27470

Journal, 1839

to the world about great judgements but rather to preach the simple gospel— Explained concerning the coming of the son of Man &c that all will be raised to meet him but the righteous will remain with him in the cloud whilst all the proud and all that do wickedly will have to return to the earth, and suffer his vengeance which he will take upon them this is the second death &c &c
Also that it is a false idea that the saints will escape all the judgements whilst the wicked suffer— for all flesh is subject to suffer— and “the righteous shall hardly escape” still many of the saints will escape— for the just shall live by faith— yet many of the righteous shall fall a prey to disease to pestilence &c by reason of the weakness of the flesh and yet be saved in the kingdom of God So that it is an unhallowed principle to say that such and such have transgressed because they have been preyed upon by disease or death for all flesh is subject to death and the Saviour has said, “Judge not “lest ye be judged”.
All the fore part of this week at home and preparing for conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

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Thursday met in council and on
Saturday 5th October 1839 met in general conference

5 Oct. 1839

JS presided over general church conference at Commerce, Illinois, and stakes in Commerce area and Iowa.

which continued Saturday and Sunday— the assemb [p. [13]]
to the world about great judgements but rather  to preach the simple gospel— Explained con cerning the coming of the son of Man &c that  all will be raised to meet him62

See 1 Thessalonians 4:16–17.  


but the righte ous will remain with him in the cloud whilst  all the proud and all that do wickedly will  have to return to the earth, and suffer his  vengeance which he will take upon them  this is the second death &c &c
Also that it is a false idea that the saints  will escape all the judgements whilst  the wicked suffer— for all flesh is  subject to suffer— and “the righteous  shall hardly escape”63

An August 1831 apocalyptic revelation stated that “the saints also shall hardly escape.” (Revelation, 30 Aug. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 20:9, 1835 ed. [D&C 63:34].)  


still many of the  saints will escape— for the just shall  live by faith—64

See Romans 1:17; Galatians 3:11; and Hebrews 10:38.  


yet many of the right eous shall fall a prey to disease to pestilence  &c and yet &c by reason of the weakness of the flesh  and yet be saved in the kingdom of God65

Over a dozen Latter-day Saints living in and along the Mississippi River valley had died over the summer, including infants and children, JS’s uncle Silas Smith, and family members of close friends. (Obituary for Silas Smith, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:32; see various obituaries in Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839–Oct. 1840; see also Tullidge, Women of Mormondom, 213–214.)  


 So that it is an unhallowed principle  to say that such and such have trans gressed because they have been preyed  upon by disease or death for all flesh  is subject to death and the Saviour has  said, “Judge not “lest ye be judged”.66

See Matthew 7:1; and Luke 6:37.  


All the fore part of this week at home  and preparing for conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

View Glossary
Thurs day met in council and on
Saturday 5th October 1839 met in  general conference

5 Oct. 1839

JS presided over general church conference at Commerce, Illinois, and stakes in Commerce area and Iowa.

which continued  Saturday and Sunday—67

The conference continued into Monday, 7 October 1839. (Minutes, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:30–31.)  


the assemb [p. [13]]
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JS, “Minute Book. 1839 J. Smiths Journal Escape from Prison,” Journal, Apr.–Oct. 1839; handwriting of James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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; fifteen pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
Makeshift notebook, 10 x 4 inches (25 x 10 cm). The journal was fashioned by folding eight 10 x 8 inch (25 x 20 cm) sheets of paper in half lengthwise to form the notebook of sixteen leaves (thirty-two pages). Inscriptions that reach the end of a line and cross the gutter onto another leaf indicate that the folded pages were not sewn during their original use. Wear on the first and last pages indicates that the pages were not bound for some time. The text of the journal is inscribed on the first fifteen pages in black ink that later turned brown. The remaining seventeen pages are blank. At some point a cover for the notebook was made with a 10 x 16 inch (25 x 41 cm) sheet of blue-colored cover stock folded in half twice to create a 10 x 4 inch cover, which was then pamphlet bound with hand stitching. On the front cover, James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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wrote “Minute Book. | 1839 | J. Smiths Journal | Escape from Prison” with seven decorative underlines in black ink. On the back cover, the lines “Joseph Smith’s Journal | Escape from Prison 1839” are written sideways near the top in black ink. This notation, in unidentified handwriting, appears to be early archival marking. Textual redactions and use marks made in graphite pencil were added by later scribes who used the journal to produce the multivolume manuscript history of the church.
This thin journal was probably among the miscellaneous documents collectively listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Inventory,” [2]; “Historian’s Office Inventory,” [3], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


The use of the journal in connection with the manuscript history, early inventories, and recent archival records indicate that this journal—like the other JS journals—has remained in continuous church custody.2

See Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


Facts