge of God given to humankind. In the earliest records, the term keys primarily referred to JS’s authority to unlock the “mysteries of the kingdom.” Early revelations declared that both JS and Oliver Cowdery held the keys to bring forth...

View Glossary
of the kingdom to all nations, and unlock them and call upon the seventies to follow after them and assist them. The 12 are at liberty to go wheresoever they will [p. 188]
upon each others heads, and cursings upon the  enimies of Christ who inhabit Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
Missouri  continued prophesying and blessing and sealing

To confirm or solemnize. In the early 1830s, revelations often adopted biblical usage of the term seal; for example, “sealed up the testimony” referred to proselytizing and testifying of the gospel as a warning of the approaching end time. JS explained in...

View Glossary
them  with Hosanna

A Hebrew cry to God for help also used in the New Testament to give acclaim. An exultant, formulaic “Hosanna Shout,” uttered in unison by all present, occurred several times in the House of the Lord in Kirtland, Ohio, both in meetings leading up to and during...

View Glossary
and Amen until nearly 7 o clock P.M.396

Edward Partridge recorded that “the priests teachers & deacons [were] in one corner the vails having been let down, and the other officers occupied the rest of the lower room.” Stephen Post reported that “the washing was commenced by the presidents who first washed the 12 & the 7 presidents of the seventies the 12 & 7 then commenced washing until the whole were washed.” According to Partridge, “The washing of feet was performed by noon, then they began to prophecy and speak in tongues adding shouts of hosanna, to God and the Lamb with amen and amen this continued till dark.” Similarly, Post recorded that the men “prophesied, spake and sang in tongues” in the four parts of the curtained lower court. (Partridge, Journal, 30 Mar. 1836; Post, Journal, 30 Mar. 1836.)  


 the bread <& wine>

Primarily referred to the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper, or Communion, as opposed to other religious sacraments. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed “that the church meet together often to partake of bread and wine in remembrance of the Lord...

View Glossary
was then brought in, and I observed that  we had fasted all the day; and lest we faint; as  the Saviour did so shall we do on this occasion, we  shall bless the bread and give it to the 12

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

View Glossary
and they  to the multitude, after which we shall bless the wine  and do likewise;397

An allusion not only to Matthew 15:32–38—when Jesus fed the multitude bread and fish “lest they faint”—but also to the Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 490–491, 496 [3 Nephi 18:1–11; 20:1–9]—when Jesus administered bread and wine as the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper. William W. Phelps wrote that “the sacrament was administered, as the feast of the Passover for the first time in more than 1800 years.”a Most Jews began their weeklong Passover celebrations two days later on the evening of 1 April.b Stephen Post recorded that the men “partook of bread & wine in commemoration of the marriage supper of the Lamb,” a phrase mentioned in Revelation 19:9 as a symbolic representation of the second coming of Jesus Christ.c In November 1835, JS taught that after the completion of the temple, Latter-day Saints would “stand in holy places ready to meet the bride groom when he comes.”d  


aW. Phelps to S. Phelps, Apr. 1836; compare Snow, Journal, [24].

bRicks, “Appearance of Elijah and Moses,” 484–485.

cPost, Journal, 30 Mar. 1836.

dJS, Journal, 12 Nov. 1835.

while waiting for the wine I made  the following remarks, that the time that we were requi red to tarry in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
to be endued

The terms endow, endowed, and endowment—as well as endued and enduement—were used to describe the bestowal of spiritual blessings upon the Latter-day Saints. In common usage, these terms meant essentially the same thing: to clothe, to put on, to furnish, ...

View Glossary
would be  fulfilled in a few days,398

William W. Phelps wrote that the jubilee and Passover that began at the solemn assembly ended a week later on 6 April, which date was “set apart as a day of prayer, to end The feast of the passover. and in honor of the Jubilee of the church: it being Six years to this day.” However, Phelps also wrote that elders began leaving Kirtland on 1 April. (W. Phelps to S. Phelps, Apr. 1836; see also Partridge, Journal, 6 Apr. 1836.)  


and then the Elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
would  go forth and each must stand for himself, that it  was not necessary for them to be sent out two by two  as in former times;399

John Corrill later explained that now “every man was accountable to God for his own doings.”a Previous revelations instructed Latter-day Saint elders to travel “two by two” according to New Testament pattern,b although some elders, such as Peter Dustin, traveled alone.c In the months following the endowment, William E. McLellin, Erastus Snow, and perhaps others proselytized alone, but this change in practice apparently became neither widespread nor long standing.d  


aCorrill, Brief History, 26.

bRevelation, 9 Feb. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 13:2, 1835 ed. [D&C 42:6]; Revelation, 6 June 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 66:3, 1835 ed. [D&C 52:10]; Mark 6:7; Luke 10:1.

cWilliam W. Phelps, Kirtland Mills, OH, to Sally Phelps, Liberty, MO, 16–18 Sept. 1835, private possession, copy in CHL.

dErastus Snow, Kirtland, OH, 30 Dec. 1836, Letter to the editor, LDS Messenger and Advocate, Jan. 1837, 3:440; McLellin, Journal, Apr.–June 1836.

but to go in all meekness in  sobriety and preach Jesus Christ & him crucified not  to contend with others on the account of their faith  or systems of religion but pursue a steady course,  this I delivered by way of commandment, and all  that observe them not will pull down persecution  upon your <thier> heads, while those who do shall always  be filled with the Holy Ghost, this I pronounced  as a prophesy, sealed with a Hosanna & amen.  Also that the seventies

An office in the Melchizedek Priesthood patterned after the seventy envoys called by Jesus in the New Testament. The first members of the Quorum of the Seventy were called in February 1835. Revelation stipulated that “the seventy are also called to preach...

View Glossary
are not called to serve tables400

That is, to involve themselves in local ministry—see Acts 6:1–4.  


 or preside over churches to settle difficulties, but to  preach the gospel and build them up, and set others  who do not belong to these quorums

An organized group of individuals holding the same office in the Melchizedek priesthood or the Aaronic priesthood. According to the 1835 “Instruction on Priesthood,” the presidency of the church constituted a quorum. The Twelve Apostles also formed a quorum...

View Glossary
to preside over  them who are high priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

View Glossary
the twelve

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

View Glossary
also are not  to serve tables, but to bear the keys

Authority or knowledge of God given to humankind. In the earliest records, the term keys primarily referred to JS’s authority to unlock the “mysteries of the kingdom.” Early revelations declared that both JS and Oliver Cowdery held the keys to bring forth...

View Glossary
of the kingdom  to all nations, and unlock them and call upon  the seventies to follow after them and assist them.  The 12 are at liberty to go wheresoever they will [p. 188]
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JS, “Sketch Book for the use of Joseph Smith, jr.,” Journal, Sept. 1835–Apr. 1836; handwriting of Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

View Full Bio
, an unidentified scribe, Sylvester Smith

25 Mar. 1806–22 Feb. 1880. Farmer, carpenter, lawyer, realtor. Born at Tyringham, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Chileab Smith and Nancy Marshall. Moved to Amherst, Lorain Co., Ohio, ca. 1815. Married Elizabeth Frank, 27 Dec. 1827, likely in Chautauque...

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, Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

View Full Bio
, Warren Cowdery

17 Oct. 1788–23 Feb. 1851. Physician, druggist, farmer, editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Married Patience Simonds, 22 Sept. 1814, in Pawlet, Rutland Co. Moved to Freedom, Cattaraugus Co., New York, 1816...

View Full Bio
, JS, and Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
; 195 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
The text block consists of 114 leaves—including single flyleaves and pastedowns in the front and back—measuring 12¼ x 8 inches (31 x 20 cm). The 110 interior leaves are ledger paper with thirty-four lines in faint—and now faded—black ink that has turned brown. There are nine gatherings of various sizes—each about a dozen leaves per gathering. The text block is sewn all along over cloth tapes. The front and back covers of the journal are pasteboard. The ledger has a tight-back case binding with a brown calfskin quarter-leather binding. The outside covers are adorned in shell marbled paper, with dark green body and veins of light green. The bound volume measures 12⅜ x 8¼ inches (31 x 21 cm) and is 13/16 inches (2 cm) thick. One cover of the book is labeled “Repentence.” in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains eight lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to Repentince”. The spine has “No 8” inscribed upside up when the book is standing upright for this side. When the volume is turned upside down and flipped front to back, the other cover is titled “Sabbath Day” with “No 9” written beneath in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains two lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to the Sabbath day”. Thus the book was used to simultaneously house two volumes of topical notes on biblical passages. This book was apparently part of a larger series that included at least two other extant volumes—one bearing “Faith” and “10” on the cover, and the other bearing “Second Comeing of Christ” and “No 3” on one cover and “Gift of the Holy Ghost” on the other cover.1

“Grammar & Aphabet of the Egyptian Language,” Kirtland Egyptian Papers, ca. 1835–1836, CHL; Kirtland Elders Quorum, “Record”.  


In late 1835, JS and scribes began using the book to record his journal for 1835–1836, which begins on the recto of the second leaf of ledger paper. Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

View Full Bio
added the title “Sketch Book” to the cover, beneath “Repentence.”.
The entire journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown. Pages 25, 51, 77, 103, 129, and 154 bear the marks of adhesive wafers that were probably used to attach manuscripts until they were copied into the journal. The journal was used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, in 1843 as a major source in composing JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. At this time, redactions were made in ink and in graphite pencil, and use marks were made in graphite. Also, apparently in Nauvoo, the cover of the journal side of the book was marked with a “D” and then with a larger, stylized “D”. At some point a white paper spine label was added with “1835–6 <Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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> JOURNAL” hand printed or stenciled in black ink that later turned brown. The insertion “Kirtland” is written in graphite. Also, in the “Repentence” side of the volume, the rectos of the third through eighth leaves of ledger paper are numbered on the upper right-hand corners as 195, 197, 199, 201, 203, and 205—all written in graphite and apparently redactions. Except with regard to the title “Sketch Book”, none of the authors of the inscriptions mentioned previously have been identified. This volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.2

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [1], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


Facts