27470

Journal, 1839

20–24 May 1839 • Monday–Friday

Monday 20th this week at home and employed dictating letters and attending to the various business of the Church

25 May 1839 • Saturday

On Saturday 25, met in conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

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with the twelve

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

View Glossary
, and others of the church W m Smith

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

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. case disposed of—

26 May 1839 • Sunday

Sunday at home, Elder O. Pratte [Orson Pratt]

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

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& John Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

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preached

27 May–8 June 1839 • Monday–Saturday

Monday 27th and beginning of the week at home, latter part of week he, (President Smith) went to Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

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with others of the Presidency

The presiding body of the church. From the day of the church’s organization on 6 April 1830, JS and Oliver Cowdery led the church in their capacity as elders. An 11 November 1831 revelation directed that “the duty of the president of the office of the high...

View Glossary
and returned on Wednesday 5th June Latter part at home

9 June 1839 • Sunday

Sunday 9th at meeting with wife

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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and family at Brother Bosiers [Squire Bozarth’s]

11 Jan. 1792–16 Mar. 1853. Born at Nelson Co., Virginia (later in Kentucky). Son of John Bozarth and Sarah Shaw. Lived at Grayson Co., Kentucky, 1810. Married Mildred (Millie) Hoard Willis at Litchfield, Grayson Co., 11 July 1816. Moved near present-day La...

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Elder [John E.] Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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preached— Elder Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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baptised

An ordinance in which an individual is immersed in water for the remission of sins. The Book of Mormon explained that those with necessary authority were to baptize individuals who had repented of their sins. Baptized individuals also received the gift of...

View Glossary
one woman

10 June 1839 • Monday

Monday 10th began to study & prepare to dictate history—

11 June 1839 • Tuesday

Tuesday commenced to dictate

11 Jun. 1839

JS resumed recording history with scribe James Mulholland, Commerce, Illinois, area.

and I to write history—

12–14 June 1839 • Wednesday–Friday

wednesday Thursday & Friday Generally so employed

15 June 1839 • Saturday

Saturday 15th June left home with his family on a visit [p. [2]]

20–24 May 1839 • Monday–Friday

Monday 20th this week at home and  employed dictating letters12

JS wrote to William W. Phelps declining his offer to sell property in Missouri for Joseph Smith Sr. JS also wrote letters to Newel K. Whitney and others, urging them to move to Commerce. (William W. Phelps, Far West, MO, to John P. Greene, Quincy, IL, 23 Apr. 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, p. 7; JS, Commerce, IL, to William W. Phelps, Far West, MO, 22 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, p. 7; JS, Commerce, IL, to Newel K. Whitney, 24 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, p. 13; JS, Commerce, IL, to G. W. Harris, Quincy, IL, 24 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 11–12; JS and Emma Smith, Commerce, IL, to “Judge Cleveland and Lady,” Quincy, IL, 24 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, p. 12.)  


and attending  to the various business of the Church13

On 21 May, JS and other church leaders surveyed several square miles of land in Iowa across the river from Commerce. (Woodruff, Journal, 21 May 1839.)  


25 May 1839 • Saturday

On Saturday 25, met in conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

View Glossary
 with the twelve

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

View Glossary
, and others of the church  W m Smith

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

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. case disposed of—14

William Smith was suspended from the Quorum of the Twelve at the 4–6 May 1839 conference.a Wilford Woodruff, also a member of the quorum, recorded that the Twelve “spent the day in council with Joseph” at his home and that “Brother W m . Smith was restored to his quorum.”b The council also discussed Lyman Wight’s letters—recently published in the Quincy Whig—regarding depredations committed against the Latter-day Saints in Missouri.c  


aGeneral Church Minutes, 4 May 1839.

bWoodruff, Journal, 25 May 1839; see also Kimball, “History,” 104.

cJS, Commerce, IL, to Lyman Wight, Quincy, IL, 27 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 13–14; “Difference of Opinion,” Quincy Whig, 25 May 1839, [1]; JS et al., Commerce, IL, to Robert B. Thompson, Quincy, IL, 25 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, p. 11.

26 May 1839 • Sunday

Sunday at home, Elder O. Pratte [Orson Pratt]

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

View Full Bio
& John  Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

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preached15

Wilford Woodruff’s journal clarifies that Pratt and Taylor preached in JS’s home. (Woodruff, Journal, 26 May 1839.)  


27 May–8 June 1839 • Monday–Saturday

Monday 27th and beginning of the  week at home, latter part of week  he, (President Smith) went to  Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

More Info
with others of the Presidency

The presiding body of the church. From the day of the church’s organization on 6 April 1830, JS and Oliver Cowdery led the church in their capacity as elders. An 11 November 1831 revelation directed that “the duty of the president of the office of the high...

View Glossary
 and returned on Wednesday 5th June16

At Quincy, JS met with Latter-day Saints, instructed members of the Quorum of the Seventy, and prepared licenses for missionaries. On 4 June, JS dictated a lengthy list of Missouri losses. (Woodruff, Journal, following 17 June 1839; Richards, “Pocket Companion,” 63–73; Missionary certificates for Brigham Young, George A. Smith, and Wilford Woodruff, Quincy, IL, 3 June 1839, signed by Sidney Rigdon, Hyrum Smith, and JS, JS Collection, CHL; JS, “Bill of Damages against the State of Missouri on Account of the Sufferings and Losses Sustained Therein,” Quincy, IL, 4 June 1839, JS Collection, CHL; compare JS, “Extract, from the Private Journal of Joseph Smith Jr.,” Times and Seasons, Nov. 1839, 1:7.)  


 Spent greater part of latter part  study and Latter part at home

9 June 1839 • Sunday

Sunday 11th <9th> at meeting with wife

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
 and family at Brother Bosiers [Squire Bozarth’s]

11 Jan. 1792–16 Mar. 1853. Born at Nelson Co., Virginia (later in Kentucky). Son of John Bozarth and Sarah Shaw. Lived at Grayson Co., Kentucky, 1810. Married Mildred (Millie) Hoard Willis at Litchfield, Grayson Co., 11 July 1816. Moved near present-day La...

View Full Bio
 <Elder [John E.] Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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pre[ach]ed17

TEXT: “pre[hole burned in paper]ed”.  


 Elder Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

View Full Bio
baptised

An ordinance in which an individual is immersed in water for the remission of sins. The Book of Mormon explained that those with necessary authority were to baptize individuals who had repented of their sins. Baptized individuals also received the gift of...

View Glossary
one woman>

10 June 1839 • Monday

Monday 12th <10th> began to study &  prepare to dictate history—18

JS began work on a new history the year before. JS and Mulholland evidently resumed work on the history at this time. (See JS, Journal, 30 Apr. 1838; 1, 2, 3, and 4 May 1838; and Mulholland, Journal, 10–13 June 1839.)  


11 June 1839 • Tuesday

Tuesday commenced to dictate

11 Jun. 1839

JS resumed recording history with scribe James Mulholland, Commerce, Illinois, area.

 and I to write history—19

James Mulholland’s handwriting appears in the surviving pages of a draft of the beginning of JS’s 1838–1856 history and in the first fifty-nine pages of the complete manuscript. Mulholland’s personal journal also records their work on the history. (JS History, 1839 [draft]; Jessee, “Writing of Joseph Smith’s History,” 441, 450, 464; JS History, vol. A-1, 1–59; Mulholland, Journal, 10–13 June 1839.)  


12–14 June 1839 • Wednesday–Friday

wednesday Thursday & Friday  Generally so employed

15 June 1839 • Saturday

Saturday 15th June left home  with his family on a visit [p. [2]]
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JS, “Minute Book. 1839 J. Smiths Journal Escape from Prison,” Journal, Apr.–Oct. 1839; handwriting of James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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; fifteen pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
Makeshift notebook, 10 x 4 inches (25 x 10 cm). The journal was fashioned by folding eight 10 x 8 inch (25 x 20 cm) sheets of paper in half lengthwise to form the notebook of sixteen leaves (thirty-two pages). Inscriptions that reach the end of a line and cross the gutter onto another leaf indicate that the folded pages were not sewn during their original use. Wear on the first and last pages indicates that the pages were not bound for some time. The text of the journal is inscribed on the first fifteen pages in black ink that later turned brown. The remaining seventeen pages are blank. At some point a cover for the notebook was made with a 10 x 16 inch (25 x 41 cm) sheet of blue-colored cover stock folded in half twice to create a 10 x 4 inch cover, which was then pamphlet bound with hand stitching. On the front cover, James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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wrote “Minute Book. | 1839 | J. Smiths Journal | Escape from Prison” with seven decorative underlines in black ink. On the back cover, the lines “Joseph Smith’s Journal | Escape from Prison 1839” are written sideways near the top in black ink. This notation, in unidentified handwriting, appears to be early archival marking. Textual redactions and use marks made in graphite pencil were added by later scribes who used the journal to produce the multivolume manuscript history of the church.
This thin journal was probably among the miscellaneous documents collectively listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Inventory,” [2]; “Historian’s Office Inventory,” [3], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


The use of the journal in connection with the manuscript history, early inventories, and recent archival records indicate that this journal—like the other JS journals—has remained in continuous church custody.2

See Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


Facts