27470

Journal, 1839

and afterwards proceeded to read portions from the Bible and Book of Mormon concerning the best criterions whereby to judge of its authenticity. And then went on to show that no impostor would ever attempt to make such promises as are contained in pages 541 and 34th—36

The promises to which Page referred were apparently on pages 541 and 534 of the original 1830 edition of the Book of Mormon, not the 1837 edition. Those pages of the original edition correspond to Ether 2:4–13 and Mormon 8:26–36 in the modern edition of the Book of Mormon. Promises found on page 541 concern freedom for the “land which is choice above all other lands,” contingent on the inhabitants serving Jesus Christ. The content of page 534 focuses on conditions that would prevail when the Book of Mormon would be brought forth “out of the earth.”  


which he did in a very satisfactory manner. & then bore testimony one hour,—— Afternoon—— The meeting was again opened by prayer &c Elder John Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

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spoke on the subject of this dispensation

A period of God’s work on earth, such as the “dispensation of the gospel of Abraham.” The biblical phrase “dispensation of the fulness of times” appears often in the writing of early Latter-day Saints; they typically used it to describe the final dispensation...

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— The other angel which John saw.— having the everlasting gospel to preach &c &37

Taylor, like other Latter-day Saints, believed that the “everlasting gospel” had been restored to the earth by an angel, as prophesied by John the Revelator. (See Revelation 14:6–7; and Revelation, 3 Nov. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 100:4, 1835 ed. [D&C 133:36–40].)  


—— hee then bore testimony of the truth of the Book of Mormon &c &c
Elder Wilford Woodruff

1 Mar. 1807–2 Sept. 1898. Farmer, miller. Born at Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Aphek Woodruff and Beulah Thompson. Moved to Richland, Oswego Co., New York, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Zera Pulsipher, 31 Dec. 1833, near Richland. Ordained...

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s address went chiefly to exhortation to the Saints to perseverance after which he bore his testimony also.
Eder Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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next came forward and having alluded to his own late fall, exhorted all to perseverance in the things of God, expressed himself one with his brethren, and bore testimony to his knowledge of the truth and the misery of falling from it.
Elder Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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made some very appropriate remarks, and also bore testimony to the truth of these [p. 7]
and afterwards proceeded to read portions  from the the Bible and Book of Mormon  concerning the best criterions whereby  to judge of its authenticity. And  then went on to show that no impostor  would ever attempt to make such  promises as are contained [in] pages 541  and 34th36

The promises to which Page referred were apparently on pages 541 and 534 of the original 1830 edition of the Book of Mormon, not the 1837 edition. Those pages of the original edition correspond to Ether 2:4–13 and Mormon 8:26–36 in the modern edition of the Book of Mormon. Promises found on page 541 concern freedom for the “land which is choice above all other lands,” contingent on the inhabitants serving Jesus Christ. The content of page 534 focuses on conditions that would prevail when the Book of Mormon would be brought forth “out of the earth.”  


which he did in a very satis factory manner. <& then bore testimony>  after which the meeting adjourned for  one hour,—— Afternoon——  The meeting was again opened by prayer &c  Elder John Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

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spoke on the subject  of this dispensation

A period of God’s work on earth, such as the “dispensation of the gospel of Abraham.” The biblical phrase “dispensation of the fulness of times” appears often in the writing of early Latter-day Saints; they typically used it to describe the final dispensation...

View Glossary
— The other angel  which John saw.— having the everlasting  gospel to preach &c &37

Taylor, like other Latter-day Saints, believed that the “everlasting gospel” had been restored to the earth by an angel, as prophesied by John the Revelator. (See Revelation 14:6–7; and Revelation, 3 Nov. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 100:4, 1835 ed. [D&C 133:36–40].)  


—— <hee then bore testimony  of the truth of the Book of Mormon &c &c>
Elder [Wilford] Woodruff

1 Mar. 1807–2 Sept. 1898. Farmer, miller. Born at Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Aphek Woodruff and Beulah Thompson. Moved to Richland, Oswego Co., New York, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Zera Pulsipher, 31 Dec. 1833, near Richland. Ordained...

View Full Bio
s address went chiefly  to exhortation to the Saints to perseverance  after which he bore his testimony also.
Eder Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
next came forward  and having alluded to his own late  fall, exhorted all to perseverance in  the things of God, expressed himself one  with his brethren, and bore testimony  to his knowledge of the truth and  the misery of falling from it.
Elder Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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made some  very appropriate remarks, and  also bore testimony to the truth of these [p. 7]
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JS, “Minute Book. 1839 J. Smiths Journal Escape from Prison,” Journal, Apr.–Oct. 1839; handwriting of James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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; fifteen pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
Makeshift notebook, 10 x 4 inches (25 x 10 cm). The journal was fashioned by folding eight 10 x 8 inch (25 x 20 cm) sheets of paper in half lengthwise to form the notebook of sixteen leaves (thirty-two pages). Inscriptions that reach the end of a line and cross the gutter onto another leaf indicate that the folded pages were not sewn during their original use. Wear on the first and last pages indicates that the pages were not bound for some time. The text of the journal is inscribed on the first fifteen pages in black ink that later turned brown. The remaining seventeen pages are blank. At some point a cover for the notebook was made with a 10 x 16 inch (25 x 41 cm) sheet of blue-colored cover stock folded in half twice to create a 10 x 4 inch cover, which was then pamphlet bound with hand stitching. On the front cover, James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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wrote “Minute Book. | 1839 | J. Smiths Journal | Escape from Prison” with seven decorative underlines in black ink. On the back cover, the lines “Joseph Smith’s Journal | Escape from Prison 1839” are written sideways near the top in black ink. This notation, in unidentified handwriting, appears to be early archival marking. Textual redactions and use marks made in graphite pencil were added by later scribes who used the journal to produce the multivolume manuscript history of the church.
This thin journal was probably among the miscellaneous documents collectively listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Inventory,” [2]; “Historian’s Office Inventory,” [3], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


The use of the journal in connection with the manuscript history, early inventories, and recent archival records indicate that this journal—like the other JS journals—has remained in continuous church custody.2

See Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


Facts