27467

Journal, 1835–1836

ourselves, from all embarasments whatever that we may not be brought into disrepute, in any respect, that our enemys may not have any power over us;— spent the day at home, devoted some time in studying the hebrew, language.— this has been a warm day with, some rain; our snow is melting verry fast,— This evening, a Mr. John Hollister

12 Oct. 1792–1839. Farmer. Born at Marbletown, Ulster Co., New York. Son of Isaac Hollister and Elizabeth Newcomb. Married Lavina (Vina) Clearwater, ca. 1817. Lived at Tompkins Co., New York, ca. 1820–ca. 1835. Moved to Portage Co., Ohio, ca. 1835. Member...

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of Portage County

Located in northeastern Ohio. Settled by 1799. Established June 1807. Bordered by Geauga Co. on north. Pennsylvania and Ohio Canal ran through county; completed 1825. Population in 1830 about 19,000. Population in 1840 about 23,000. Included Portage and Hiram...

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Ohio called to see me on the subject of religion, he is a member of the close communion baptise Church,155

Closed Communion Baptists took the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper only with other Baptists. (Jeter, Baptist Principles Reset, chap. 13.)  


he said he had come to enquire concerning the faith of our church having heard many reports, of the worst character about us, he seemed to be an honest enquirer after truth. I spent the evening in talking with him, I found him to be an honest candid man, and no particular peculiarities about him, only his simplisity, he tarried overnight with me, and acknowledged in the morning that although he had thought he knew something about religion he was now sensible that he knew but little, which was the greatest, trait of wisdom that I could discover in him

5 December 1835 • Saturday

Saturday 5th the weather is cold and freezing, and the snow is falling moderately, and there is a prospect of sleighing again, spent the forenoon in studying, hebrew with Doct. Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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& President Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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, I am labouring under some indisposition of health laid down and slept a while, and [p. 56]
ourselves, from all the embarasments whatever  that we may not be brought into disre pute, in any respect, that our enemys may  not have any power over us;— spent the day  at home, devoted some time in studying <the> he brew, language.— this has been a warm  day with, some rain; our snow is melting  verry fast,— This evening, a Mr. John  Hol[l]ister

12 Oct. 1792–1839. Farmer. Born at Marbletown, Ulster Co., New York. Son of Isaac Hollister and Elizabeth Newcomb. Married Lavina (Vina) Clearwater, ca. 1817. Lived at Tompkins Co., New York, ca. 1820–ca. 1835. Moved to Portage Co., Ohio, ca. 1835. Member...

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of Portage County

Located in northeastern Ohio. Settled by 1799. Established June 1807. Bordered by Geauga Co. on north. Pennsylvania and Ohio Canal ran through county; completed 1825. Population in 1830 about 19,000. Population in 1840 about 23,000. Included Portage and Hiram...

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Ohio called to  see me on Saturday <the subject> of religion, he  is a member of the close communion ba ptise Church,155

Closed Communion Baptists took the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper only with other Baptists. (Jeter, Baptist Principles Reset, chap. 13.)  


he said he had come to  enquire concerning the faith of our church  having heard many reports, of the  worst character about us, he seemed to  be an honest enquirer after truth. I spent  the evening in talking with him, I found  him to be an honest candid man, and  no particular peculiarities about him, only  his simplisity, he tarried overnight with  me, and acknowledged in the <morning> that although  he had thought he knew something about  religion he was now sensible that he knew  but little, which was the greatest, trait of  wisdom that I could discover in him

5 December 1835 • Saturday

Saturday 5th the weather  is cold and freezing, and the snow is  falling moderately, and there is a pros pect of sleighing again, spent the fore noon in studying, hebrew with Doct.  [Frederick G.] Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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& President [Oliver] Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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, I am  labouring under some indisposition of health  laid down and slept a while, and [p. 56]
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JS, “Sketch Book for the use of Joseph Smith, jr.,” Journal, Sept. 1835–Apr. 1836; handwriting of Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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, an unidentified scribe, Sylvester Smith

25 Mar. 1806–22 Feb. 1880. Farmer, carpenter, lawyer, realtor. Born at Tyringham, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Chileab Smith and Nancy Marshall. Moved to Amherst, Lorain Co., Ohio, ca. 1815. Married Elizabeth Frank, 27 Dec. 1827, likely in Chautauque...

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, Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, Warren Cowdery

17 Oct. 1788–23 Feb. 1851. Physician, druggist, farmer, editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Married Patience Simonds, 22 Sept. 1814, in Pawlet, Rutland Co. Moved to Freedom, Cattaraugus Co., New York, 1816...

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, JS, and Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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; 195 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
The text block consists of 114 leaves—including single flyleaves and pastedowns in the front and back—measuring 12¼ x 8 inches (31 x 20 cm). The 110 interior leaves are ledger paper with thirty-four lines in faint—and now faded—black ink that has turned brown. There are nine gatherings of various sizes—each about a dozen leaves per gathering. The text block is sewn all along over cloth tapes. The front and back covers of the journal are pasteboard. The ledger has a tight-back case binding with a brown calfskin quarter-leather binding. The outside covers are adorned in shell marbled paper, with dark green body and veins of light green. The bound volume measures 12⅜ x 8¼ inches (31 x 21 cm) and is 13/16 inches (2 cm) thick. One cover of the book is labeled “Repentence.” in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains eight lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to Repentince”. The spine has “No 8” inscribed upside up when the book is standing upright for this side. When the volume is turned upside down and flipped front to back, the other cover is titled “Sabbath Day” with “No 9” written beneath in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains two lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to the Sabbath day”. Thus the book was used to simultaneously house two volumes of topical notes on biblical passages. This book was apparently part of a larger series that included at least two other extant volumes—one bearing “Faith” and “10” on the cover, and the other bearing “Second Comeing of Christ” and “No 3” on one cover and “Gift of the Holy Ghost” on the other cover.1

“Grammar & Aphabet of the Egyptian Language,” Kirtland Egyptian Papers, ca. 1835–1836, CHL; Kirtland Elders Quorum, “Record”.  


In late 1835, JS and scribes began using the book to record his journal for 1835–1836, which begins on the recto of the second leaf of ledger paper. Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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added the title “Sketch Book” to the cover, beneath “Repentence.”.
The entire journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown. Pages 25, 51, 77, 103, 129, and 154 bear the marks of adhesive wafers that were probably used to attach manuscripts until they were copied into the journal. The journal was used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, in 1843 as a major source in composing JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. At this time, redactions were made in ink and in graphite pencil, and use marks were made in graphite. Also, apparently in Nauvoo, the cover of the journal side of the book was marked with a “D” and then with a larger, stylized “D”. At some point a white paper spine label was added with “1835–6 <Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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> JOURNAL” hand printed or stenciled in black ink that later turned brown. The insertion “Kirtland” is written in graphite. Also, in the “Repentence” side of the volume, the rectos of the third through eighth leaves of ledger paper are numbered on the upper right-hand corners as 195, 197, 199, 201, 203, and 205—all written in graphite and apparently redactions. Except with regard to the title “Sketch Book”, none of the authors of the inscriptions mentioned previously have been identified. This volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.2

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [1], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


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